2

I noticed a SO answer suggesting or-delimited matches for IgnoreRoute, like this:

routes.IgnoreRoute("*.js|css|swf");

When I gave that a try, it failed. I had to convert that suggested one-line of code into multiple lines, like this:

routes.IgnoreRoute("Javascript/{*catchall}");
routes.IgnoreRoute("Content/{*catchall}");
routes.IgnoreRoute("Scripts/{*catchall}");

Is there in fact a more compact way to express the exemption of files (e.g. css, javascript, etc.)? Also, I'm wondering if the original link was truly mistaken, or I just missed something.

And yes, please assume that I want and need routes.RouteExistingFiles = true

2

I figured out a simpler way:

routes.RouteExistingFiles = true;
routes.IgnoreRoute("{*relpath}", new { relpath = @"(.*)?\.(css|js|htm|html)" });

No need to worry about trailing http query strings either, as the System.Web.Routing.Route class has that portion stripped off already during the evaluation.

It's also interesting that the code within Route.GetRouteData(...) will take the provided regex constraint, and add "beginning" and "end" line requirements, like this:

string str = myRegexStatementFromAbove;
string str2 = string.Concat("^(", str, ")$");

This is why the regex I wrote doesn't work if it was merely written as:

routes.IgnoreRoute("{*relpath}", new { relpath = @"\.(css|js|htm|html)" });
1

I'm not sure whether you can specify all of them in a single line. The other way is you can create a custom route constraint and ignore those folders/files completely.

UPDATE:

Based on the feedback from @Brent checking the pathinfo is better than comparing the folder.

public class IgnoreConstraint : IRouteConstraint
{
    private readonly string[] _ignoreList;

    public IgnoreConstraint(params string[] ignoreList)
    {
        _ignoreList = ignoreList;
    }

    public bool Match(System.Web.HttpContextBase httpContext, Route route, string parameterName, 
    RouteValueDictionary values, RouteDirection routeDirection)
    {
        return _ignoreList.Contains(Path.GetExtension(values["pathinfo"].ToString()));
    }
}

Global.asax.cs

routes.IgnoreRoute("{*pathInfo}", new { c = 
           new IgnoreConstraint(".js", ".css") });

routes.RouteExistingFiles = true;

================================================================================

Previous code

  public class IgnoreConstraint: IRouteConstraint
  {
    private readonly string[] _ignoreArray;

    public IgnoreConstraint(params string[] ignoreArray)
    {
      _ignoreArray = ignoreArray;
    }

    public bool Match(System.Web.HttpContextBase httpContext, Route route, string parameterName, 
      RouteValueDictionary values, RouteDirection routeDirection)
    {
      var folder = values["folder"].ToString().ToLower();

      return _ignoreArray.Contains(folder);
    }
  }

In Global.asax.cs

routes.IgnoreRoute("{folder}/{*pathInfo}", new { c = 
          new IgnoreConstraint("content", "script") });

routes.RouteExistingFiles = true;
  • By the time the "custom constraint" level-of-effort has been made, then I'm probably better off just using a verbose listing of IgnoreRoute statements, assuming it isn't a very long list anyway. Still, the scenario where I'd be tempted to use your solution would be if I tested the file extension found in the {*pathInfo} rather than the folder in the {folder} segment. That way I would not care where my .js, .css, or .html files were found. Kudos for suggesting the custom constraint. – Brent Arias Jun 26 '12 at 15:53
  • I agree with you checking the pathinfo is lot better compared to the folder. I was little lazy when I was trying that. Well, I update the answer so it will be helpful for someone. Thanks for pointing that :) – VJAI Jun 26 '12 at 16:13
  • I like the update. Excellent! – Brent Arias Jun 26 '12 at 22:50

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