Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm guessing it needs to be something like:

CONVERT(CHAR(24), lastModified, 101)

However I'm not sure of the right value for the third parameter.

Thanks!


Well I'm trying to write a script to copy my sql server db to a sqlite file, which gets downloaded to an air app, which then syncs the data to another sqlite file. I'm having a ton of trouble with dates. If I select a date in air and try to insert it, it fails because it's not in the right format... even if it was a valid date to begin with. I figured I'd try to experiment with the unix time since that's the only thing thats worked so far. I am considering just leaving them as varchar because I don't sort by them anyway.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

Last epoch is when 1970 GMT?

SELECT DATEDIFF(s,'19700101 05:00:00:000',lastModified)

See also Epoch Date

share|improve this answer

sqlite> select datetime();
2011-01-27 19:32:57

sqlite> select strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S','now');
2011-01-27 19:33:57

REFERENCE:
(Date time Functions)[http://sqlite.org/lang_datefunc.html]

share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I wound up using format 120 in MS SQL:

convert(char(24), lastModified, 120)

Each time I needed to a select a date in SQLite for non-display purposes I used:

strftime(\"%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S\", dateModified) as dateModified

Now I just need a readable/friendly way to display the date to the user!

edit: accept answer goes to whoever shows me how to display the date nicely from sqlite ;p

share|improve this answer
    
Challenge accepted: Not quite sure what you mean by "display nicely", so I'll guess you mean ... –  Noah Jan 27 '11 at 19:35
    
not quite sure what i needed this for as it's from 2 and a half years ago –  Shawn Jan 28 '11 at 1:55

Define "last epoch". Does this come close?

Select Cast(lastModified As Integer)

share|improve this answer

If you store them as varchar, store them as YYYYMMDD. That way you CAN sort by them later if you want to.

share|improve this answer

SQL server has only 2 failsafe date formats

ISO = YYYYMMDD, run this to see that

  select convert(varchar(10),getdate(),112)

ISO8601 = yyyy-mm-dd Thh:mm:ss:mmm(no spaces) run this to see that

select convert(varchar(30),getdate(),126)

To learn more about how dates are stored in SQL server I wrote How Are Dates Stored In SQL Server?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.