6

As an experiment (and because I'm generating anonymous functions off of user data) I ran the following MATLAB code:

h = @(x) x * x
    h = @(x) x * x
h(3)
    ans = 9
h = @(x) h(x) + 1
    h = @(x)h(x)+1
h(3)
    ans = 10

Basically, I made an anonymous function call itself. Instead of acting recursively, MATLAB remembered the old function definition. However, the workspace doesn't show it as one of the variables, and the handle doesn't seem to know it either.

Will the old function be stored behind the scenes as long as I keep the new one? Are there any "gotchas" with this kind of construction?

  • I would say that design all by itself is a "gotcha" and a bad idea, since it is so nonintuitive and hides so much from anyone else looking at the code. – tmpearce Jun 26 '12 at 18:27
8

An anonymous function remembers the relevant part of the workspace at the time of definition, and makes a copy of it. Thus, if you include a variable in the definition of the anonymous function, and change that variable later, it will keep the old value inside the anonymous function.

>> a=1;
>> h=@(x)x+a %# define an anonymous function
h = 
    @(x)x+a
>> h(1)
ans =
     2
>> a=2 %# change the variable
a =
     2
>> h(1)
ans =
     2 %# the anonymous function does not change
>> g = @()length(whos)
g = 
    @()length(whos)
>> g()
ans =
     0 %# the workspace copy of the anonymous function is empty
>> g = @()length(whos)+a
g = 
    @()length(whos)+a
>> g()
ans =
     3 %# now, there is something in the workspace (a is 2)
>> g = @()length(whos)+a*0
g = 
    @()length(whos)+a*0
>> g()
ans =
     1 %# matlab doesn't care whether it is necessary to remember the variable
>> 
  • So does this mean that I don't want to use anonymous functions with large matrices, especially if memory is a concern? Do anonymous functions with constants work like functions with arguments, where they only make a copy when things get changed? – Andrew says Reinstate Monica Jun 26 '12 at 19:09
  • 2
    @AndrewPiliser: I would assume that the copy-on-write applies to anonymous functions as well, i.e. as long as you don't change the value of a, you'll be fine. edit: just tested it. Yes, it's copy-on-write. – Jonas Jun 26 '12 at 19:16
  • 1
    +1 FYI, I think that anonymous functions capture a copy of not just the "relevant part" of the workspace, but the entire workspace as of the time of handle creation. At least in earlier Matlab versions. (The existence of eval means Matlab can't necessarily know at parse time what is relevant.) Nested functions work this way wrt live variables they close over. You can use info = functions(h) on your function handle to see what it captured, or examine it in the debugger. – Andrew Janke Mar 18 '13 at 4:02

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