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I have looked through the information that the Python documentation for pickle gives, but I'm still a little confused. What would be some sample code that would write a new file and then use pickle to dump a dictionary into it?

2

10 Answers 10

1320

Try this:

import pickle

a = {'hello': 'world'}

with open('filename.pickle', 'wb') as handle:
    pickle.dump(a, handle, protocol=pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)

with open('filename.pickle', 'rb') as handle:
    b = pickle.load(handle)

print(a == b)

There's nothing about the above solution that is specific to a dict object. This same approach will will work for many Python objects, including instances of arbitrary classes and arbitrarily complex nestings of data structures. For example, replacing the second line with these lines:

import datetime
today = datetime.datetime.now()
a = [{'hello': 'world'}, 1, 2.3333, 4, True, "x", 
     ("y", [[["z"], "y"], "x"]), {'today', today}]

will produce a result of True as well.

Some objects can't be pickled due to their very nature. For example, it doesn't make sense to pickle a structure containing a handle to an open file.

7
  • 50
    What does pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL actually do? May 2, 2018 at 23:27
  • 22
    @BallpointBen: It picks the highest protocol version your version of Python supports: docs.python.org/3/library/pickle.html#data-stream-format
    – Blender
    May 3, 2018 at 0:53
  • 5
    To make it more concise you can write protocol=-1 (similar to -1 indexing in a list). Nov 1, 2019 at 4:13
  • 2
    If you are saving/loading a large object, please do use pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL. Otherwise you may waste a lot of time and disk space.
    – Qin Heyang
    Sep 9, 2022 at 0:38
  • 1
    HIGHEST_PROTOCOL is subject to change, so it is better to choose a protocol and stick to it. Otherwise you will get your pickles deprecated and end up trying to figure out which protocol was used.
    – nurettin
    Mar 1, 2023 at 11:12
174

Use:

import pickle

your_data = {'foo': 'bar'}

# Store data (serialize)
with open('filename.pickle', 'wb') as handle:
    pickle.dump(your_data, handle, protocol=pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)

# Load data (deserialize)
with open('filename.pickle', 'rb') as handle:
    unserialized_data = pickle.load(handle)

print(your_data == unserialized_data)

The advantage of HIGHEST_PROTOCOL is that files get smaller. This makes unpickling sometimes much faster.

Important notice: The answer was written in 2015 (Python 3.4!). Back then, the maximum file size of pickle was about 2 GB.

Alternative way

import mpu
your_data = {'foo': 'bar'}
mpu.io.write('filename.pickle', data)
unserialized_data = mpu.io.read('filename.pickle')

Alternative Formats

For your application, the following might be important:

  • Support by other programming languages
  • Reading / writing performance
  • Compactness (file size)

See also: Comparison of data serialization formats

In case you are rather looking for a way to make configuration files, you might want to read my short article Configuration files in Python

4
  • How did you determine the maximum limit? I was not aware of any limit and have pickled and unpickled 7GB in the past, without encountering anything suspicious.
    – Bastian
    Mar 24, 2023 at 18:15
  • I don't remember exactly as this is more than 8 years ago. I think I just ran into an error message Mar 24, 2023 at 18:17
  • Ah, ok, so it is probably memory-related.
    – Bastian
    Mar 24, 2023 at 18:20
  • I just pickled and unpickled a 4.7 GB file. You might want to remove the point. Jul 12, 2023 at 22:14
46

Save a dictionary into a pickle file.

import pickle

favorite_color = {"lion": "yellow", "kitty": "red"}  # create a dictionary
pickle.dump(favorite_color, open("save.p", "wb"))  # save it into a file named save.p

# -------------------------------------------------------------
# Load the dictionary back from the pickle file.
import pickle

favorite_color = pickle.load(open("save.p", "rb"))
# favorite_color is now {"lion": "yellow", "kitty": "red"}
0
17

A simple way to dump Python data (e.g., a dictionary) to a pickle file:

import pickle

your_dictionary = {}

pickle.dump(your_dictionary, open('pickle_file_name.p', 'wb'))
0
16

In general, pickling a dict will fail unless you have only simple objects in it, like strings and integers.

Python 2.7.9 (default, Dec 11 2014, 01:21:43)
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> from numpy import *
>>> type(globals())
<type 'dict'>
>>> import pickle
>>> pik = pickle.dumps(globals())
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 1374, in dumps
    Pickler(file, protocol).dump(obj)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 224, in dump
    self.save(obj)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 649, in save_dict
    self._batch_setitems(obj.iteritems())
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 663, in _batch_setitems
    save(v)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 306, in save
    rv = reduce(self.proto)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/copy_reg.py", line 70, in _reduce_ex
    raise TypeError, "can't pickle %s objects" % base.__name__
TypeError: can't pickle module objects
>>>

Even a really simple dict will often fail. It just depends on the contents.

>>> d = {'x': lambda x:x}
>>> pik = pickle.dumps(d)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 1374, in dumps
    Pickler(file, protocol).dump(obj)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 224, in dump
    self.save(obj)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 649, in save_dict
    self._batch_setitems(obj.iteritems())
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 663, in _batch_setitems
    save(v)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 748, in save_global
    (obj, module, name))
pickle.PicklingError: Can't pickle <function <lambda> at 0x102178668>: it's not found as __main__.<lambda>

However, if you use a better serializer like dill or cloudpickle, then most dictionaries can be pickled:

>>> import dill
>>> pik = dill.dumps(d)

Or if you want to save your dict to a file...

>>> with open('save.pik', 'w') as f:
...   dill.dump(globals(), f)
...

The latter example is identical to any of the other good answers posted here (which aside from neglecting the picklability of the contents of the dict are good).

11

Use:

>>> import pickle
>>> with open("/tmp/picklefile", "wb") as f:
...     pickle.dump({}, f)
...

Normally it's preferable to use the cPickle implementation:

>>> import cPickle as pickle
>>> help(pickle.dump)
Help on built-in function dump in module cPickle:

dump(...)
    dump(obj, file, protocol=0) -- Write an object in pickle format to the given file.

    See the Pickler docstring for the meaning of optional argument proto.
0
9

If you just want to store the dict in a single file, use pickle like this:

import pickle

a = {'hello': 'world'}

with open('filename.pickle', 'wb') as handle:
    pickle.dump(a, handle)

with open('filename.pickle', 'rb') as handle:
    b = pickle.load(handle)

If you want to save and restore multiple dictionaries in multiple files for caching and store more complex data, use anycache. It does all the other stuff you need around pickle

from anycache import anycache

@anycache(cachedir='path/to/files')
def myfunc(hello):
    return {'hello', hello}

Anycache stores the different myfunc results, depending on the arguments to different files in cachedir and reloads them.

See the documentation for any further details.

0
3

FYI, Pandas has a method to save pickles now.

I find it easier.

pd.to_pickle(object_to_save,'/temp/saved_pkl.pickle' )
2
import pickle

dictobj = {'Jack' : 123, 'John' : 456}

filename = "/foldername/filestore"

fileobj = open(filename, 'wb')

pickle.dump(dictobj, fileobj)

fileobj.close()
2

If you want to handle writing or reading in one line without file opening:

  import joblib

  my_dict = {'hello': 'world'}

  joblib.dump(my_dict, "my_dict.pickle") # write pickle file
  my_dict_loaded = joblib.load("my_dict.pickle") # read pickle file
2
  • This is irrelevant, as OP did not ask about caching in this case. May 18, 2022 at 0:18
  • 2
    Where is caching here? It is saving the dictionary content into a pickle file as asked in the question.
    – gench
    Dec 5, 2022 at 13:21

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