628

I have a site with the following structure:

<div id="header"></div>

<div id="main">
  <div id="navigation"></div>
  <div id="content"></div>
</div>

<div id="footer"></div>

The navigation is on the left and the content div is on the right. The information for the content div is pulled in through PHP, so it's different every time.

How can I scale the navigation vertically so that its height is the same as the content div's height, no matter which page is loaded?

2
  • 1
    Use display table on parent and display table-cell on child. This will make child as long as the parent is. See stackoverflow.com/q/22712489/3429430
    – user31782
    Dec 7 '16 at 17:07
  • 8
    You can just set display: flex; align-items: stretch; for the div#main. And don't use height: 100% for div#content
    – Igor
    Jun 19 '19 at 11:44

27 Answers 27

593

For the parent:

display: flex;

You should add some prefixes, http://css-tricks.com/using-flexbox/.

As @Adam Garner noted, align-items: stretch; is not needed. Its usage is also for parent, not children. If you want to define children stretching, you use align-self.

.parent {
  background: red;
  padding: 10px;
  display:flex;
}

.other-child {
  width: 100px;
  background: yellow;
  height: 150px;
  padding: .5rem;
}

.child {  
  width: 100px;
  background: blue;
}
<div class="parent">
  <div class="other-child">
    Only used for stretching the parent
  </div>
  <div class="child"></div>
</div>

8
  • 4
    IE11 does not play nicely with flexbox and heights. click on "known issues" here: caniuse.com/#feat=flexbox
    – adamdport
    Jul 22 '16 at 18:24
  • @SuperUberDuper Well you can use it in bootstrap as this: jsfiddle.net/prdwaynk But if i were you, i would use foundation which is production ready with flexbox: foundation.zurb.com/sites/docs/xy-grid.html BS4 will also have Flexbox, but it is still in alpha, and i think foundation is better anyway.
    – Aiphee
    Sep 10 '17 at 6:49
  • 8
    If you're using align-items: center then the item you need to stretch needs align-self: normal
    – Dominic
    Aug 22 '18 at 8:50
  • 4
    This is not a right answer, cuz this needs to set parent height. Question said 'without specifying parent's height?'.
    – SkuraZZ
    Mar 13 '19 at 7:28
  • 4
    @Aiphee downvoting because it appears you didn't see the part about not having to set the parents height right there in the original question text, yet your "solution" does exactly that.
    – tylerism
    May 7 '19 at 15:05
194

NOTE: This answer is applicable to legacy browsers without support for the Flexbox standard. For a modern approach, see: https://stackoverflow.com/a/23300532/1155721


I suggest you take a look at Equal Height Columns with Cross-Browser CSS and No Hacks.

Basically, doing this with CSS in a browser compatible way is not trivial (but trivial with tables) so find yourself an appropriate pre-packaged solution.

Also, the answer varies on whether you want 100% height or equal height. Usually it's equal height. If it's 100% height the answer is slightly different.

2
  • 8
    This looks like a nice solution until you draw a border border:1px solid blue e.g. on container2 : the blue border is on the first two columns, not on the second column only as you would have expected. Mar 7 '13 at 12:17
  • @bfritz, a better solution would be to use display:table
    – Siler
    Dec 17 '14 at 22:20
104

This is a frustrating issue that's dealt with designers all the time. The trick is that you need to set the height to 100% on BODY and HTML in your CSS.

html,body {
    height:100%;
}

This seemingly pointless code is to define to the browser what 100% means. Frustrating, yes, but is the simplest way.

6
  • 11
    Except it does not always work, for example if you have a relative positioned element inside an absolute positioned one, it no longer forces hasLayout.
    – tim
    May 15 '13 at 0:11
  • 1
    Also, if you want to get rid of the scrollbar on the right-hand side of the window (appears in Firefox v28), give the window some breathing room: html { height: 100%; } body { height: 98%; }. Apr 24 '14 at 17:39
  • 71
    This only works if all the parents have height 100%, it's not enough to set only the html and the body, all parents must have a height defined.
    – RaduM
    May 15 '14 at 18:38
  • I agree with you, but this seems to be answering a different question. Was the OP talking about the whole page? The way it reads now, it looks like it's just about being 100% the height of the parent element, which probably isn't the page or the viewport. May 27 at 17:20
  • Thanks, I have used the same code for other projects without knowing what really it does. If you apply height: 100% to just body it will not work that is a bit frustrating for me. Oct 12 at 9:51
98

I find that setting the two columns to display: table-cell; instead of float: left; works well.

6
  • 11
    MS themselves don't support it anymore, if that helps anyone convince their clients... May 4 '14 at 11:51
  • 4
    This should be the accepted answer. Times have changed, this answer works in all browsers(with on small quirk in Safari 5.1.17). Two lines of CSS and you instantly have the effect you're looking for with no draw back I can think of.
    – callmetwan
    May 29 '14 at 0:26
  • 7
    Hoist this answer. Put your backs into it lads!
    – user764357
    Aug 29 '14 at 4:44
  • This is the best answer. Yes we can make a table to do this, but its not tabular data, instead we treat the divs as if they were table cells... Brilliant!
    – Derokorian
    Jan 4 '15 at 18:33
  • This actually put me in the right direction for a different scenario. In case someone is struggling to work with square divs that are also flex containers in Firefox or Edge, just remember to set the :before element to display: table. Don't ask me why but it fixes it.
    – CGodo
    Jul 9 '16 at 22:38
59

If you don't mind the navigation div being clipped in the event of an unexpectedly-short content div, there's at least one easy way:

#main {
position: relative;
}

#main #navigation {
position: absolute;
top: 0;
left: 0;
bottom: 0;
width: 10em; /* or whatever */
}

#main #content {
margin: 0;
margin-left: 10em; /* or whatever width you set for #navigation */
}

Elsewise there's the faux-columns technique.

3
  • 2
    Thanks a ton, you saved my day. Didn't knew one could define both top and bottom and it would work this way.
    – rubish
    Mar 14 '13 at 2:37
  • This will make the content of the container stop resizing it.
    – DreamWave
    Aug 5 '13 at 7:58
  • +1 because it specifically addresses the OP's question "How to Force Child Div to 100% of Parent's Div Without Specifying Parent's Height?" My problem didn't require columns (which are mentioned in the question detail but not in the main headline) but rather one div behind another. This answer works in both applications.
    – Luke
    Apr 3 '17 at 10:11
33
#main {
    overflow: hidden;
}
#navigation, #content {
    margin-bottom: -1000px;
    padding-bottom: 1000px;
}
2
  • I must say I was looking for this kind of solution. Dead simple and so obvious that nobody figured it out. Congrats @Roman!
    – Greg0ry
    Aug 23 '15 at 23:29
  • Thanks a lot! I also consider this a the goto solution for many of my similar CSS problems, where elements confined to an area using overflow and percentage width/height, are often pushing the outside layout around - all apparently due to the bottom margin. Sep 15 '20 at 12:42
15

using jQuery:

$(function() {
    function unifyHeights() {
        var maxHeight = 0;
        $('#container').children('#navigation, #content').each(function() {
            var height = $(this).outerHeight();
            // alert(height);
            if ( height > maxHeight ) {
                maxHeight = height;
            }
        });
        $('#navigation, #content').css('height', maxHeight);
    }
    unifyHeights();
});
3
  • 24
    Math.max() would be your friend here.
    – alex
    May 28 '12 at 6:34
  • 1
    Couldn't get the CSS to work in all cases for me an really just needed a quick fix. It may not be the most standard approach, but this did the job just fine. Thanks! :-]
    – user131441
    Dec 20 '12 at 20:47
  • 1
    When using JQuery's css function, you cannot differentiate between screen and print media, as you usually do when using pure CSS solutions. Thus, you may have printing issues. Mar 19 '13 at 7:34
12

Try making the bottom margin 100%.

margin-bottom: 100%;
2
  • 6
    or padding-bottom: 100%; it's not precise but it works well for some situations.
    – Jason
    Sep 26 '14 at 22:29
  • padding-bottom does the trick in my case. This solution is very similar to what @Roman Kuntyi posted.
    – Greg0ry
    Aug 23 '15 at 23:31
12
#main {
   display: table;
} 
#navigation, #content {
   display: table-cell;
}

Look at this example.

2
  • This is exactly what I was doing, wanted to add an answer. I was also using height: 100% but it turn out it was not needed.
    – jcubic
    Dec 12 '16 at 13:00
  • Tables in css layouts aren't recommended for modern sites Oct 5 at 17:48
12

After long searching and try, nothing solved my problem except

style = "height:100%;"

on the children div

and for parent apply this

.parent {
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: column;
}

also, I am using bootstrap and this did not corrupt the responsive for me.

1
  • 2
    I had to remove flex-direction: column; for this to work for me. Dec 2 '16 at 15:43
12

height : <percent> will only work, if you have all parent nodes with specified percent height with a fixed height in pixels, ems, etc. on top level. That way, the height will cascade down to your element.

You can specify 100% to html and body elements as @Travis stated earlier to have the page height cascade down to your nodes.

8

Add display: grid to the parent

0
6

Based on the method described in this article I have created .Less dynamic solution:

Html:

<div id="container3">
    <div id="container2">
        <div id="container1">
            <div id="col1">Column 1</div>
            <div id="col2">Column 2</div>
            <div id="col3">Column 3</div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

Less:

/* Changes these variables to adjust your columns */
@col1Width: 60%;
@col2Width: 1%;
@padding: 0%;

/* Misc variable. Do not change */
@col3Width: 100% - @col1Width - @col2Width;

#container3 {
    float: left;
    width: 100%;
    overflow: hidden;
    background-color: red;
    position: relative;

    #container2 {
        float: left;
        width: 100%;
        position: relative;
        background-color: yellow;
        right: @col3Width;

        #container1 {
            float: left;
            width: 100%;
            position: relative;
            right: @col2Width;
            background-color: green;

            #col1 {
                float: left;
                width: @col1Width - @padding * 2;
                position: relative;
                left: 100% - @col1Width + @padding;
                overflow: hidden;
            }

            .col2 {
                float: left;
                width: @col2Width - @padding * 2;
                position: relative;
                left: 100% - @col1Width + @padding + @padding * 2;
                overflow: hidden;
            }

            #col3 {
                float: left;
                width: @col3Width - @padding * 2;
                position: relative;
                left: 100% - @col1Width + @padding + @padding * 4;
                overflow: hidden;
            }
        }
    }
}
3

I know it's been a looong time since the question was made, but I found an easy solution and thought someone could use it (sorry about the poor english). Here it goes:

CSS

.main, .sidebar {
    float: none;
    padding: 20px;
    vertical-align: top;
}
.container {
    display: table;
}
.main {
    width: 400px;
    background-color: LightSlateGrey;
    display: table-cell;
}
.sidebar {
    width: 200px;
    display: table-cell;
    background-color: Tomato;
}

HTML

<div class="container clearfix">
    <div class="sidebar">
        simple text here
    </div>
    <div class="main">
        Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam congue, tortor in mattis mattis, arcu erat pharetra orci, at vestibulum lorem ante a felis. Integer sit amet est ac elit vulputate lobortis. Vestibulum in ipsum nulla. Aenean erat elit, lacinia sit amet adipiscing quis, aliquet at erat. Vivamus massa sem, cursus vel semper non, dictum vitae mi. Donec sed bibendum ante.
    </div>
</div>

Simple example. Note that you can turn into responsiveness.

1
  • Oh, I forgot: if you want to align the .sidebar content in the middle, just change "vertical-align: top" to "vertical-align: middle". Oct 29 '14 at 12:09
2

My solution:

$(window).resize(function() {
   $('#div_to_occupy_the_rest').height(
        $(window).height() - $('#div_to_occupy_the_rest').offset().top
    );
});
1

There is a bit of a contradiction in the question's title and the content. The title speaks of a parent div, but the question makes it sound like you want two sibling divs (navigation and content) to be the same height.

Do you (a) want both navigation and content to be 100% the height of main, or (b) want navigation and content to be be same height?

I'll assume (b)...if that is so, I don't think you will be able to do it given your current page structure (at least, not with pure CSS and no scripting). You would probably need to do something like:

<main div>
    <content div>
         <navigation div></div>
    </div>
</div>

and set the content div to have a left margin of whatever the width of the navigation pane is. That way, the content's content is to the right of the navigation and you can set the navigation div to be 100% of the content's height.

EDIT: I'm doing this completely in my head, but you would probably also need to set the navigation div's left margin to a negative value or set it's absolute left to 0 to shove it back to the far left. Problem is, there are many ways to pull this off but not all of them are going to be compatible with all browsers.

1

[Referring to Dmity's Less code in another answer] I'm guessing that this is some kind of "pseudo-code"?

From what I understand try using the faux-columns technique that should do the trick.

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/fauxcolumns/

Hope this helps :)

1
  • 4
    Depending on sorting order of answers, it is hard to tell what "this" refers to... I am guessing it is about Dmitry's code. Thus, this remark belongs to a comment below his answer! And, for your information, it is not pseudo-code, it is code in the Less language, a way of defining CSS in a procedural way.
    – PhiLho
    Apr 29 '13 at 12:30
1

This trick does work: Adding a final element in your section of HTML with a style of clear:both;

    <div style="clear:both;"></div>

Everything before that will be included in the height.

0
1

giving position: absolute; to the child worked in my case

1

You use CSS Flexbox

.flex-container {
  display: flex;
  background-color: DodgerBlue;
}

.flex-container > div {
  background-color: #f1f1f1;
  margin: 10px;
  padding: 20px;
  font-size: 30px;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>

<div class="flex-container">
  <div>1</div>
  <div>2</div>
  <div>3</div>  
</div>

<p>A Flexible Layout must have a parent element with the <em>display</em> property set to <em>flex</em>.</p>

<p>Direct child elements(s) of the flexible container automatically becomes flexible items.</p>

</body>
</html>

0
1

This answer is not ideal any more since CSS flexbox and grid where implemented to CSS. However it is still a working solution

On a smaller screen you would probably want to keep the height auto as the col1, col2 and col3 are stacked on one another.

However after a media query breakpoint you would like cols to appear next to each other with an equal height for all columns.

1125 px is only an example of window width breakpoint after which you would want to make all columns set to the same height.

<div class="wraper">
    <div class="col1">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.</div>
    <div class="col2">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Eos laudantium, possimus sed, debitis amet in, explicabo dolor similique eligendi officia numquam eaque quae illo magnam distinctio odio, esse vero aspernatur.</div>
    <div class="col3">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Dolorem, odio qui praesentium.</div>
</div>

You could, of course, set more breakpoints if you need to.

<script>
    $(document).ready(function(){
        $(window).on('load resize', function() {
            let vraperH = $('.wraper').height();
            if (window.innerWidth>= 1125) {
              $('.col1').height(vraperH);
              $('.col2').height(vraperH);
              $('.col3').height(vraperH);
            }
            if (window.innerWidth < 1125) {
              $('.col1').height('auto');
              $('.col2').height('auto');
              $('.col3').height('auto');
            }
        });
    });
</script>
1

I had the same issue, it worked based on Hakam Fostok's answer, I've created a small example, in some cases it might work without having to add display: flex; and flex-direction: column; on the parent container

.row {
    margin-top: 20px;
}

.col {
    box-sizing: border-box;
    border: solid 1px #6c757d;
    padding: 10px;
}

.card {
    background-color: #a0a0a0;
    height: 100%;
}

JSFiddle

1

For 2021 Readers:

Try this:

.parent {
  position: relative;

  display: flex;                 // And you will probably need this too.
  flex-direction: row;           // or column.
}

.child {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;

  align-self: center;            // And you will probably need this too.
}

Here is what I'm working on:

0

As shown earlier, flexbox is the easiest. eg.

#main{ display: flex; align-items:center;}

this will align all child elements to the center within the parent element.

1
  • 3
    this doesn't answer the question, they want equal height, not centering the contents
    – Ryan M
    Feb 22 '16 at 16:47
0
.row-eq-height {
display: -webkit-box;
display: -webkit-flex;
display: -ms-flexbox;
display:         flex;
 }

From:

http://getbootstrap.com.vn/examples/equal-height-columns/equal-height-columns.css

states bootstrap but you do not need bootstrap to use this. Answering this old question, as this worked for me, and seems pretty easy to implement.

This was the same answer I provided to this Question

0

What worked for me was adding style={{ display: 'flex', overflowY: "auto" }} to all parents of the child and then style={{ overflowY: "auto" }} to the child itself.

-3

The easiest way to do this is to just fake it. A List Apart has covered this extensively over the years, like in this article from Dan Cederholm from 2004.

Here's how I usually do it:

<div id="container" class="clearfix" style="margin:0 auto;width:950px;background:white url(SOME_REPEATING_PATTERN.png) scroll repeat-y center top;">
    <div id="navigation" style="float:left;width:190px;padding-right:10px;">
        <!-- Navigation -->
    </div>
    <div id="content" style="float:left;width:750px;">
        <!-- Content -->
    </div>
</div>

You can easily add a header onto this design by wrapping #container in another div, embedding the header div as #container's sibling, and moving the margin and width styles to the parent container. Also, the CSS should be moved into a separate file and not kept inline, etc. etc. Finally, the clearfix class can be found on positioniseverything.