98

http://jsfiddle.net/S8g4E/

I have a container div with two children. The first child has a given height. How can I make the second child to occupy the "free space" of the container div without giving a specific height?

In the example, the pink div should occupy also the white space.


Similar to this question: How to make div occupy remaining height?

But I don't want to give position absolute.

145

Expanding the #down child to fill the remaining space of #container can be accomplished in various ways depending on the browser support you wish to achieve and whether or not #up has a defined height.

Samples

.container {
  width: 100px;
  height: 300px;
  border: 1px solid red;
  float: left;
}
.up {
  background: green;
}
.down {
  background: pink;
}
.grid.container {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-rows: 100px;
}
.flexbox.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}
.flexbox.container .down {
  flex-grow: 1;
}
.calc .up {
  height: 100px;
}
.calc .down {
  height: calc(100% - 100px);
}
.overflow.container {
  overflow: hidden;
}
.overflow .down {
  height: 100%;
}
<div class="grid container">
  <div class="up">grid
    <br />grid
    <br />grid
    <br />
  </div>
  <div class="down">grid
    <br />grid
    <br />grid
    <br />
  </div>
</div>
<div class="flexbox container">
  <div class="up">flexbox
    <br />flexbox
    <br />flexbox
    <br />
  </div>
  <div class="down">flexbox
    <br />flexbox
    <br />flexbox
    <br />
  </div>
</div>
<div class="calc container">
  <div class="up">calc
    <br />calc
    <br />calc
    <br />
  </div>
  <div class="down">calc
    <br />calc
    <br />calc
    <br />
  </div>
</div>
<div class="overflow container">
  <div class="up">overflow
    <br />overflow
    <br />overflow
    <br />
  </div>
  <div class="down">overflow
    <br />overflow
    <br />overflow
    <br />
  </div>
</div>

Grid

CSS's grid layout offers yet another option, though it may not be as straightforward as the Flexbox model. However, it only requires styling the container element:

.container { display: grid; grid-template-rows: 100px }

The grid-template-rows defines the first row as a fixed 100px height, and the remain rows will automatically stretch to fill the remaining space.

I'm pretty sure IE11 requires -ms- prefixes, so make sure to validate the functionality in the browsers you wish to support.

Flexbox

CSS3's Flexible Box Layout Module (flexbox) is now well-supported and can be very easy to implement. Because it is flexible, it even works when #up does not have a defined height.

#container { display: flex; flex-direction: column; }
#down { flex-grow: 1; }

It's important to note that IE10 & IE11 support for some flexbox properties can be buggy, and IE9 or below has no support at all.

Calculated Height

Another easy solution is to use the CSS3 calc functional unit, as Alvaro points out in his answer, but it requires the height of the first child to be a known value:

#up { height: 100px; }
#down { height: calc( 100% - 100px ); }

It is pretty widely supported, with the only notable exceptions being <= IE8 or Safari 5 (no support) and IE9 (partial support). Some other issues include using calc in conjunction with transform or box-shadow, so be sure to test in multiple browsers if that is of concern to you.

Other Alternatives

If older support is needed, you could add height:100%; to #down will make the pink div full height, with one caveat. It will cause overflow for the container, because #up is pushing it down.

Therefore, you could add overflow: hidden; to the container to fix that.

Alternatively, if the height of #up is fixed, you could position it absolutely within the container, and add a padding-top to #down.

And, yet another option would be to use a table display:

#container { width: 300px; height: 300px; border: 1px solid red; display: table;}
#up { background: green; display: table-row; height: 0; }
#down { background: pink; display: table-row;}​
  • 3
    I would like #down to have #container height - #up height. So overflow hidden is not what I'm looking for. And also don't want to use absolute position. Thanks! – Alvaro Jun 27 '12 at 12:22
  • @Alvaro, I've added another option, using table displays. Disadvantage here is compatibility. P.S. An element positioned absolutely inside a container with position: relative; positions it relative to the container, not the window. So, that should be a viable option. – webdevkit Jun 27 '12 at 12:25
  • 2
    Table-row should be working for you, see this jsFiddle for proof. The position absolute method, will not be able to yield the same results as this fiddle, so we can scratch that off the list (#down and #container will have the same height in that scenario). – webdevkit Jun 27 '12 at 12:38
  • 3
    You're asking a lot, @Alvaro. CSS is not a scripting language; it can't calculate stuff. You're stuck with either illusions or js. – Jezen Thomas Jun 27 '12 at 12:38
  • 1
    @Quantastical, thanks for your help, but in your latest edit you just copied the answer I posted. Some mention about it at least would be nice. – Alvaro Nov 25 '14 at 11:47
22

Its been almost two years since I asked this question. I just came up with css calc() that resolves this issue I had and thought it would be nice to add it in case someone has the same problem. (By the way I ended up using position absolute).

http://jsfiddle.net/S8g4E/955/

Here is the css

#up { height:80px;}
#down {
    height: calc(100% - 80px);//The upper div needs to have a fixed height, 80px in this case.
}

And more information about it here: http://css-tricks.com/a-couple-of-use-cases-for-calc/

Browser support: http://caniuse.com/#feat=calc

  • 1
    I, too, have been using CSS3's calc where wide browser support is not as important (IE8 and below and Safari 5 don't support it). – webdevkit Apr 20 '14 at 16:53
  • 1
    Any way to do similar with a dynamic #up height? – Adam Waite Aug 4 '14 at 13:49
  • @AdamWaite, with a dynamic #up height, you will want to use the overflow solution described in the other answer. – webdevkit Nov 24 '14 at 18:26
5

My answer uses only CSS, and it does not use overflow:hidden or display:table-row. It requires that the first child really does have a given height, but in your question you state that only the second child need have its height not specified, so I believe you should find this acceptable.

html

<div id="container">
    <div id="up">Text<br />Text<br />Text<br /></div>
    <div id="down">Text<br />Text<br />Text<br /></div>
</div>

css

#container { width: 300px; height: 300px; border:1px solid red;}
#up { background: green; height: 63px; float:left; width: 100% }
#down { background:pink; padding-top: 63px; height: 100%; box-sizing: border-box; }

http://jsfiddle.net/S8g4E/288/

2

check the demo - http://jsfiddle.net/S8g4E/6/

use css -

#container { width: 300px; height: 300px; border:1px solid red; display: table;}
#up { background: green; display: table-row; }
#down { background:pink; display: table-row;}
  • You should add height: 1px to #up to ensure it takes the minimum amount of height. Here's the browser support for display: table: caniuse.com/css-table – thirtydot Jun 27 '12 at 12:22
  • Could you please show me how can this solution be achieved in this "more complex" example, please: jsfiddle.net/fyNX4 Thank you very much – Alvaro Jun 27 '12 at 12:44
2

Unless I am misunderstanding, you can just add height: 100%; and overflow:hidden; to #down.

#down { 
    background:pink; 
    height:100%; 
    overflow:hidden;
}​

Live DEMO

Edit: Since you do not want to use overflow:hidden;, you can use display: table; for this scenario; however, it is not supported prior to IE 8. (display: table; support)

#container { 
    width: 300px; 
    height: 300px; 
    border:1px solid red;
    display:table;
}

#up { 
    background: green;
    display:table-row;
    height:0; 
}

#down { 
    background:pink;
    display:table-row;
}​

Live DEMO

Note: You have said that you want the #down height to be #container height minus #up height. The display:table; solution does exactly that and this jsfiddle will portray that pretty clearly.

  • I don't want #down to exceed #container height – Alvaro Jun 27 '12 at 12:20
  • I just noticed that. You can add overflow:hidden to to hide the extra content. – Josh Mein Jun 27 '12 at 12:22
  • I'll copy/paste what I said to MrSlayer: I would like #down to have #container height - #up height. So overflow hidden is not what I'm looking for. And also don't want to use absolute position. Thanks! – Alvaro Jun 27 '12 at 12:23
  • The problem with this is that if you revert the two divs in your example then the green div is outside. – Ced Sep 8 '15 at 22:44
  • This does not answer the question at all. It states "To occupy all of the remaining height", event though this occupies all of the remaining height, there will be overflow. – GriffinTaimer May 25 '16 at 8:00
1

You can use floats for pushing content down:

http://jsfiddle.net/S8g4E/5/

You have a fixed size container:

#container {
    width: 300px; height: 300px;
}

Content is allowed to flow next to a float. Unless we set the float to full width:

#up {
    float: left;
    width: 100%;
}

While #up and #down share the top position, #down's content can only start after the bottom of the floated #up:

#down {
    height:100%;
}​
  • Note that #up actually covers the top part of #down: jsfiddle.net/thirtydot/S8g4E/9 – thirtydot Jun 27 '12 at 12:24
  • Yes, that's how it works. But if OP doesn't need a rounded border or something other fancyness on #up, then it is probably acceptable. – user188421 Jun 27 '12 at 12:26
  • This solution is close, but I would like #down to have #container height - #up height. (In your solution #down height = #container height). Thanks' – Alvaro Jun 27 '12 at 12:26
  • 1
    @Alvaro: Why does it need to be like that? This solution looks correct in most cases, even if it is only an illusion. – thirtydot Jun 27 '12 at 12:27
  • Well, this question is a simplified example from this more "complex" example: jsfiddle.net/fyNX4 There wouldn't work, no? – Alvaro Jun 27 '12 at 12:36
-3

I'm not sure it can be done purely with CSS, unless you're comfortable in sort of faking it with illusions. Maybe use Josh Mein's answer, and set #container to overflow:hidden.

For what it's worth, here's a jQuery solution:

var contH = $('#container').height(),
upH = $('#up').height();
$('#down').css('height' , contH - upH);
  • Thanks I was looking for a pure Css solution. – Alvaro Jun 27 '12 at 12:28

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