15

I'm using SQL.

In a table tblDemo,one of the column is 'FileName'. Each row of this column contains a different filename with any extension. For ex. 'flower.jpeg', 'batman.mov', study.pdf etc.

Please suggest me on a query which could help me to remove the extension(and dot as well) from each row of the 'filenames' column. So that I could fetch only the name Ex. 'flower', 'batman', 'study' etc.

Thanks

1

5 Answers 5

43

try this one out:

UPDATE TableName
SET FileName = REVERSE(SUBSTRING(REVERSE(FileName), 
                       CHARINDEX('.', REVERSE(FileName)) + 1, LEN(FileName))

View For a DEMO @ SQLFiddle.com

4
  • 1
    u r champ. It worked. It indeed removes the extension from fileName, even if the filename has multiple 'dot' in it. I will edit your post just a bit, so that it would help any other in future.
    – Kings
    Jun 28, 2012 at 9:53
  • 5
    For MySQL users use LOCATE instead of CHARINDEX Mar 18, 2014 at 20:35
  • @JohnWoo whats the deal with the 999?
    – johnny 5
    Sep 30, 2020 at 19:22
  • 2
    @johnny5 999 is the start parameter for the string (filename). From w3schools.com/sql/func_sqlserver_charindex.asp: "The position where the search will start (if you do not want to start at the beginning of string). The first position in string is 1." If you have Strings inside your column that have more than 999 chars you have to modify this parameter. In most cases this number should be sufficient.
    – Douy789
    Aug 25, 2021 at 11:55
13

Tested on Sql Server. This shows the filenames without extension, change to Update / Set to modify data.

SELECT left([FileName], len([FileName]) - charindex('.', reverse([FileName]))) 
  FROM tblDemo

Edited: modified using Reverse, so it also works when the field contains multiple dots.

Here the Update Table version:

UPDATE Testing 
   Set [FileName] = left([FileName], 
                         len([FileName]) - charindex('.', Reverse([FileName])))
2
  • Ben/Jcis - what to modify in the mentioned query, to take account of the case similar to this:- 'This.Is.My.Filename.Txt'
    – Kings
    Jun 28, 2012 at 9:40
  • @Jcis - Thanks a lot friend. Just accepted John's answer 'coz he responded first that multiple dots issue. Your answer is absolutley correct.
    – Kings
    Jun 28, 2012 at 10:02
3

I needed to get rid of all extensions, i.e: .tar.gz or .txt.out. This is what worked for me in SQL Server:

CREATE FUNCTION RemoveFileExt
(
    @fullpath nvarchar(500)
)
RETURNS nvarchar(500)
AS
BEGIN
    IF(CHARINDEX('.', @fullpath) > 0)
    BEGIN
       SELECT @fullpath = SUBSTRING(@fullpath, 1, CHARINDEX('.', @fullpath)-1)
    END
    RETURN @fullpath
END;

CREATE FUNCTION RemoveFileExtAll
(
    @fullpath nvarchar(500)
)
RETURNS nvarchar(500)
AS
BEGIN
    IF(CHARINDEX('.', @fullpath) > 0)
    BEGIN
        SELECT @fullpath = dbo.RemoveFileExt(@fullpath)
    END
    RETURN @fullpath
END;

select dbo.RemoveFileExtAll('test.tar.gz');

OUTPUT> test

As a bonus, to get just the base name from the fully qualified path in Linux or Windows:

CREATE FUNCTION GetBaseName
(
    @fullpath nvarchar(500)
)
RETURNS nvarchar(500)
AS
BEGIN
    IF(CHARINDEX('/', @fullpath) > 0)
    BEGIN
       SELECT @fullpath = RIGHT(@fullpath, CHARINDEX('/', REVERSE(@fullpath)) -1)
    END
    IF(CHARINDEX('\', @fullpath) > 0)
    BEGIN
       SELECT @fullpath = RIGHT(@fullpath, CHARINDEX('\', REVERSE(@fullpath)) -1)
    END
    RETURN @fullpath
END;

select dbo.GetBaseName('/media/drive_D/test.tar.gz');

OUTPUT> test.tar.gz

select dbo.GetBaseName('D:/media/test.tar.gz');

OUTPUT> test.tar.gz

select dbo.GetBaseName('//network/media/test.tar.gz');

OUTPUT> test.tar.gz
0

Here is a simple select statement that returns the desired results:

 SELECT  [Filename], SUBSTRING([Filename], 1, charindex('.',[Filename])-1) as [New name] FROM [Table]
0

In MySQL, this work for me.

set @file = 'test1.test2.test3.docx';

SELECT      substring(@file, 1, (length(@file) - (length(substring_index(@file, '.', -1)) + 1))) as 'name_file',
            substring_index(@file, '.', -1) as 'extension';

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