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I wish to select elements at random from an array, where each element has a specific probability of being chosen. Is there an efficient way to do this, or possibly something built into Java that already accomplishes this?

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    Nothing built into the Java language that I am aware of. You might want to look into apache-commons-math (commons.apache.org/math), it has many helpful utilities classes for doing randomization. Also, you will likely get better answers to this question is you show people some code you've tried writting to solve the problem, or at least a generic algorithm to show that you've tryed to figure it out yourself. People don't usually appreciate questions where it appears you are asking us to do your work for you. ;) – Jesse Webb Jun 28 '12 at 17:51
  • Well I thought of a couple naive implementations that seemed to be fairly trivial yet expensive to use, sorry for not including my code! Thanks for the help, much appreciated :) – xlnc Jun 28 '12 at 17:55
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One way is to use weighted probabilities like this:

MyClass getRandomElement(MyClass[] elements)
{
    int totalWeight = 0;
    for (MyClass element : elements)
    {
       totalWeight += element.weight;
    }

    int position = new Random().nextInt(totalWeight);

    for (MyClass element : elements)
    {
       if (position < element.weight)
       {
           return element;
       }
       position -= element.weight;
    }
    throw new IllegalStateException("Should never get here");
}
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  • This seems like the best way to accomplish what I need, thank you very much :) – xlnc Jun 28 '12 at 18:01
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An O(log(n)) approach (this is ripped directly from an answer to a very similar question):

The usual technique is to transform the array into an array of cumulative sums:

 [10 60 5 25]  --> [10 70 75 100]

Pick a random number in the range from zero up to the cumulative total (in the example: 0 <= x < 100). Then, use bisection on the cumulative array to locate the index into the original array:

Random variable x      Index in the Cumulative Array      Value in Original Array
-----------------      -----------------------------      ----------------------
 0 <= x < 10                      0                            10
10 <= x < 70                      1                            60
70 <= x < 75                      2                             5
75 <= x < 100                     3                            25 

For example, if the random variable x is 4, bisecting the cumulative array gives a position index of 0 which corresponds to 10 in the original array.

And, if the random variable x is 72, bisecting the cumulative array gives a position index of 2 which corresponds to 5 in the original array.

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1

One way to do this would be to build an array with the items repeated as necessary to represent their probabilities. So if item A in the array had a probability of .3 and item B had a probability of .7, you could put them in an array of 10 items, with A being repeated 3 times and B being repeated 7.

Then you could use a random number generator to select an index from the array.

An alternative solution would be instead load each of the items and their probabilities into a data structure, having each probability represented as a range (i.e. item A could represent the range .5-.8), then generate a random value from 0-1 and grab the value for whatever range the random number falls into.

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1

If you encode the probability weight of selecting an element in an array (probably via a member variable of the Objects in the array) you could do the following:

  1. Assume you have elements with weights as integers.
  2. Sum all of the elements' weights.
  3. Create a random value between 1 and that weight.
  4. Walk through the array, counting up until you match the random value.

Example:

[1, 3, 2, 5, 2] Sum = 13 Random Roll = 5

element[0] .. (we have counted to 1)

element[1] .. (we have counted to 4)

element[2] .. (we have counted to 6) 6 > 5 thus we select 2.

Now, this takes O(n) time where n is the number of values in the array. A better way to do this for efficiency's sake is to place the values at the positions indicated by the values. This is kind of like:

[a, b, b, b, c, c, d, d, d, d, d, e, e].

Look up counting sort for better details on this; it allows for O(1) accessing.

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0

I personally like an approach using a NavigableMap. Such an approach looks like this

interface Weighted {
    public double getWeight();
}

class UnbalancedRandomizer <E extends Weighted> {
    private NavigableMap<Double, E> container = new TreeMap<>();

    UnbalancedRandomizer(E... elements) {
        for (E element : elements) {
            add(element);
        }
    }

    public void add(E element) {
        double offset = container.isEmpty() ? 0.0 : container.lastEntry().getKey();
        container.put(offset + element.getWeight(), element);
    }

    public E getRandom() {
        double rolled = container.lastEntry().getKey() * Math.random();
        return container.ceilingEntry(rolled).getValue();
    }
}

This, however, can become a little bit more tricky, when you want to remove an element or change the weight of an element. After all I believe in most usecases only add is really relevant. Those are mostly lookup tables for events to happen (e.g. slot machine symbol chance) or matchers for grouping properties like weight/size/age etc.

Example usage

class Foo implements Weighted {
    private double weight;
    private String name;

    public Foo(double weight, String name) {
        this.weight = weight;
        this.name = name;
    }

    @Override
    public double getWeight() {
        return weight;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Symbol{" +
                "weight=" + weight +
                ", name='" + name + '\'' +
                '}';
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {
        UnbalancedRandomizer<Foo> randomizer = new UnbalancedRandomizer(
                new Foo(10, "A"),
                new Foo(30, "B"),
                new Foo(50, "C"),
                new Foo(50, "D")
        );

        Stream.generate(randomizer::getRandom).limit(50).forEach(System.out::println);
    }
}

Example Output

Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=30.0, name='B'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=30.0, name='B'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=30.0, name='B'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=30.0, name='B'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=30.0, name='B'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=10.0, name='A'}
Symbol{weight=30.0, name='B'}
Symbol{weight=30.0, name='B'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=30.0, name='B'}
Symbol{weight=10.0, name='A'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=30.0, name='B'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='C'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
Symbol{weight=10.0, name='A'}
Symbol{weight=50.0, name='D'}
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