9

I have a form that is basically a calculator. you can type an equation in and it will evaluate it. I also have 2 memory fields(text boxes named m1 and m2) where you can type something in and it will hold that value and then when you are typing an expression in the first box, you can reference m1 or m2 in your equation and it will evaluate using the numbers you entered in the memory fields.

The problem is if you try to reference m1 or m2 in your equation and the text boxes are blank, You get an undefined error.

I've been spinning my wheels for hours to try and put some sort of check that if the equation is evaluated to undefined, just show a pop up box. I need this in raw javascript. any help is appreciated.

function displayResult(thisElement)
{
    thisElement.value = eval(thisElement.value); <!-- this line throws the error if you use m1 and no m1 is defined, m2 and no m2 is defined, etc -->
    if(!(thisElement.value>0))
    {
        thisElement.value=0;
    }
}

function mem(v) 
{
    v.value = eval(v.value);
    eval(v.name+"="+v.value);
}

<input id="calcFormula" name="calculate" size="40" />
<input type="submit" value="Calculate" onclick="displayResult(this.form.calculate);" />

<input name="m1" id="m1" size="12" onchange="mem(this);" value="0" />
<input name="m2" id="m2" size="12" onchange="mem(this);" value="0" />
3
  • Without looking too deep into the question, would there be a problem with checking to make sure that m1.value and m2.value are not undefined before trying to evaluate? EDIT: Okay, I can see now why that wouldn't work. I admit this is a lot more complex than it first appeared. Jun 28, 2012 at 21:36
  • You should really use a library like Knockout.js. This is just too messy. Jun 28, 2012 at 21:46
  • there is only like 10 lines of javascript here. I can almost guarantee that it would be more code to use knockout.js than raw js and i've never used knockout.js. Definitely feel free to prove me wrong and post it as an answer though.
    – Catfish
    Jun 29, 2012 at 14:12

2 Answers 2

12

I can think of three solutions:

  1. You can make an assumption that empty m1/m2 means 0, so there will never be an undefined value. This really simplifies things.
  2. You can use regexp to check first for any occurrence of m1 or m2 in the equation and if it exists then check if is undefined.
  3. But the best method is to use try...catch.

Try/Catch Example:

try {
    eval('12+3+m1');
} catch (e) {
    alert(e.message);
}
2
  • I was not aware that js had a try/catch function. Worked like a charm.
    – Catfish
    Jun 29, 2012 at 14:13
  • If we have a nested object reference in eval, and the nested prop is undefined then eval won't throw an error.
    – Dipak
    Aug 14, 2019 at 4:12
1

the evalfails because it needs to load the data from the form fields, but m1 is no access key for a form field., and m1 is no global variable, so it fails. create 2 global variables and let the m1 and m2 forms store their values in there on change.

your original script fails because your function evals m1 and m2, but they get destroyed when the function ends because they are not global scope

 function displayResult(thisElement) {    thisElement.value = eval(thisElement.value); <!--  this line throws the error if you use m1 and no m1 is defined, m2 and no m2 is defined, etc --> if(!(thisElement.value>0)) { thisElement.value=0; }    }
m1=0;
m2=0;

<input id="calcFormula" name="calculate" size="40" /> <input type="submit" value="Calculate" onclick="displayResult(this.form.calc ulate);" />

<input name="m1" id="m1" onchange="m1=this.value" size="12" value="0" /> <input name="m2" id="m2" size="12" onchange="m2=this.value;" value="0" />

Why your original code failed:

Step 1. M1 is stored in the form.
step 2. Onchange event is fired
step 3. Function mem(this) is called
step 4. Entering scope of function mem
step 5. Inserting this.name into string
step 6. Inserting this.value into string
Step 7. evalling string
step 7.1 found code m1=1
step 7.1.1 check window object for variable named m1
step 7.1.1.1 failed. Create local variable for function mem called m1
step 7.1.1.2 assign value 1 to scope variable m1
step 7.1.1.3 exit eval
step 7.1.1.4 exit function mem(this)
step 7.1.1.5 check for scoped variables
step 7.1.1.6 scoped variable found m1
step 7.1.1.7 destroy scoped variable and free up memory
step 7.1.2.2 passed. retrieve pointer to window object variable m1
step 7.1.2.3 assign value 1 to window.m1
step 7.1.2.4 exit eval
step 7.1.2.5 exit function mem(this)
step 7.1.2.6 check for scoped variables
step 7.1.2.7 none found, resume other tasks.
6
  • Wrong. It's not a scope issue at all. It's an issue of eval()'ing a name that doesn't exist.
    – Catfish
    Jun 29, 2012 at 14:13
  • it is a scope issue. When evalling withing a fuction, without globals, the evalled variables are scoped. His code evals the var names perfectly, but only in the scope of his function Jun 29, 2012 at 14:14
  • Then why does it work if there are values in m1 and m2? I only have issues when you never enter a value in m1 and m2. It's because they are undefined.
    – Catfish
    Jun 29, 2012 at 14:20
  • I'll edit my answer to show you why your original code doesn't work. Jun 29, 2012 at 14:32
  • I think you've made mistake in step 7.1.1.1/2. Example code at this point: eval("m1=5"); This creates global variable m1 because there is no var. Example code to create local variable m1: eval("var m1=5"); Jun 29, 2012 at 14:57

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