183

I want to capture the Ctrl+C (SIGINT) signal sent from the console and print out some partial run totals.

Is this possible in Golang?

Note: When I first posted the question I was confused about Ctrl+C being SIGTERM instead of SIGINT.

233

You can use the os/signal package to handle incoming signals. ^C is SIGINT, so you can use this to trap os.Interrupt.

c := make(chan os.Signal, 1)
signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt)
go func(){
    for sig := range c {
        // sig is a ^C, handle it
    }
}()

The manner in which you cause your program to terminate and print information is entirely up to you.

  • Thanks! So... ^C it's not SIGTERM, then? UPDATE: Sorry, the link you provided is detailed enough! – Sebastián Grignoli Jun 29 '12 at 21:51
  • 15
    Instead of for sig := range g {, you can also use <-sigchan as in this previous answer : stackoverflow.com/questions/8403862/… – Denys Séguret Jun 30 '12 at 7:34
  • 3
    @dystroy: Sure, if you're actually going to terminate the program in response to the first signal. By using the loop you can catch all the signals if you happen to decide not to terminate the program. – Lily Ballard Jun 30 '12 at 21:31
  • 72
    Note: you must actually build the program for this to work. If you run the program via go run in a console and send a SIGTERM via ^C, the signal is written into the channel and the program responds, but appears to drop out of the loop unexpectedly. This is because the SIGRERM goes to go run as well! (This has cause me substantial confusion!) – William Pursell Nov 17 '12 at 22:33
  • 5
    Note that in order for the goroutine to get processor time to handle the signal, the main goroutine must call a blocking operation or call runtime.Gosched in an appropriate place (in your program's main loop, if it has one) – misterbee Aug 4 '13 at 15:53
87

This works:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "os/signal"
    "syscall"
    "time" // or "runtime"
)

func cleanup() {
    fmt.Println("cleanup")
}

func main() {
    c := make(chan os.Signal)
    signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt, syscall.SIGTERM)
    go func() {
        <-c
        cleanup()
        os.Exit(1)
    }()

    for {
        fmt.Println("sleeping...")
        time.Sleep(10 * time.Second) // or runtime.Gosched() or similar per @misterbee
    }
}
  • 4
    +1 for using channels' syntax – Francesco Noferi Oct 6 '14 at 10:34
  • 1
    For other readers: Look at @adamonduty 's answer for an explanation as to why you want to catch os.Interrupt and syscall.SIGTERM It would have been nice to include his explanation in this answer, especially since he posted months before you. – Chris Nov 7 '16 at 16:48
  • 1
    Why are you using a non-blocking channel? Is this necessary? – Awn Apr 6 '17 at 16:23
  • 4
    @Barry why is the buffer size 2 instead of 1? – pdeva May 5 '17 at 5:34
  • 1
    Here's an excerpt from the documentation. "Package signal will not block sending to c: the caller must ensure that c has sufficient buffer space to keep up with the expected signal rate. For a channel used for notification of just one signal value, a buffer of size 1 is sufficient." – bmdelacruz Feb 9 '18 at 21:49
25

To add slightly to the other answers, if you actually want to catch SIGTERM (the default signal sent by the kill command), you can use syscall.SIGTERM in place of os.Interrupt. Beware that the syscall interface is system-specific and might not work everywhere (e.g. on windows). But it works nicely to catch both:

c := make(chan os.Signal, 2)
signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt, syscall.SIGTERM)
....
  • 7
    The signal.Notify function allows to specify several signals at once. Thus, you can simplify your code to signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt, syscall.SIGTERM). – jochen Aug 25 '13 at 13:31
  • I think I found that out after posting. Fixed! – adamlamar Aug 25 '13 at 19:55
  • 1
    What about os.Kill? – Awn Apr 6 '17 at 16:24
  • 2
    @Eclipse Great question! os.Kill corresponds to syscall.Kill, which is a signal that can be sent but not caught. Its equivalent to the command kill -9 <pid>. If you want to catch kill <pid> and gracefully shutdown, you have to use syscall.SIGTERM. – adamlamar Apr 7 '17 at 21:14
  • @adamlamar Ahh, that makes sense. Thanks! – Awn Apr 7 '17 at 21:44
17

There were (at time of posting) one or two little typos in the accepted answer above, so here's the cleaned up version. In this example I'm stopping the CPU profiler when receiving Ctrl+C.

// capture ctrl+c and stop CPU profiler                            
c := make(chan os.Signal, 1)                                       
signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt)                                     
go func() {                                                        
  for sig := range c {                                             
    log.Printf("captured %v, stopping profiler and exiting..", sig)
    pprof.StopCPUProfile()                                         
    os.Exit(1)                                                     
  }                                                                
}()    
  • 2
    Note that in order for the goroutine to get processor time to handle the signal, the main goroutine must call a blocking operation or call runtime.Gosched in an appropriate place (in your program's main loop, if it has one) – misterbee Aug 4 '13 at 15:54
7

All of the above seem to work when spliced in, but gobyexample's signals page has a really clean and complete example of signal capturing. Worth adding to this list.

  • this is such a wonderfully succinct example – anon58192932 Dec 5 '16 at 4:56
0

This is another version which work in case you have some tasks to cleanup. Code will leave clean up process in their method.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "os/signal"
    "syscall"

)



func main() {

    _,done1:=doSomething1()
    _,done2:=doSomething2()

    //do main thread


    println("wait for finish")
    <-done1
    <-done2
    fmt.Print("clean up done, can exit safely")

}

func doSomething1() (error, chan bool) {
    //do something
    done:=make(chan bool)
    c := make(chan os.Signal, 2)
    signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt, syscall.SIGTERM)
    go func() {
        <-c
        //cleanup of something1
        done<-true
    }()
    return nil,done
}


func doSomething2() (error, chan bool) {
    //do something
    done:=make(chan bool)
    c := make(chan os.Signal, 2)
    signal.Notify(c, os.Interrupt, syscall.SIGTERM)
    go func() {
        <-c
        //cleanup of something2
        done<-true
    }()
    return nil,done
}

in case you need to clean main function you need to capture signal in main thread using go func() as well.

-1

Death is a simple library that uses channels and a wait group to wait for shutdown signals. Once the signal has been received it will then call a close method on all of your structs that you want to cleanup.

  • 2
    So many lines of code and an external library dependecy to do what can be done in four lines of code? (as per accepted answer) – Jacob Oct 14 '16 at 6:54
-1

You can have a different goroutine that detects syscall.SIGINT and syscall.SIGTERM signals and relay them to a channel using signal.Notify. You can send a hook to that goroutine using a channel and save it in a function slice. When the shutdown signal is detected on the channel, you can execute those functions in the slice. This can be used to clean up the resources, wait for running goroutines to finish, persist data, or print partial run totals.

I wrote a small and simple utility to add and run hooks at shutdown. Hope it can be of help.

https://github.com/ankit-arora/go-utils/blob/master/go-shutdown-hook/shutdown-hook.go

You can do this in a 'defer' fashion.

example for shutting down a server gracefully :

srv := &http.Server{}

go_shutdown_hook.ADD(func() {
    log.Println("shutting down server")
    srv.Shutdown(nil)
    log.Println("shutting down server-done")
})

l, err := net.Listen("tcp", ":3090")

log.Println(srv.Serve(l))

go_shutdown_hook.Wait()
-2

Just for the record if somebody needs a way to handle signals on Windows. I had a requirement to handle from prog A calling prog B through os/exec but prog B never was able to terminate gracefully because sending signals through ex. cmd.Process.Signal(syscall.SIGTERM) or other signals are not supported on Windows. The way I handled is by creating a temp file as a signal ex. .signal.term through prog A and prog B needs to check if that file exists on interval base, if file exists it will exit the program and handle a cleanup if needed, I'm sure there are other ways but this did the job.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.