12

Currently, I am using something like this:

    try
    {
      dr = SQL.Execute(sql);

      if(dr != null) {
         while(dr.Read()) {
           CustomObject c = new CustomObject();
           c.Key = dr[0].ToString();
           c.Value = dr[1].ToString();
           c.Meta = dr[2].ToString();
           customerInfo.CustomerList.Add(c);
         }
      }
      else
      {
          customerInfo.ErrorDetails="No records found";
      } 

Instead of me doing the assigments manually, is there a way to do this mapping directly (assume that the column names match with the field names).

One requirement, however is that I want to do this by my current approach of using sql queries and not by using pure LINQ based approaches. For one, the SQL queries are big enough, involve complex JOINs and have been tested thoroughly so I don't want to introduce more bugs at the moment. Any suggestions?

  • 2
    Note that you can use LINQ with custom SQL queries, and it will automatically map the fields in the query result to the generic object type you provide. See DataContext.ExecuteQuery – mellamokb Jun 30 '12 at 2:46
  • @mellamokb: Can you show me how? Or at least point me to some resource or maybe what I should search for? – Legend Jun 30 '12 at 2:47
  • Take a look at the link I added, which is the specific method you would need. There are also examples on that page. – mellamokb Jun 30 '12 at 2:48
  • @mellamokb: Wow... please add this as an answer. It will help others looking for something similar. – Legend Jun 30 '12 at 2:48
  • 1
    Look at Dapper.NET written by Sam Saffron (while he worked at/on Stackoverflow) – marc_s Jun 30 '12 at 6:29
6

One simple solution would be to make a constructor for your CustomObject that takes a DataRow (from the example, so if it's another class, please correct me).

And in your new constructor, do as you do in your own example.

public CustomObject(DataRow row)
{
    Key = row[0].ToString();
    // And so on...
}

One other way would be to introduce generics, and make a new function in your SQL-class

Example (Took code from Passing arguments to C# generic new() of templated type):

// This function should reside in your SQL-class.
public IEnumerable<T> ExecuteObject<T>(string sql)
{
    List<T> items = new List<T>();
    var data = ExecuteDataTable(sql); // You probably need to build a ExecuteDataTable for your SQL-class.
    foreach(var row in data.Rows)
    {
        T item = (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), row);
        items.Add(item);
    }
    return items;
}

Example usage:

public IEnumerable<CustomObject> GetCustomObjects()
{
    return SQL.ExecuteObject<CustomObject>("SELECT * FROM CustomObject");
}

I have tested this code in LinqPad, it should work.

5

You can achieve by creating a generic method for your requirement. Also you can make your new method as the extension for the data table.

    public static List<T> ToList<T>(this DataTable table) where T : class, new()
{
    try
    {
        List<T> list = new List<T>();

        foreach (var row in table.AsEnumerable())
        {
            T obj = new T();

            foreach (var prop in obj.GetType().GetProperties())
            {
                try
                {
                    PropertyInfo propertyInfo = obj.GetType().GetProperty(prop.Name);
                    propertyInfo.SetValue(obj, Convert.ChangeType(row[prop.Name], propertyInfo.PropertyType), null);
                }
                catch
                {
                    continue;
                }
            }

            list.Add(obj);
        }

        return list;
    }
    catch
    {
        return null;
    }
}

}

Usage:

    DataTable dtCustomer = GetCustomers();
    List<CustomObject> CustomObjectList = dtCustomer.ToList<CustomObject>();
  • what does GetCustomers look like? – Demodave Dec 11 '18 at 22:04
4

You should look into MicroORMs. Unlike regular ORMs, that provide an SDL you must use, MicroORMs allow you to use your own SQL queries and only provide the mapping from SQL result sets to C# objects and from C# objects to SQL parameters.

My favorite is PetaPoco, which also provides a query builder that uses your own SQL but does some neat manipulation of parameter numbers.

3

Assumption: if you need objects only for serialization or simple ad-hoc output.

You can use ExpandoObject and SqlDataReader.GetSchemaTable() like this:

    private IEnumerable<dynamic> ReaderToAnonymmous(SqlCommand comm) {
        using (var reader = comm.ExecuteReader()) {
            var schemaTable = reader.GetSchemaTable();

            List<string> colnames = new List<string>();
            foreach (DataRow row in schemaTable.Rows) {
                colnames.Add(row["ColumnName"].ToString());
            }

            while (reader.Read()) {
                var data = new ExpandoObject() as IDictionary<string, Object>;
                foreach (string colname in colnames) {
                    var val = reader[colname];
                    data.Add(colname, Convert.IsDBNull(val) ? null : val);
                }

                yield return (ExpandoObject)data;
            }
        }
    }

Although there are posted faster solutions (i posted this as alternative lazy approach for ad-hoc SQL/Reader results/outputs).

  • this is awesome, exactly what i've been looking for. I'm console application that generates reports in excel from stored procedures, and with this piece of code i don't have to map the procedures within the application. Thank you. – v1n1akabozo May 5 '17 at 13:13
1

The following function accepts a SQL string and an object, it requires the object to have a property for each column in the select statement. The object must be instantiated.

public object SqlToSingleObject(string sSql, object o)
{
    MySql.Data.MySqlClient.MySqlDataReader oRead;
    using (ConnectionHelper oDb = new ConnectionHelper())
    {
        oRead = oDb.Execute(sSql);
        if (oRead.Read())
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < oRead.FieldCount; i++)
            {
                System.Reflection.PropertyInfo propertyInfo = o.GetType().GetProperty(oRead.GetName(i));
                propertyInfo.SetValue(o, Convert.ChangeType(oRead[i], propertyInfo.PropertyType), null);
            }

            return o;
        }
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}
  • Whats the point of that? If you are going to create all the poperties, why not just build the object yourself. – MattE Jul 25 '17 at 22:56

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