4

How do I get the exact dates of the last 7 days including today in a custom format (dd/mm)?

In the resulting array I would like to get something like (dates are examples only):

1=>11/2 (today minus 7 days)
2=>12/2 (today minus 6 days)
...
7=>17/2 (today)
1
  • And what have you tried?
    – sachleen
    Jun 30 '12 at 9:33
18
function getLastNDays($days, $format = 'd/m'){
    $m = date("m"); $de= date("d"); $y= date("Y");
    $dateArray = array();
    for($i=0; $i<=$days-1; $i++){
        $dateArray[] = '"' . date($format, mktime(0,0,0,$m,($de-$i),$y)) . '"'; 
    }
    return array_reverse($dateArray);
}

Usage:

$arr = getLastNDays(7);

or

$arr = getLastNDays(7, 'd/m/Y');
0
9

You can combine the 2 functions date() and strtotime(). for example:

echo date("Y-m-d", strtotime("7 days ago"));

Try:

for ($i=0; $i<7; $i++)
{
    echo date("d/m", strtotime($i." days ago")).'<br />';
}

You should be able to work out how to get them in the correct order and into an array :)

Hope that helps

0
5

time() gives you the current timestamp.
86400 seconds are one day (60 * 60 * 24).
date() gives you a custom date string.

for ($iDay = 6; $iDay >= 0; $iDay--) {
    $aDays[7 - $iDay] = date('d/m', time() - $iDay * 86400);
}

Also see this example.

If you don't want the leading zeros, use 'j/n' as custom date format parameter:

for ($iDay = 6; $iDay >= 0; $iDay--) {
    $aDays[7 - $iDay] = date('j/n', time() - $iDay * 86400);
}

Also see this updated example.

=== UPDATE ===

@Dagon's idea to use strtotime() to get the timestamp is great. Here the better solution:

for ($iDay = 6; $iDay >= 0; $iDay--) {
    $aDays[7 - $iDay] = date('j/n', strtotime("-" . $iDay . " day"));
}

And an example.

6
  • not all fays are 86400 long better to to use strtotime("-1 day")
    – user557846
    Jun 30 '12 at 10:08
  • there are leap seconds as well as leap days
    – user557846
    Jun 30 '12 at 10:17
  • @Dagon: Yes, your solution is more accurate. But leap days make no difference for the example above and leap seconds may be neglected because of their rarity.
    – scessor
    Jun 30 '12 at 10:25
  • "The next leap second will be inserted on June 30, 2012 at 23:59:60 UTC." that's not rare that's kind of soon!
    – user557846
    Jun 30 '12 at 10:27
  • Dagon is right. Consider this case. At the moment it’s Today 23:55. In 5 PM earlier this day DST rules changed clock -1 hour so this day is 1 hour longer and have 25 hours, not 24. That means 86400s ago is Today 00:55 not Yesterday 23:55.
    – Wh1T3h4Ck5
    Jun 30 '12 at 10:47

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