33

This program has the user input name/age pairs and then outputs them, using a class. Here is the code.

#include "std_lib_facilities.h"

class Name_pairs
{
public:
       bool test();
       void read_names();
       void read_ages();
       void print();
private:
        vector<string>names;
        vector<double>ages;
        string name;
        double age;
};

void Name_pairs::read_names()
{
     cout << "Enter name: ";
     cin >> name;
     names.push_back(name);
     cout << endl;
}

void Name_pairs::read_ages()
{
     cout << "Enter corresponding age: ";
     cin >> age;
     ages.push_back(age);
     cout << endl;
}

void Name_pairs::print()
{
     for(int i = 0; i < names.size() && i < ages.size(); ++i)
             cout << names[i] << " , " << ages[i] << endl;
}

bool Name_pairs::test()
{
   int i = 0;
   if(ages[i] == 0 || names[i] == "0") return false;
   else{
        ++i;
        return true;}
}


int main()
{
    cout << "Enter names and ages. Use 0 to cancel.\n";
    while(Name_pairs::test())
    {
     Name_pairs::read_names();
     Name_pairs::read_ages();
     }
     Name_pairs::print();
     keep_window_open();
}

However, in int main() when I'm trying to call the functions I get "cannot call 'whatever name is' function without object." I'm guessing this is because it's looking for something like variable.test or variable.read_names. How should I go about fixing this?

  • I wonder why you want the two vector data attributes (names, ages)? Is one instance going to be used for more than one pair? – 2785528 Jul 17 '18 at 14:00
  • Another thing to consider ... why the separate std::vector of names and ages instead of a single std::vector< Name_pairs >? – 2785528 Jul 17 '18 at 14:03
38

You need to instantiate an object in order to call its member functions. The member functions need an object to operate on; they can't just be used on their own. The main() function could, for example, look like this:

int main()
{
   Name_pairs np;
   cout << "Enter names and ages. Use 0 to cancel.\n";
   while(np.test())
   {
      np.read_names();
      np.read_ages();
   }
   np.print();
   keep_window_open();
}
27

If you want to call them like that, you should declare them static.

  • Not possible in this case since all the methods need the object context to access one or more of the member properties names, ages, name, age. (they could be static, too. But then it would be quite useless ;-)) – VolkerK Jul 14 '09 at 20:28
  • thank you. correct for my case. forgot to put the 'static' keyword – jondinham Aug 23 '12 at 3:53
2

You are right - you declared a new use defined type (Name_pairs) and you need variable of that type to use it.

The code should go like this:

Name_pairs np;
np.read_names()
1

just add static keyword at the starting of the function return type.. and then you can access the member function of the class without object:) for ex:

static void Name_pairs::read_names()
{
   cout << "Enter name: ";
   cin >> name;
   names.push_back(name);
   cout << endl;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.