57

As an exercise, does a method exist to redirect a string to a file without echo? Currently I am using

echo "Hello world" > test.txt

I know about cat and printf. I was thinking something like

> test.txt <<<"Hello world"

Of course this doesnt work, but maybe a similar command?

3
  • 5
    I have to wonder why you want this; echo and printf are both built-ins, so it can't be for speed reasons... Jul 1 '12 at 3:29
  • 1
    See Eric's answer below for one reason. May 20 '13 at 21:47
  • I don't want to use echo for files with very long lines
    – Olga
    Oct 4 '13 at 14:07
77

You can do this with "cat" and a here-document.

cat <<EOF > test.txt
some text
EOF

One reason for doing this would be to avoid any possibility of a password being visible in the output of ps. However, in bash and most modern shells, "echo" is a built-in command and it won't show up in ps output, so using something like this is safe (ignoring any issues with storing passwords in files, of course):

echo "$password" > test.txt
1
  • Yeah built-in won't appear in process list, I also prefer this approach with heredoc which removes the need for escaping quotes, also command substitution and variables can be used with ease. Like some text: $(here I run a command and fetch a value to display)
    – user3905644
    Aug 28 '18 at 15:37
19

I had the problem not being able to send ">" and ended up with echo!

echo "Hello world" | dd of=test.txt
2
  • This is a wonderful trick. Thank you so much for reminding me that dd is so useful! Sep 2 '16 at 18:54
  • 1
    Can be useful if you need to sudo write into some protected file. sudo on echo wouldn't work, I usually prefer echo some stuff | sudo tee /etc/some/protectedFile . I think in this case | sudo dd of=/etc/protectedFile also would work. Beware of dd it can write into block devices when used with sudo and wipe out disks :)
    – user3905644
    Aug 28 '18 at 15:35
6

There are multiple ways to do it, let's run this script called exercise.sh

#!/usr/bin/env bash

> file1.txt cat <<< "This is a here-string with random value $RANDOM"

# Or if you prefer to see what is happening and write to file as well
tee file2.txt <<< "Here is another here-string I can see and write to file"

# if you want to work multiline easily
cat <<EOF > file3.txt
You don't need to escape any quotes here, $ marks start of variables, unless escaped.
This is random value from variable $RANDOM
This is literal \$RANDOM
EOF

# Let's say you have a variable with multiline text and you want to manipulate it
a="
1
2
3
33
"

# Assume I want to have lines containing "3". Instead of grep it can even be another script
a=$(echo "$a" | grep 3)

# Then you want to write this to a file, although here-string is fine,
# if you don't need single-liner command, prefer heredoc
# Herestring. (If it's single liner, variable needs to be quoted to preserve newlines)
> file4.txt cat <<< "$a"
# Heredoc
cat <<EOF > file5.txt
$a
EOF

This is the output you should see:

$ bash exercise.sh
Here is another here-string I can see and write to file

And files should contain these:

$ ls
exercise.sh  file1.txt  file2.txt  file3.txt  file4.txt  file5.txt
$ cat file1.txt
This is a here-string with random value 20914
$ cat file2.txt
Here is another here-string I can see and write to file
$ cat file3.txt
You don't need to escape any quotes here, $ marks start of variables, unless escaped.
This is random value from variable 15899
This is literal $RANDOM
$ cat file4.txt
3
33
$ cat file5.txt
3
33
3
  • If I follow your instructions I can verify that my $a has multi-line text, but file.txt doesn't... Aug 28 '18 at 8:33
  • @DanielGruszczyk yeah I see some problems with it. I will fix it.
    – user3905644
    Aug 28 '18 at 15:16
  • @DanielGruszczyk if these are not useful for your use-cases, let me know I will add a solution here.
    – user3905644
    Aug 28 '18 at 15:33
5

There are way too many ways to possibly discuss that you probably don't care about. You can hack of course - strace bash, or do all sorts of black magic running Bash in gdb.

You actually have two completely different examples there. <<<'string' is already writing a string to a file. If anything is acceptable other than printf, echo, and cat, you can use many other commands to behave like cat (sed, awk, tee, etc).

$ cp /dev/stdin ./tmpfooblah <<<'hello world'; cat tmpfooblah
hello world

Or hell, depending on how you've compiled Bash.

$ enable -f /usr/lib/bash/print print; print 'hello world' >tmpfile

If you want to use only bash strings and redirection, in pure bash, with no hacking, and no loadables, it is not possible. In ksh93 however, it is possible.

 $ rm tmpfooblah; <<<'hello world' >tmpfooblah <##@(&!()); cat tmpfooblah
 hello world
4

The way to do this in bash is

zsh <<< '> test <<< "Hello World!"'

This is one of the interesting differences between zsh and bash: given an unchained > or >>, zsh has the good sense to hook it up to stdin, while bash does not. It would be downright useful - if it were only standard. I tried to use this to send & append my ssh key over ssh to a remote authorized_keys file, but the remote host was bash, of course, and quietly did nothing.

And that's why you should just use cat.

1
  • 1
    This is not how to do it in bash, this is how to do it in zsh and let it be executed through bash. Aug 9 '21 at 11:23
3
awk ' BEGIN { print "Hello, world" } ' > test.txt

would do it

3

I've a solution for bash purists.

The function 'define' helps us to assign a multiline value to a variable. This one takes one positional parameter: the variable name to assign the value.

In the heredoc, optionally there're parameter expansions too!

#!/bin/bash

define ()
{
  IFS=$'\n' read -r -d '' $1
}

BUCH="Matthäus 1"

define TEXT<<EOT
Aus dem Buch: ${BUCH}

1 Buch des Geschlechts Jesu Christi, des Sohnes Davids, des Sohnes Abrahams.
2 Abraham zeugte Isaak; Isaak aber zeugte Jakob, Jakob aber zeugte Juda und seine Brüder;
3 Juda aber zeugte Phares und Zara von der Thamar; Phares aber zeugte Esrom, Esrom aber zeugte Aram,

4 Aram aber zeugte Aminadab, Aminadab aber zeugte Nahasson, Nahasson aber zeugte Salmon,
5 Salmon aber zeugte Boas von der Rahab; Boas aber zeugte Obed von der Ruth; Obed aber zeugte Isai,
6 Isai aber zeugte David, den König. David aber zeugte Salomon von der, die Urias Weib gewesen; 

EOT

define TEXTNOEXPAND<<"EOT" # or define TEXTNOEXPAND<<'EOT'
Aus dem Buch: ${BUCH}

1 Buch des Geschlechts Jesu Christi, des Sohnes Davids, des Sohnes Abrahams.
2 Abraham zeugte Isaak; Isaak aber zeugte Jakob, Jakob aber zeugte Juda und seine Brüder;
3 Juda aber zeugte Phares und Zara von der Thamar; Phares aber zeugte Esrom, Esrom aber zeugte Aram,


4 Aram aber zeugte Aminadab, Aminadab aber zeugte Nahasson, Nahasson aber zeugte Salmon,
5 Salmon aber zeugte Boas von der Rahab; Boas aber zeugte Obed von der Ruth; Obed aber zeugte Isai,
6 Isai aber zeugte David, den König. David aber zeugte Salomon von der, die Urias Weib gewesen; 

EOT

OUTFILE="/tmp/matthäus_eins"

# Create file
>"$OUTFILE"

# Write contents
{
   printf "%s\n" "$TEXT"
   printf "%s\n" "$TEXTNOEXPAND"
} >>"$OUTFILE" 

Be lucky!

1
  • This is a very nice solution....I needed to ouput a file without the variables being expanded in the file so this was exactly what I needed.
    – KoZm0kNoT
    Jun 10 '21 at 18:30
2

Only redirection won't work, since there's nothing to connect the now-open file descriptors. So no, there is no way like this.

1

Interestingly, I had this problem too...so I search and found this thread....I found that this worked well for me:

echo "Hello world" | grep "" > test.txt

However - When I had closed that terminal and opened a new one, I discovered that the problem went away! I wish I had kept that terminal open to compare the settings. My current terminal is a bash shell. Not sure what caused that issue to begin with - anyone?

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