4

I'm using Eclipse 4.2 with resource leak warnings enabled.

This code produces an, in my opinion false, resource leak warning.

    public static void test(){
    InputStream in = null;
try {
    in = new FileInputStream("A");
} catch (IOException e) {
    return;
}finally{
    close(in);
}
}

public static void close(Closeable closeable) {
if (closeable != null) {
    try {
        closeable.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
}

If I refactor the code, and pull the close method into the finally block, everything is fine.

    public static void test2(){
    InputStream in = null;
try {
    in = new FileInputStream("A");
} catch (IOException e) {
    return;
}finally{
    if (in != null) {
        try {
            in.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace()
        }
    }
}
}

Can I somehow remove these warnings without having to duplicate the code of the close method and without having to disable the resource leak warnings?

I found a bug report here for something similar occuring in loops, but no loops exist in my code.

3
  • You should be seeing a 'Potential resource leak...' warning, if not please open a bug.
  • The main issue here is that the compiler does not know what 'close(..)' method does. It may or may not close the resource. (Note that the compiler does not perform inter-procedural analysis)
  • You can choose to ignore 'Potential resource leak' warnings. ('Resource leak' warnings are guaranteed to be correct however the 'Potential... ' ones are not)

More details on the resource leak analysis can be found here - http://help.eclipse.org/juno/index.jsp?topic=%2Forg.eclipse.jdt.doc.user%2Ftasks%2Ftask-avoiding_resource_leaks.htm&cp=1_3_9_1

EDIT: A word on 'Resource leak' vs 'Potential resource leak'

  • The idea is that all reported 'Resource leak' warnings are guaranteed to be correct but may not be 'all' the resource leaks in the code base.
  • 'Potential resource leaks' are well... potential problems. Some developers turn on 'Potential...' warnings when they know something is going wrong but they do not know where. In such cases potential warnings help to narrow down the search. Some other developers just go over potential warnings from time to time to see if there is a real problem there.

Ideally we would want the compiler to give us the complete and correct set of problems, but there are limitations in achieving that :-)

  • Thanks, I though the compiler checks might be smart enough to at least analyze static methods. Are these checks being improved some time soon? Because if the only way to use resource checks is to create tonnes of duplicate close routines, then it won't improve code quality. The close call is nearly never just one line, but has some null-pointer checks and try-catch for errors while closing, therefore it is only reasonable to factor that stuff into a separate method... – Franz Kafka Jul 2 '12 at 12:03
  • 1
    I understand your point of view and it is a valid concern. However, there are limitations with respect to inter-procedural static analysis e.g. you face similar situation with 'Potential null pointer access' warnings. – Deepak Azad Jul 2 '12 at 12:38
  • 2
    A big issue with expecting the compiler to do inter-procedural analysis in cases like this is proving whether the analysis will still be valid at some point later at runtime. Let's say this close method is located in a separate utilities class. The utilities class can be replaced post compilation with another class whose close method does not actually close anything. The compiler cannot prove that this case cannot occur, so you get correctly warned about a potential resource leak at runtime. – Konstantin Komissarchik Jul 2 '12 at 17:25
  • 3
    @Konstantin Komissarchik, your argument, if applied universally, should prevent any use of any library altogether, am i right? I think it would do good, if Eclipse recognized e.g. Guava's Closeables – Piotr Findeisen Aug 15 '12 at 2:41
  • 1
    There ought to be an annotation for parameters that indicate the parameter will be closed by the called method. – Barry Kelly Jan 30 '14 at 11:19
1

Good news: Eclipse 4.3 will recognise Google & Apache close utilities!

http://download.eclipse.org/eclipse/downloads/drops4/S-4.3M4-201212140730/news/

(Search "Leak analysis")

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.