4154

I have an array of JavaScript objects:

var objs = [ 
    { first_nom: 'Laszlo', last_nom: 'Jamf'     },
    { first_nom: 'Pig',    last_nom: 'Bodine'   },
    { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Prentice' }
];

How can I sort them by the value of last_nom in JavaScript?

I know about sort(a,b), but that only seems to work on strings and numbers. Do I need to add a toString() method to my objects?

1
  • 4
    Case sensitive or case insensitive sort? Commented Dec 10, 2022 at 22:18

61 Answers 61

10

Using Ramda,

npm install ramda

import R from 'ramda'
var objs = [ 
    { first_nom: 'Lazslo', last_nom: 'Jamf'     },
    { first_nom: 'Pig',    last_nom: 'Bodine'   },
    { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Prentice' }
];
var ascendingSortedObjs = R.sortBy(R.prop('last_nom'), objs)
var descendingSortedObjs = R.reverse(ascendingSortedObjs)
1
  • What is Ramda? Can you add a reference to it (e.g., a (non-naked) link)? (But ******* without ******* "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Commented Dec 10, 2022 at 21:27
9
function compare(propName) {
    return function(a,b) {
        if (a[propName] < b[propName])
            return -1;
        if (a[propName] > b[propName])
            return 1;
        return 0;
    };
}

objs.sort(compare("last_nom"));
1
  • 2
    Please consider editing your post to add more explanation about what your code does and why it will solve the problem. An answer that mostly just contains code (even if it's working) usually wont help the OP to understand their problem.
    – Drenmi
    Commented Oct 29, 2015 at 18:16
9

You can use a reusable sort function.

Array.prototype.order = function (prop, methods = {}) {
    if (prop?.constructor == Object) {
        methods = prop;
        prop = null;
    }
    const [orderType_a, orderType_b] = methods.reverse ? [1, -1] : [-1, 1];

    const $ = x => prop
        ? methods.insensitive
            ? String(x[prop]).toLowerCase()
            : x[prop]
        : methods.insensitive
            ? String(x).toLowerCase()
            : x;

    const fn = (a, b) => $(a) < $(b) ? orderType_a : $(b) < $(a) ? orderType_b : 0;
    return this.sort(fn);
};

It can be used to sort both arrays and objects in the array.

let items = [{ x: "Z" }, 3, "1", "0", 2, { x: "a" }, { x: 0 }];
items
    .order("x", { insensitive: 1 })
    // [ { x: 0 }, { x: 'a' }, 3, '1', '0', 2, { x: 'Z' } ]
    .order({ reverse: 1 })
    // [ { x: 0 }, { x: 'a' }, 3, 2, { x: 'Z' }, '1', '0' ]
    .sort(x => typeof x == "string" || typeof x == "number" ? -1 : 0)
    // [ '0', '1', 2, 3, { x: 0 }, { x: 'a' }, { x: 'Z' } ]

1nd (optional) > to sort object contain in array.
2rd is method > { reverse: any, insensitive: any }

8

This is a simple problem. I don't know why people have such complex solutions.

A simple sort function (based on the quicksort algorithm):

function sortObjectsArray(objectsArray, sortKey)
{
    // Quick Sort:
    var retVal;

    if (1 < objectsArray.length)
    {
        var pivotIndex = Math.floor((objectsArray.length - 1) / 2);  // Middle index
        var pivotItem = objectsArray[pivotIndex];                    // Value in the middle index
        var less = [], more = [];

        objectsArray.splice(pivotIndex, 1);                          // Remove the item in the pivot position
        objectsArray.forEach(function(value, index, array)
        {
            value[sortKey] <= pivotItem[sortKey] ?                   // Compare the 'sortKey' proiperty
                less.push(value) :
                more.push(value) ;
        });

        retVal = sortObjectsArray(less, sortKey).concat([pivotItem], sortObjectsArray(more, sortKey));
    }
    else
    {
        retVal = objectsArray;
    }

    return retVal;
}

Use example:

var myArr =
        [
            { val: 'x', idx: 3 },
            { val: 'y', idx: 2 },
            { val: 'z', idx: 5 },
        ];

myArr = sortObjectsArray(myArr, 'idx');
3
  • 6
    How is implementing quick sort in js a simple solution? Simple algorithm but not a simple solution.
    – Andrew
    Commented Nov 23, 2015 at 22:46
  • It simple since it don't use any outer libraries and it don't change the object's prototype. In my opinion, the length of the code don't have direct impact on the code's complexity Commented Nov 24, 2015 at 12:02
  • 3
    Well, let me try with different words: How reinventing the wheel is a simple solution?
    – Roberto14
    Commented Dec 9, 2015 at 17:36
8

Acording your example, you need to sort by two fields (last name, first name), rather than one. You can use the Alasql library to make this sort in one line:

var res = alasql('SELECT * FROM ? ORDER BY last_nom, first_nom',[objs]);

Try this example at JSFiddle.

0
7

Simple answer:

objs.sort((a,b)=>a.last_nom.localeCompare(b.last_nom))

Details:

Today it is very simple, You can compare strings with localeCompare. As the Mozilla Doc says:

The localeCompare() method returns a number indicating whether a reference string comes before, or after, or is the same as the given string in sort order.

    //example1:
    console.log("aaa".localeCompare("aab")); //-1
    console.log("aaa".localeCompare("aaa")); //0
    console.log("aab".localeCompare("aaa")); //1

    //example2:
    const a = 'réservé'; // with accents, lowercase
    const b = 'RESERVE'; // no accents, uppercase

    console.log(a.localeCompare(b));
    // expected output: 1
    console.log(a.localeCompare(b, 'en', { sensitivity: 'base' }));
    // expected output: 0

For more details see Mozilla doclocaleCompare:

7

Way 1:

You can use Underscore.js. Import underscore first.

 import * as _ from 'underscore';
 let SortedObjs = _.sortBy(objs, 'last_nom');

Way 2: Use a compare function.

function compare(first, second) {
     if (first.last_nom < second.last_nom)
         return -1;
     if (first.last_nom > second.last_nom)
       return 1;
    return 0;
 }

objs.sort(compare);
7
let propName = 'last_nom';

let sorted_obj = objs.sort((a,b) => {
    if(a[propName] > b[propName]) {
        return 1;
    }
    if (a[propName] < b[propName]) {
        return -1;
    }
    return 0;
}

//This works because the js built-in sort function allows us to define our
//own way of sorting, this funny looking function is simply telling `sort` how to
//determine what is larger. 
//We can use `if(a[propName] > b[propName])` because string comparison is already built into JS
//if you try console.log('a' > 'z' ? 'a' : 'z')
//the output will be 'z' as 'a' is not greater than 'z'
//The return values 0,-1,1 are how we tell JS what to sort on. We're sorting on the last_nom property of the object. 
//When sorting a list it comes down to comparing two items and how to determine which one of them is "larger". 
//We need a way to tell JS how to determine which one is larger. 
//The sort defining function will use the case that returns a 1 to mean that a > b
//and the case that returns -1 to mean that a < b

4
  • 1
    can you briefly describe the return values 1, -1, 0 a bit? Commented Nov 22, 2022 at 12:24
  • 1
    It is how we tell JS what to sort on. We're sorting on the last_nom property of the object. When sorting a list it comes down to comparing two items and how to determine which one of them is "larger". We need a way to tell JS how to determine which one is larger. The sort defining function will use the case that returns a 1 to mean that a > b and the case that returns -1 is the case that a < b. Commented Nov 22, 2022 at 16:25
  • 1
    Can you add it to the answer (comments may be deleted at any time)? But ********************** without ********************** "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today. Commented Dec 10, 2022 at 19:13
  • @stuckoverflow See also Intl.Collator.prototype.compare() > Description: "The compare getter function returns a number indicating how string1 and string2 compare to each other according to the sort order of this Intl.Collator object: a negative value if string1 comes before string2; a positive value if string1 comes after string2; 0 if they are considered equal.". Commented Jun 11, 2023 at 0:19
5

It works for me. Here It will keep undefined to the end.

 function sort(items, property, direction) {

    function compare(a, b) {
      if(!a[property] && !b[property]) {
        return 0;
      } else if(a[property] && !b[property]) {
        return -1;
      } else if(!a[property] && b[property]) {
        return 1;
      } else {
        const value1 = a[property].toString().toUpperCase(); // ignore upper and lowercase
        const value2 = b[property].toString().toUpperCase(); // ignore upper and lowercase
        if (value1 < value2) {
          return direction === 0 ? -1 : 1;
        } else if (value1 > value2) {
          return direction === 0 ? 1 : -1;
        } else {
          return 0;
        }
        
      }
    }
    
    return items.sort(compare);
   } 
   
   var items = [
  { name: 'Edward', value: 21 },
  { name: 'Sharpe', value: 37 },
  { name: 'And', value: 45 },
  { name: 'The', value: -12 },
  { name: undefined, value: -12 },
  { name: 'Magnetic', value: 13 },
  { name: 'Zeros', value: 37 }
];
   console.log('Ascending Order:- ');
   console.log(sort(items, 'name', 0));
   console.log('Decending Order:- ');
   console.log(sort(items, 'name', 1));
    
    

5

I've been using this utility in a variety of projects and it works great. It's very modular too:

  • Pass the name of the key to sort by
  • Choose if the sorting is ascending or descending

sortArrayOfObjsByKeyUtil.js

// Sort array of objects by key
// ------------------------------------------------------------
const sortArrayOfObjsByKey = (array, key, ascdesc) =>
  array.sort((a, b) => {
    const x = a[key];
    const y = b[key];
    if (ascdesc === 'asc') {
      return x < y ? -1 : x > y ? 1 : 0;
    }
    if (ascdesc === 'desc') {
      return x > y ? -1 : x < y ? 1 : 0;
    }
    return null;
  });

sortArrayOfObjsByKeyUtil.test.js

import sortArrayOfObjsByKey from './sortArrayOfObjsByKeyUtil';

const unsortedArray = [
  {
    _id: '3df55221-ce5c-4147-8e14-32effede6133',
    title: 'Netlife Design',
    address: {
      PostalAddress: {
        streetAddress: 'Youngstorget 3',
        addressLocality: 'Oslo',
        addressRegion: null,
        postalCode: '0181',
        addressCountry: 'Norway',
      },
    },
    geopoint: { lat: 59.914322, lng: 10.749272 },
  },
  {
    _id: 'cd00459f-3755-49f1-8847-66591ef935b2',
    title: 'Home',
    address: {
      PostalAddress: {
        streetAddress: 'Stockfleths gate 58A',
        addressLocality: 'Oslo',
        addressRegion: null,
        postalCode: '0461',
        addressCountry: 'Norway',
      },
    },
    geopoint: { lat: 59.937316, lng: 10.751862 },
  },
];

const sortedArray = [
  {
    _id: 'cd00459f-3755-49f1-8847-66591ef935b2',
    title: 'Home',
    address: {
      PostalAddress: {
        streetAddress: 'Stockfleths gate 58A',
        addressLocality: 'Oslo',
        addressRegion: null,
        postalCode: '0461',
        addressCountry: 'Norway',
      },
    },
    geopoint: { lat: 59.937316, lng: 10.751862 },
  },
  {
    _id: '3df55221-ce5c-4147-8e14-32effede6133',
    title: 'Netlife Design',
    address: {
      PostalAddress: {
        streetAddress: 'Youngstorget 3',
        addressLocality: 'Oslo',
        addressRegion: null,
        postalCode: '0181',
        addressCountry: 'Norway',
      },
    },
    geopoint: { lat: 59.914322, lng: 10.749272 },
  },
];

describe('sortArrayOfObjsByKey', () => {
  it(`sort array by 'title' key, ascending`, () => {
    const testInput = sortArrayOfObjsByKey(unsortedArray, 'title', 'asc');
    const testOutput = sortedArray;
    expect(testInput).toEqual(testOutput);
  });
});

5

Sort an array of objects

// Data
var booksArray = [
    { first_nom: 'Lazslo', last_nom: 'Jamf'     },
    { first_nom: 'Pig',    last_nom: 'Bodine'   },
    { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Prentice' }
];

// Property to sort by
var args = "last_nom";

// Function to sort the data by the given property
function sortByProperty(property) {
    return function (a, b) {
        var sortStatus = 0,
            aProp = a[property].toLowerCase(),
            bProp = b[property].toLowerCase();
        if (aProp < bProp) {
            sortStatus = -1;
        } else if (aProp > bProp) {
            sortStatus = 1;
        }
        return sortStatus;
    };
}

// Implementation
var sortedArray = booksArray.sort(sortByProperty(args));

console.log("sortedArray: " + JSON.stringify(sortedArray) );

Console log output:

"sortedArray: 
[{"first_nom":"Pig","last_nom":"Bodine"},
{"first_nom":"Lazslo","last_nom":"Jamf"},
{"first_nom":"Pirate","last_nom":"Prentice"}]"

Adapted based on this source: Code Snippet: How to Sort An Array of JSON Objects By Property

5

Using xPrototype's sortBy:

var o = [
  { Name: 'Lazslo', LastName: 'Jamf'     },
  { Name: 'Pig',    LastName: 'Bodine'   },
  { Name: 'Pirate', LastName: 'Prentice' },
  { Name: 'Pag',    LastName: 'Bodine'   }
];


// Original
o.each(function (a, b) { console.log(a, b); });
/*
 0 Object {Name: "Lazslo", LastName: "Jamf"}
 1 Object {Name: "Pig", LastName: "Bodine"}
 2 Object {Name: "Pirate", LastName: "Prentice"}
 3 Object {Name: "Pag", LastName: "Bodine"}
*/


// Sort By LastName ASC, Name ASC
o.sortBy('LastName', 'Name').each(function(a, b) { console.log(a, b); });
/*
 0 Object {Name: "Pag", LastName: "Bodine"}
 1 Object {Name: "Pig", LastName: "Bodine"}
 2 Object {Name: "Lazslo", LastName: "Jamf"}
 3 Object {Name: "Pirate", LastName: "Prentice"}
*/


// Sort by LastName ASC and Name ASC
o.sortBy('LastName'.asc, 'Name'.asc).each(function(a, b) { console.log(a, b); });
/*
 0 Object {Name: "Pag", LastName: "Bodine"}
 1 Object {Name: "Pig", LastName: "Bodine"}
 2 Object {Name: "Lazslo", LastName: "Jamf"}
 3 Object {Name: "Pirate", LastName: "Prentice"}
*/


// Sort by LastName DESC and Name DESC
o.sortBy('LastName'.desc, 'Name'.desc).each(function(a, b) { console.log(a, b); });
/*
 0 Object {Name: "Pirate", LastName: "Prentice"}
 1 Object {Name: "Lazslo", LastName: "Jamf"}
 2 Object {Name: "Pig", LastName: "Bodine"}
 3 Object {Name: "Pag", LastName: "Bodine"}
*/


// Sort by LastName DESC and Name ASC
o.sortBy('LastName'.desc, 'Name'.asc).each(function(a, b) { console.log(a, b); });
/*
 0 Object {Name: "Pirate", LastName: "Prentice"}
 1 Object {Name: "Lazslo", LastName: "Jamf"}
 2 Object {Name: "Pag", LastName: "Bodine"}
 3 Object {Name: "Pig", LastName: "Bodine"}
*/
4

Using Lodash or Underscore.js, it’s a piece of cake:

const sortedList = _.orderBy(objs, [last_nom], [asc]); // Ascending or descending
3

It is also possible to make a dynamic sorting function when programming in TypeScript, but the types become more tricky in this case.

function sortByKey<O>(key: keyof O, decending: boolean = false): (a: O, b: O) => number {
    const order = decending ? -1 : 1;
    return (a, b): number => {
        const valA = a[key];
        const valB = b[key];
        if (valA < valB) {
            return -order;
        } else if (valA > valB) {
            return order;
        } else {
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

This can be used in TypeScript as the following:

const test = [
    {
        id: 0,
    },
    {
        id: 2,
    }
]

test.sort(sortByKey('id')) // OK
test.sort(sortByKey('id1')) // ERROR
test.sort(sortByKey('')) // ERROR
3

Deep

Based on this excellent tutorial, I would like to develop Vlad Bezden's answer and explain why localeCompare is better than the standard comparison methods, like strA > strB. Let’s run this example:

console.log( 'Österreich' > 'Zealand' );  // We expect false
console.log( 'a' > 'Z' );                 // We expect false

The reason is that in JavaScript all strings are encoded using UTF-16 and

let str = '';

// Order of characters in JavaScript
for (let i = 65; i <= 220; i++) {
  str += String.fromCodePoint(i); // Code to character
}

console.log(str);

Capital letters go first (have small codes) and then go small letters and then go character Ö (after z). This is the reason why we get true in the first snippet - because operator > compares characters codes.

As you can see, compare characters in different languages is a nontrivial task - but luckily, modern browsers support the internationalization standard ECMA-402. So in JavaScript we have strA.localeCompare(strB) which does the job (-1 means strA is less than strB; 1 means the opposite; 0 means equal)

console.log( 'Österreich'.localeCompare('Zealand') ); // We expect -1
console.log( 'a'.localeCompare('Z') );                // We expect -1

I would like to add that localeCompare supports two parameters: language and additional rules:

var objs = [
    { first_nom: 'Lazslo', last_nom: 'Jamf'     },
    { first_nom: 'Pig',    last_nom: 'Bodine'   },
    { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Prentice' },
    { first_nom: 'Test',   last_nom: 'jamf'     }
];

objs.sort((a,b)=> a.last_nom.localeCompare(b.last_nom,'en',{sensitivity:'case'}))

console.log(objs);

// in '>' comparison 'Jamf' will NOT be next to 'jamf'

3

This sorting function can be used for all object sorting:

  • object
  • deepObject
  • numeric array

You can also do ascending or descending sort by passing 1, -1 as the parameter.

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'deepVal', {
    enumerable: false,
    writable: true,
    value: function (propertyChain) {
        var levels = propertyChain.split('.');
        parent = this;
        for (var i = 0; i < levels.length; i++) {
            if (!parent[levels[i]])
                return undefined;
            parent = parent[levels[i]];
        }
        return parent;
    }
});

function dynamicSortAll(property, sortOrders=1) {

    /** The default sorting will be ascending order. If
        you need descending order sorting you have to
        pass -1 as the parameter **/

    var sortOrder = sortOrders;

    return function (a, b) {

        var result = (property? ((a.deepVal(property) > b.deepVal(property)) ? 1 : (a.deepVal(property) < b.deepVal(property)) ? -1 : 0) : ((a > b) ? 1 : (a < b) ? -1 : 0))

        return result * sortOrder;
    }
}

deepObj = [
    {
        a: { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 },
        b: { a: 4, b: 5, c: 6 }
    },
    {
        a: { a: 3, b: 2, c: 1 },
        b: { a: 6, b: 5, c: 4 }
}];

let deepobjResult = deepObj.sort(dynamicSortAll('a.a', 1))
console.log('deepobjResult: ' + JSON.stringify(deepobjResult))
var obj = [
    { first_nom: 'Lazslo', last_nom: 'Jamf'     },
    { first_nom: 'Pig',    last_nom: 'Bodine'   },
    { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Prentice' }
];
let objResult = obj.sort(dynamicSortAll('last_nom', 1))
console.log('objResult: ' + JSON.stringify(objResult))

var numericObj = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

let numResult = numericObj.sort(dynamicSortAll(null, -1))
console.log('numResult: ' + JSON.stringify(numResult))

let stringSortResult = 'helloworld'.split('').sort(dynamicSortAll(null, 1))

console.log('stringSortResult: ' + JSON.stringify(stringSortResult))

let uniqueStringOrger=[...new Set(stringSortResult)];
console.log('uniqueStringOrger: ' + JSON.stringify(uniqueStringOrger))

3

I just enhanced Ege Özcan's dynamic sort to dive deep inside objects.

If the data looks like this:

obj = [
    {
        a: { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 },
        b: { a: 4, b: 5, c: 6 }
    },
    {
        a: { a: 3, b: 2, c: 1 },
        b: { a: 6, b: 5, c: 4 }
}];

And if you want to sort it over a a.a property, I think my enhancement helps very well. I add new functionality to objects like this:

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'deepVal', {
    enumerable: false,
    writable: true,
    value: function (propertyChain) {
        var levels = propertyChain.split('.');
        parent = this;
        for (var i = 0; i < levels.length; i++) {
            if (!parent[levels[i]])
                return undefined;
            parent = parent[levels[i]];
        }
        return parent;
    }
});

And changed _dynamicSort's return function:

return function (a, b) {
    var result = ((a.deepVal(property) > b.deepVal(property)) - (a.deepVal(property) < b.deepVal(property)));
    return result * sortOrder;
}

And now you can sort by a.a. this way:

obj.sortBy('a.a');

See the complete script in a JSFiddle.

3
  var objs = [ 
    { firstName: 'A', lastName: 'Mark'  }, // b
    { firstName: 'E', lastName: 'askavy' }, // a
    { firstName: 'C', lastName: 'peter' }
];

objs.sort((a,b) => {
   return a.firstName.localeCompare(b.firstName) // Sort Ascending 
}) 

objs.sort((a,b) => {
   return b.firstName.localeCompare(a.firstName) // Sort Decending
}) 

 console.log(objs)
2

I would do it like this:

[...objs].sort((a, b) => a.last_nom.localeCompare(b.last_nom))
2

For fp-holics:

const objectSorter = (p) => (a, b) => ((a, b) => a>b ? 1 : a<b ? -1 : 0)(a[p], b[p]);
objs.sort(objectSorter('first_nom'));
2

Here’s a function you can use to sort the list by multiple objects, where if the first object is equal, the second order will be used as a fallback. Empty values should also be ignored to fallback order, if possible.

function sortObjects(list, orderBy){
    list.sort(function(a, b){
        let byIndex = 0;
        let order = orderBy[byIndex];
        while(!a[order.by] || !b[order.by] || a[order.by] === b[order.by]){
            byIndex++;
            if(byIndex >= orderBy.length){break;}
            order = orderBy[byIndex];
        }
        if(!a[order.by] || !b[order.by] || a[order.by] === b[order.by]){
            return false;
        }
        if(order.desc){
            return a[order.by] < b[order.by];
        }
        return a[order.by] > b[order.by];
    });
    return list;
}

Usage:

var objs = [
    {a: 10, b: 20, c: 30},
    {a: 30, b: 10, c: 20},
    {a: 20, b: 10, c: 30},
];

sortObjectList(objs, [{by: 'a'}]);
[
    {a: 10, b: 20, c: 30},
    {a: 20, b: 10, c: 30},
    {a: 30, b: 10, c: 20},
]

sortObjectList(objs, [{by: 'a', desc: true}]);
[
    {a: 30, b: 10, c: 20},
    {a: 20, b: 10, c: 30},
    {a: 10, b: 20, c: 30},
]

sortObjectList(objs, [{by: 'b', desc: true}, {by: 'c'}]);
[
    {a: 10, b: 20, c: 30},
    {a: 30, b: 10, c: 20},
    {a: 20, b: 10, c: 30},
]

Another example:

var objs = [
    {a: 5, b: 5},
    {a: 10, b: 15},
    {a: 15, b: 25},
    {b: 10},
    {b: 20},
    {a: 10, b: 30},
    {a: 10, b: 12},
];

sortObjectList(objs, [{by: 'a'}, {by: 'b'}]);
[
    {a: 5, b: 5},
    {b: 10},
    {a: 10, b: 12},
    {a: 10, b: 15},
    {b: 20},
    {a: 10, b: 30},
    {a: 15, b: 25},
]
2

So here is one sorting algorithm which can sort in any order, throughout array of any kind of objects, without the restriction of datatype comparison (i.e., Number, String, etc.):

function smoothSort(items,prop,reverse) {
    var length = items.length;
    for (var i = (length - 1); i >= 0; i--) {
        //Number of passes
        for (var j = (length - i); j > 0; j--) {
            //Compare the adjacent positions
            if(reverse){
              if (items[j][prop] > items[j - 1][prop]) {
                //Swap the numbers
                var tmp = items[j];
                items[j] = items[j - 1];
                items[j - 1] = tmp;
            }
            }

            if(!reverse){
              if (items[j][prop] < items[j - 1][prop]) {
                  //Swap the numbers
                  var tmp = items[j];
                  items[j] = items[j - 1];
                  items[j - 1] = tmp;
              }
            }
        }
    }

    return items;
}
  • the first argument items is the array of objects,

  • prop is the key of the object on which you want to sort,

  • reverse is a Boolean parameter which on being true results in ascending order and in false it returns descending order.

2

This will sort a two-level nested array by the property passed to it in alphanumeric order.

function sortArrayObjectsByPropAlphaNum(property) {
    return function (a,b) {
        var reA = /[^a-zA-Z]/g;
        var reN = /[^0-9]/g;
        var aA = a[property].replace(reA, '');
        var bA = b[property].replace(reA, '');

        if(aA === bA) {
            var aN = parseInt(a[property].replace(reN, ''), 10);
            var bN = parseInt(b[property].replace(reN, ''), 10);
            return aN === bN ? 0 : aN > bN ? 1 : -1;
        } else {
            return a[property] > b[property] ? 1 : -1;
        }
    };
}

Usage:

objs.sort(utils.sortArrayObjectsByPropAlphaNum('last_nom'));
2

I came into the problem of sorting array of objects, with changing the priority of values. Basically I want to sort an array of peoples by their age, and then by surname - or just by surname, name.

I think that this is simplest solution compared to other answers.

It’s is used by calling sortPeoples(['array', 'of', 'properties'], reverse=false).

/////////////////////// Example array of peoples ///////////////////////

var peoples = [
    {name: "Zach", surname: "Emergency", age: 1},
    {name: "Nancy", surname: "Nurse", age: 1},
    {name: "Ethel", surname: "Emergency", age: 1},
    {name: "Nina", surname: "Nurse", age: 42},
    {name: "Anthony", surname: "Emergency", age: 42},
    {name: "Nina", surname: "Nurse", age: 32},
    {name: "Ed", surname: "Emergency", age: 28},
    {name: "Peter", surname: "Physician", age: 58},
    {name: "Al", surname: "Emergency", age: 58},
    {name: "Ruth", surname: "Registration", age: 62},
    {name: "Ed", surname: "Emergency", age: 38},
    {name: "Tammy", surname: "Triage", age: 29},
    {name: "Alan", surname: "Emergency", age: 60},
    {name: "Nina", surname: "Nurse", age: 58}
];


//////////////////////// Sorting function /////////////////////
function sortPeoples(propertyArr, reverse) {
    function compare(a, b) {
        var i = 0;
        while (propertyArr[i]) {
            if (a[propertyArr[i]] < b[propertyArr[i]])
                return -1;
            if (a[propertyArr[i]] > b[propertyArr[i]])
                return 1;
            i++;
        }
        return 0;
    }
    peoples.sort(compare);

    if (reverse) {
        peoples.reverse();
    }
};

//////////////// End of sorting method ///////////////
function printPeoples() {
    $('#output').html('');
    peoples.forEach(function(person) {
        $('#output').append(person.surname + " " + person.name + " " + person.age + "<br>");
    })
}
<head>
    <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
</head>

<html>

    <body>

        <button onclick="sortPeoples(['surname']); printPeoples()">sort by ONLY by surname ASC results in mess with same name cases</button><br>
        <button onclick="sortPeoples(['surname', 'name'], true); printPeoples()">sort by surname then name DESC</button><br>
        <button onclick="sortPeoples(['age']); printPeoples()">sort by AGE ASC. Same issue as in first case</button><br>
        <button onclick="sortPeoples(['age', 'surname']); printPeoples()">sort by AGE and Surname ASC. Adding second field fixed it.</button><br>

        <div id="output"></div>
    </body>

</html>

2
  • 3
    array of peoples :(
    – Penguin9
    Commented Feb 14, 2017 at 14:17
  • The HTML is bogus. The head element is outside of the html element. Is the rest of the answer bogus? Commented Dec 10, 2022 at 21:49
1

In case you have nested objects

const objs = [{
        first_nom: 'Lazslo',
        last_nom: 'Jamf',
        moreDetails: {
            age: 20
        }
    }, {
        first_nom: 'Pig',
        last_nom: 'Bodine',
        moreDetails: {
            age: 21
        }
    }, {
        first_nom: 'Pirate',
        last_nom: 'Prentice',
        moreDetails: {
            age: 22
        }
    }];

nestedSort = (prop1, prop2 = null, direction = 'asc') => (e1, e2) => {
        const a = prop2 ? e1[prop1][prop2] : e1[prop1],
            b = prop2 ? e2[prop1][prop2] : e2[prop1],
            sortOrder = direction === "asc" ? 1 : -1
        return (a < b) ? -sortOrder : (a > b) ? sortOrder : 0;
    }

and call it like

objs.sort(nestedSort("last_nom"));
objs.sort(nestedSort("last_nom", null, "desc"));
objs.sort(nestedSort("moreDetails", "age"));
objs.sort(nestedSort("moreDetails", "age", "desc"));
1

I will give you a solution implementing a selection sort algorithm. It is simple and effective.

var objs = [
  { first_nom: 'Lazslo', last_nom: 'Jamf'     },
  { first_nom: 'Pig',    last_nom: 'Bodine'   },
  { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Prentice' }
];


function selection_Sort(num) {
  //console.log(num);
  var temp, index;
  for (var i = 0; i <= num.length - 1; i++) {
    index = i;

    for (var j = i + 1; j <= num.length - 1; j++) {
      // You can use first_nom/last_nom, any way you choose to sort

      if (num[j].last_nom < num[index].last_nom) {
        index = j;
      }
    }

    // Below is the swapping part
    temp = num[i].last_nom;
    num[i].last_nom = num[index].last_nom;
    num[index].last_nom = temp;
  };
  console.log(num);
  return num;
}

selection_Sort(objs);
1

Try this way:

let objs = [
        { first_nom: 'Lazslo', last_nom: 'Jamf'     },
        { first_nom: 'Pig',    last_nom: 'Bodine'   },
        { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Prentice' }
    ];

const compareBylastNom = (a, b) => {
    // Converting to uppercase to have case-insensitive comparison
    const name1 = a.last_nom.toUpperCase();
    const name2 = b.last_nom.toUpperCase();

    let comparison = 0;

    if (name1 > name2) {
        comparison = 1;
    } else if (name1 < name2) {
        comparison = -1;
    }
    return comparison;
}

console.log(objs.sort(compareBylastNom));
0
1

I do like below.

var objs = [ 
    { first_nom: 'Lazslo', last_nom: 'Jamf'     },
    { first_nom: 'Pig',    last_nom: 'Bodine'   },
    { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Prentice' }
];

objs.sort(function(a, b) {
  const nameA = a.name.toUpperCase(); // ignore upper and lowercase
  const nameB = b.name.toUpperCase(); // ignore upper and lowercase
  if (nameA < nameB) {
    return -1;
  }
  if (nameA > nameB) {
    return 1;
  }
  // names must be equal
  return 0;
});

console.log(arr);
1
  • The use of a sort function with toUpperCase is covered here. Does this slight variation offer any significant advantage? Commented Feb 12 at 14:33
1

You can also add a generic function for sorting strings and numbers in ascending or descending order for example:

function sortArray({ data, key, sortingOrder }) {
    return data.sort((a, b) => {
      const firstValue = typeof a[key] === 'string' ? a[key]?.toLowerCase() : a[key];
      const secondValue = typeof b[key] === 'string' ? b[key]?.toLowerCase() : b[key];

      if (firstValue < secondValue) {
        return sortingOrder === SORT_ORDER.ASC ? -1 : 1;
      }
      if (firstValue > secondValue) {
        return sortingOrder === SORT_ORDER.ASC ? 1 : -1;
      }
      return 0;
    });
  }



const SORT_ORDER={
DES: 'Z-A',
ASC: 'A-Z'
};

var objs = [ 
    { first_nom: 'Lazslo', last_nom: 'Zwalle'     },
    { first_nom: 'Pig',    last_nom: 'Podine'   },
    { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Antun' }
];

const sortedArray = sortArray({
data: objs,
key: 'last_nom',
sortingOrder: SORT_ORDER.ASC
});

console.log('sorted array', sortedArray);

1
function compareProperty({ key, direction }) {
    return function (a, b) {
        const ap = a[key] || ''
        const bp = b[key] || ''

        return (direction === "desc" ? -1 : 1) * ((typeof ap === "string" && typeof bp === "string") ? ap.localeCompare(bp) : ap - bp)
    }
}

works with null, undefined keys. numeric, date, string, characters with diacritics are sorted as you expect.

use:

const sort = {
    key: "name",
    direction: "asc"
}

results.toSorted(compareProperty(sort))
0

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.