438

Project that I am working on (node.js) implies lots of operations with the file system (copying/reading/writing etc). I'd like to know which methods are the fastest, and I'd be happy to get an advice. Thanks.

  • 41
    It's a good question, though it is interesting that it gets 25 upvotes when other similar format questions will get 3 or 4 downvotes right away for not meeting the SO "standards" (maybe the javascript tag is crawled by kinder people :) – Ben Sep 11 '13 at 11:47
  • 21
    Mostly we're just fresh new and excited about this whole "files" business after years of normalizing browsers. – Erik Reppen Oct 30 '14 at 17:32
  • 2
    The only correct answer on the page is this one. None of the other answers actually copy files. Files on MacOS and Windows have other metadata that is lost by just copying bytes. Examples of data not copied by any other answer on this page, windows and macos. Even on Unix the other answers don't copy the creation date, something that's often important when copying a file. – gman Oct 23 '18 at 3:58

15 Answers 15

647

This is a good way to copy a file in one line of code using streams:

var fs = require('fs');

fs.createReadStream('test.log').pipe(fs.createWriteStream('newLog.log'));

In node v8.5.0, copyFile was added

const fs = require('fs');

// destination.txt will be created or overwritten by default.
fs.copyFile('source.txt', 'destination.txt', (err) => {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log('source.txt was copied to destination.txt');
});
  • 61
    Just remember that in real life, you'd want to check both the createReadStream and createWriteStream for errors, so you wouldn't get a one-liner (though it would still be just as fast). – ebohlman Jul 4 '12 at 0:37
  • 15
    How much faster/slower is this than executing the raw cp test.log newLog.log via require('child_process').exec? – Lance Pollard Jan 30 '13 at 20:03
  • 40
    Well copy is not portable on Window, contrary to a full Node.js solution. – Jean Jul 3 '13 at 18:51
  • 11
    Unfortunately on my system using streams is extremely slow compared to child_process.execFile('/bin/cp', ['--no-target-directory', source, target]). – Robert Sep 25 '13 at 22:27
  • 12
    I used this method and all I got was a blank file on write. any ideas why? fs.createReadStream('./init/xxx.json').pipe(fs.createWriteStream('xxx.json')); – Timmerz Aug 20 '14 at 15:23
288

Same mechanism, but this adds error handling:

function copyFile(source, target, cb) {
  var cbCalled = false;

  var rd = fs.createReadStream(source);
  rd.on("error", function(err) {
    done(err);
  });
  var wr = fs.createWriteStream(target);
  wr.on("error", function(err) {
    done(err);
  });
  wr.on("close", function(ex) {
    done();
  });
  rd.pipe(wr);

  function done(err) {
    if (!cbCalled) {
      cb(err);
      cbCalled = true;
    }
  }
}
  • 5
    It is worth noting that cbCalled flag is needed because pipe errors trigger an error on both streams. Source and destination streams. – Gaston Sanchez Mar 26 '14 at 21:33
  • 3
    How do you handle the error if the source file doesn't exist? Destination file still gets created in that case. – Michel Hua May 18 '14 at 18:04
  • 1
    I think an error in the WriteStream will only unpipe it. You would have to call rd.destroy() yourself. At least that's what happened to me. Sadly there's not much documentation except from the source code. – Robert Aug 6 '14 at 5:46
  • Wish someone could clarify @Robert point. – pilau Feb 14 '15 at 5:26
  • 4
    @SaiyanGirl 'cb' stands for "callback". You should pass in a function. – Brian J. Miller Feb 26 '15 at 22:08
136

I was not able to get the createReadStream/createWriteStream method working for some reason, but using fs-extra npm module it worked right away. I am not sure of the performance difference though.

fs-extra

npm install --save fs-extra

var fs = require('fs-extra');

fs.copySync(path.resolve(__dirname,'./init/xxx.json'), 'xxx.json');
  • 3
    This is the best option now – Zain Rizvi Jan 5 '15 at 22:23
  • 11
    Using syncronous code in node kills your application performance. – mvillar May 21 '15 at 6:44
  • 91
    Fortunately performance is not always an issue. – ciscoheat May 26 '15 at 19:12
  • 22
    Fastest to implement or fastest to execute? Differing priorities mean this is a valid answer. – Patrick Gunderson Sep 23 '15 at 20:35
  • 14
    fs-extra also has asynchronous methods, i.e. fs.copy(src, dst, callback);, and these should resolve @mvillar's concern. – Marc Durdin Nov 9 '15 at 10:49
119

Since Node.js 8.5.0 we have new fs.copyFile and fs.copyFileSync methods.

Usage Example:

var fs = require('fs');

// destination.txt will be created or overwritten by default.
fs.copyFile('source.txt', 'destination.txt', (err) => {
    if (err) throw err;
    console.log('source.txt was copied to destination.txt');
});
  • 8
    This should be the correct answer – Melle Jul 20 '18 at 9:44
  • 2
    This is the only correct answer on the page. None of the other answers actually copy files. Files on MacOS and Windows have other metadata that is lost by just copying bytes. Examples of data not copied by any other answer on this page, windows and macos. Even on Unix the other answer don't copy the creation date, something that's often important when copying a file. – gman Oct 23 '18 at 3:56
  • Indeed a file is often more than its sole content... – Samuel Nov 13 '18 at 8:27
73

Fast to write and convenient to use, with promise and error management.

function copyFile(source, target) {
  var rd = fs.createReadStream(source);
  var wr = fs.createWriteStream(target);
  return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
    rd.on('error', reject);
    wr.on('error', reject);
    wr.on('finish', resolve);
    rd.pipe(wr);
  }).catch(function(error) {
    rd.destroy();
    wr.end();
    throw error;
  });
}

Same with async/await syntax:

async function copyFile(source, target) {
  var rd = fs.createReadStream(source);
  var wr = fs.createWriteStream(target);
  try {
    return await new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
      rd.on('error', reject);
      wr.on('error', reject);
      wr.on('finish', resolve);
      rd.pipe(wr);
    });
  } catch (error) {
    rd.destroy();
    wr.end();
    throw error;
  }
}
  • 1
    What happens when no more input exists (broken network share), but the write still succeeds? Will both reject (from read) and resolve (from write) be called? What if both read/write fails (bad disk sectors during read, full disk during write)? Then reject will be called twice. A Promise solution based on Mike's answer with a flag (unfortunately) seems to be the only viable solution that properly considers error handling. – Lekensteyn May 24 '15 at 13:15
  • The promise is resolved once the copy succeed. If it's rejected, its state is settled and calling reject multiple times won't make no difference. – benweet May 24 '15 at 17:08
  • 2
    I just tested new Promise(function(resolve, reject) { resolve(1); resolve(2); reject(3); reject(4); console.log("DONE"); }).then(console.log.bind(console), function(e){console.log("E", e);}); and looked up the spec on this and you are right: Attempting to resolve or reject a resolved promise has no effect. Perhaps you could extend your answer and explain why you have written the function in this way? Thanks :-) – Lekensteyn May 24 '15 at 22:42
  • 2
    By the way, close should be finish for Writable streams. – Lekensteyn May 25 '15 at 9:32
  • And if you wonder why your application never closes after pipe errors on /dev/stdin, that is a bug github.com/joyent/node/issues/25375 – Lekensteyn May 27 '15 at 9:26
42

Well, usually it is good to avoid asynchronous file operations. Here is the short (i.e. no error handling) sync example:

var fs = require('fs');
fs.writeFileSync(targetFile, fs.readFileSync(sourceFile));
  • 96
    Why is it good to avoid asynchronous file operations? – tgies May 8 '14 at 19:09
  • 7
    To say that in general is extremely false, particularly since it leads to people re-slurping files for every request made to their server. This can get expensive. – Catalyst Jun 19 '14 at 16:14
  • 7
    using the *Sync methods are totally against nodejs' philosphy! I also think they are slowly being deprecated. The whole idea of nodejs is that it's single threaded and event-driven. – gillyb Oct 14 '14 at 21:15
  • 11
    @gillyb The only reason I can think of for using them is for simplicity - if you are writing a quick script that you will only use once, you probably aren't going to be all that bothered about blocking the process. – starbeamrainbowlabs Oct 24 '14 at 7:23
  • 12
    I'm not aware of them being deprecated. Sync methods are almost always a terrible idea on a web server but sometimes ideal in something like node-webkit where it only locks up action in the window while files are copying. Throw up a loading gif and maybe a load bar that updates at certain points and let sync methods block all action until the copying is done. It's not really a best practice thing so much as a when and where they have their place thing. – Erik Reppen Oct 30 '14 at 17:42
18

Mike Schilling's solution with error handling with a short-cut for the error event handler.

function copyFile(source, target, cb) {
  var cbCalled = false;

  var rd = fs.createReadStream(source);
  rd.on("error", done);

  var wr = fs.createWriteStream(target);
  wr.on("error", done);
  wr.on("close", function(ex) {
    done();
  });
  rd.pipe(wr);

  function done(err) {
    if (!cbCalled) {
      cb(err);
      cbCalled = true;
    }
  }
}
18

If you don't care about it being async, and aren't copying gigabyte-sized files, and would rather not add another dependency just for a single function:

function copySync(src, dest) {
  if (!fs.existsSync(src)) {
    return false;
  }

  var data = fs.readFileSync(src, 'utf-8');
  fs.writeFileSync(dest, data);
}
  • 4
    I like this answer. Clear and simple. – Rob Gleeson May 12 '17 at 18:44
  • 6
    @RobGleeson, and requires as much memory as the file content... I am amazed by the count of upvotes there. – Konstantin Jun 19 '17 at 18:25
  • I've added a "and aren't copying gigabyte-sized files" caveat. – Andrew Childs Nov 22 '17 at 17:16
  • The fs.existsSync call should be omitted. The file could disappear in the time between the fs.existsSync call and the fs.readFileSync call, which means the fs.existsSync call doesn't protect us from anything. – qntm Aug 8 at 13:53
1

benweet's solution checking visibility of the file before copy:

function copy(from, to) {
    return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
        fs.access(from, fs.F_OK, function (error) {
            if (error) {
                reject(error);
            } else {
                var inputStream = fs.createReadStream(from);
                var outputStream = fs.createWriteStream(to);

                function rejectCleanup(error) {
                    inputStream.destroy();
                    outputStream.end();
                    reject(error);
                }

                inputStream.on('error', rejectCleanup);
                outputStream.on('error', rejectCleanup);

                outputStream.on('finish', resolve);

                inputStream.pipe(outputStream);
            }
        });
    });
}
0

Mike's solution, but with promises:

const FileSystem = require('fs');

exports.copyFile = function copyFile(source, target) {
    return new Promise((resolve,reject) => {
        const rd = FileSystem.createReadStream(source);
        rd.on('error', err => reject(err));
        const wr = FileSystem.createWriteStream(target);
        wr.on('error', err => reject(err));
        wr.on('close', () => resolve());
        rd.pipe(wr);
    });
};
0

Improvement of one other answer.

Features:

  • If the dst folders do not exist, it will automatically create it. The other answer will only throw errors.
  • It returns a promise, which makes it easier to use in a larger project.
  • It allows you to copy multiple files, and the promise will be done when all of them are copied.

Usage:

var onePromise = copyFilePromise("src.txt", "dst.txt");
var anotherPromise = copyMultiFilePromise(new Array(new Array("src1.txt", "dst1.txt"), new Array("src2.txt", "dst2.txt")));

Code:

function copyFile(source, target, cb) {
    console.log("CopyFile", source, target);

    var ensureDirectoryExistence = function (filePath) {
        var dirname = path.dirname(filePath);
        if (fs.existsSync(dirname)) {
            return true;
        }
        ensureDirectoryExistence(dirname);
        fs.mkdirSync(dirname);
    }
    ensureDirectoryExistence(target);

    var cbCalled = false;
    var rd = fs.createReadStream(source);
    rd.on("error", function (err) {
        done(err);
    });
    var wr = fs.createWriteStream(target);
    wr.on("error", function (err) {
        done(err);
    });
    wr.on("close", function (ex) {
        done();
    });
    rd.pipe(wr);
    function done(err) {
        if (!cbCalled) {
            cb(err);
            cbCalled = true;
        }
    }
}

function copyFilePromise(source, target) {
    return new Promise(function (accept, reject) {
        copyFile(source, target, function (data) {
            if (data === undefined) {
                accept();
            } else {
                reject(data);
            }
        });
    });
}

function copyMultiFilePromise(srcTgtPairArr) {
    var copyFilePromiseArr = new Array();
    srcTgtPairArr.forEach(function (srcTgtPair) {
        copyFilePromiseArr.push(copyFilePromise(srcTgtPair[0], srcTgtPair[1]));
    });
    return Promise.all(copyFilePromiseArr);
}
0

Why not use nodejs built in copy function?

It provide both async and sync version:

const fs = require('fs');

// destination.txt will be created or overwritten by default.
fs.copyFile('source.txt', 'destination.txt', (err) => {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log('source.txt was copied to destination.txt');
});

https://nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_copyfilesync_src_dest_flags

  • 2
    Not upvoting because this answer is a duplicate. – Qwertie Jul 3 '18 at 0:23
0

For fast copies you should use the fs.constants.COPYFILE_FICLONE flag. It allows (for filesystems that support this) to not actually copy the content of the file. Just a new file entry is created, but it points to a Copy-on-Write "clone" of the source file.

To do nothing/less is the fastest way of doing something ;)

https://nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_copyfile_src_dest_flags_callback

let fs = require("fs");

fs.copyFile(
  "source.txt",
  "destination.txt",
  fs.constants.COPYFILE_FICLONE,
  (err) => {
    if (err) {
      // TODO: handle error
      console.log("error");
    }
    console.log("success");
  }
);

Using promises instead:

let fs = require("fs");
let util = require("util");
let copyFile = util.promisify(fs.copyFile);


copyFile(
  "source.txt",
  "destination.txt",
  fs.constants.COPYFILE_FICLONE
)
  .catch(() => console.log("error"))
  .then(() => console.log("success"));
-1

all above solutions that do not check an existence of a source file are dangerous... e.g.

fs.stat(source, function(err,stat) { if (err) { reject(err) }

otherwise there is a risk in a scenario in case source and target are by a mistake replaced, your data will be permanently lost without noticing any error.

  • This also has a race condition: the file could be destroyed between stat-ing it and reading/writing/copying. It's always better to just try the operation and deal with any resulting error. – Jared Smith Aug 10 at 13:28
  • checking existence of target before a write operation ensures you do not overwrite the target by accident e.g. covers a scenario that destination and source are set by user by mistake the same... it is then late to wait the write operation to fail... whosever gave me (-1) please review your ranking once this incident happens in your project :-) re. races - on heavy trafic sites is always recommended to have one process handling operations requiring sync assurance - yes it is then performance bottleneck – stancikcom Aug 12 at 9:26
  • I didn't downvote because you're wrong, I downvoted because this isn't an answer to the question. It should be a cautionary comment on an existing answer. – Jared Smith Aug 12 at 14:43
  • well - you a right e.g. andrew childs solution (with 18 upvotes) will run out on resources on a server / large files... i would write comments to him but I dont have reputation to comment - therefore you have seen my post standalone.... but Jared your downgrade means a simple takeway for me - keep silent and let people write and share dangerous code that mostly "works" ... – stancikcom Aug 13 at 16:55
  • I get it, no one likes negative feedback. But it's just a downvote. I stand by my reason for giving it, as this does not answer the question the OP asked and is short enough to be a comment. You can take it however you want, but if you blow that sort of thing out of proportion you are going to find stack overflow to be a very frustrating experience. – Jared Smith Aug 13 at 18:01
-1
   const fs = require("fs");
   fs.copyFileSync("filepath1", "filepath2"); //fs.copyFileSync("file1.txt", "file2.txt");

This is what I personally use to copy a file and replace another file using node.js :)

  • 1
    This does not answer the question, which is about how to efficiently copy files in an IO-heavy application. – Jared Smith Aug 10 at 13:26

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