27

I have an array:

array(
    0 => 'contact',
    1 => 'home',
    2 => 'projects'
);

and I need to swap the 'contact' with 'home', so the array would be like:

array(
    0 => 'home',
    1 => 'contact',
    2 => 'projects'
);

how can I do this with PHP? :)

| improve this question | | | | |
  • 1
    Can't you just use a temp variable to make the swap? – j08691 Jul 2 '12 at 17:22
  • 1
    If you need to sort the array, you need to define a clear sorting criteria. – jeroen Jul 2 '12 at 17:23
  • 4
    Maybe a better question: Why is it out of order in the first place? – Wesley Murch Jul 2 '12 at 17:23

11 Answers 11

42

Try this:

$a = array(
    0 => 'contact',
    1 => 'home',
    2 => 'projects'
);
$temp = $a[0];
$a[0] = $a[1];
$a[1] = $temp;
| improve this answer | | | | |
44

I wrote simple function array_swap: swap two elements between positions swap_a & swap_b.

function array_swap(&$array,$swap_a,$swap_b){
   list($array[$swap_a],$array[$swap_b]) = array($array[$swap_b],$array[$swap_a]);
}

For OP question (for example):

$items = array(
  0 => 'contact',
  1 => 'home',
  2 => 'projects'
);

array_swap($items,0,1);
var_dump($items);
// OUTPUT

array(3) {
   [0]=> string(4) "home"
   [1]=> string(7) "contact"
   [2]=> string(8) "projects"
 }

Update Since PHP 7.1 it's possible to do it like:

$items = [
  0 => 'contact',
  1 => 'home',
  2 => 'projects'
];

[$items[0], $items[1]] = [$items[1], $items[0]];

var_dump($items);
// OUTPUT

array(3) {
   [0]=> string(4) "home"
   [1]=> string(7) "contact"
   [2]=> string(8) "projects"
 }

It's possible through Symmetric array destructuring.

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • The 2nd method can also be done with list(): list($items[0], $items[1]) = [$items[1], $items[0]]; (supported in PHP versions prior to 7.1) – glen-84 Dec 17 '18 at 13:05
7

Just use a temp variable to hold one value as you swap the other. Then restore the first with the temp variable. For numbers there are other methods that don't require the use of temp variables but here it's the best (only?) way.

$a = array(
    0 => 'contact',
    1 => 'home',
    2 => 'projects'
);

print_r($a);
Array ( [0] => contact [1] => home [2] => projects )

$tmp = $a[0];
$a[0] = $a[1];
$a[1] = $tmp;

print_r($a);
Array ( [0] => home [1] => contact [2] => projects )
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 2
    Why PriestVallon's answers has more voteups and is accepted one? Yours come five minutes before his and is actually exactly the same (which makes me fear, that he duped your answer)? – trejder May 15 '14 at 13:51
5

In PHP 7.1+ syntax, you can use this

[$Array[$a], $Array[$b]] = [$Array[$b], $Array[$a]];
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • This did not work and returned syntax error, unexpected '=' What would this fall under in PHP 7? – Jordan Nov 4 '17 at 3:26
  • (don't forget the semicolon) 7.1, not just version 7 or any sub versions @Jordan – Brian Leishman Nov 4 '17 at 19:38
  • @Jordan php.net/manual/en/… – Brian Leishman Nov 4 '17 at 19:40
  • It wasn't me. 😀 – Jordan Mar 19 '18 at 5:17
3

New answer: (as others have expressed)

I was not aware of Symmetric Array Destructuring at the time of posting, but that is a functionless, one-liner swapping technique -- I'd use that all day long.

A relevant blog post/tutorial. An example implemention for bubble sorting.

Code: (Demo)

$a = ['contact', 'home', 'projects'];

[$a[0], $a[1]] = [$a[1], $a[0]];

var_export($a);

Old answer:

If you want to avoid using temporary data storage, or love a one-liner use array_replace().

array_replace() will make adjustments in accordance with the indices:

Code: (Demo)

$a = array(
    0 => 'contact',
    1 => 'home',
    2 => 'projects'
);

var_export(array_replace($a,[$a[1],$a[0]]));

Output:

array (
  0 => 'home',
  1 => 'contact',
  2 => 'projects',
)
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • Beside the performance, this only works in the very special case swapping elements with keys 0 and 1. It may be a tempting one-liner for users who want a new array instead of an inplace swap though. In this case, a more explicit form such as array_replace($a, [I => $a[J], J => $a[I]]) would be more readable and less error-prone in my opinion. – luciole75w Feb 6 at 19:21
  • Thanks for bringing this to my attention. This answer was not reflecting my current advice, so I have edited. Cheers. – mickmackusa Feb 6 at 21:02
2
$array = array(
    0 => 'home',
    1 => 'contact',
    2 => 'projects'
);

$t = $array[0];
$array[0] = $array[1];
$array[1] = $t;

would be a simple enough approach…

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2

Just use a temp variable to hold it. So:

$temp = $array[0];
$array[0] = $array[1];
$array[1] = $temp;

That way you don't lose the value of one of them.

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1
$x = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');
array_splice($x, 1, 2, array_reverse(array_slice($x, 1, 2)));
var_dump($x);

array_splice can replace a reversed array_slice

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0

Solution:

$a = array(
    0 => 'contact',
    1 => 'home',
    2 => 'projects'
);

list($a[0], $a[1]) = [$a[1], $a[0]];

I have made function for it

function swap(&$a, &$b){
    list($a, $b) = [$b, $a];
}

Usage:

swap($a[0], $a[1]);

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0

I tested the 4 ways proposed to compare the performance:

$array=range(0,9999); //First 10000 natural numbers
$time=-microtime(true); //Start time
for($i=0;$i<1000000;++$i){ //1 Millon swaps
    $a=array_rand($array); //Random position: ~60ms
    $b=array_rand($array); //Random position: ~60ms
    //Using a temp variable: ~70ms
    $temp=$array[0];$array[0]=$array[1];$array[1]=$temp;
    //Using list language construct: ~ 140ms
    list($array[$a],$array[$b])=array($array[$b],$array[$a]);
    //Using PHP 7.1+ syntax: ~ 140ms
    [$array[$a],$array[$b]]=[$array[$b],$array[$a]];
    //Using array_replace function: ~ 28000ms
    array_replace($array,[$array[$a],$array[$b]]);
}
$time+=microtime(true); //Elapsed time
echo "Time: ",sprintf('%f', $time)," seconds";

Although it is probably not the most comfortable way, using a temporary variable seems to be 2x faster than the next 2 methods, and 400x faster than using the array_replace function.

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-2

If you don't want to use another variable:

    $array[0] = $array[0] + $array[1];
    $array[1] = $array[0] - $array[1];
    $array[0] = $array[0] - $array[1];
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 1
    This will work if the array holds numerical values; however, the question is asking to swap two variable length strings. – Joel Jul 25 '13 at 13:27

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