I'd like to write some tests that check the XML Spring configuration of a deployed WAR. Unfortunately some beans require that some environment variables or system properties are set. How can I set an environment variable before the spring beans are initialized when using the convenient test style with @ContextConfiguration?

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations = "classpath:whereever/context.xml")
public class TestWarSpringContext { ... }

If I configure the application context with annotations, I don't see a hook where I can do something before the spring context is initialized.

up vote 87 down vote accepted

You can initialize the System property in a static initializer:

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations = "classpath:whereever/context.xml")
public class TestWarSpringContext {

    static {
        System.setProperty("myproperty", "foo");
    }

}

The static initializer code will be executed before the spring application context is initialized.

  • 10
    Silly me - OK, that would work. Even better: probably a @BeforeClass method to set the system property and an @AfterClass method to remove it would also work, and nicely clean up after itself. (Didn't try it out, though.) – Hans-Peter Störr Aug 27 '12 at 15:39
  • 1
    Tried the @BeforeClass - and it worked fine for setting system properties before other properties were set in the test instance – wbdarby Apr 2 '14 at 14:08
  • Thanks for this. The static thing didnt work but a small method with @BeforeClass worked ! – Midhun Agnihotram Dec 30 '16 at 4:31

The right way to do this, starting with Spring 4.1, is to use a @TestPropertySource annotation.

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations = "classpath:whereever/context.xml")
@TestPropertySource(properties = {"myproperty = foo"})
public class TestWarSpringContext {
    ...    
}

See @TestPropertySource in the Spring docs and Javadocs.

  • 1
    This annotation also supports a properties file path. – MigDus May 5 '16 at 14:44
  • 2
    I could switch the Spring Cloud Config Client label during tests using @TestPropertySource(properties={"spring.cloud.config.label=feature/branch"}) – Marcello de Sales Sep 19 '16 at 2:32
  • 1
    Good answer, but sadly didn't work for me, using Spring 4.2.9, the property was always empty. Only the static block worked... Worked for application properties, but not for system properties. – Gregor Feb 6 at 14:56
  • First I saw and tried the static version (which worked), but this Annotation is even cleaner und much more preferable (for me, as it also works like a charm). – BAERUS May 8 at 7:17

One can also use a test ApplicationContextInitializer to initialize a system property:

public class TestApplicationContextInitializer implements ApplicationContextInitializer<ConfigurableApplicationContext>
{
    @Override
    public void initialize(ConfigurableApplicationContext applicationContext)
    {
        System.setProperty("myproperty", "value");
    }
}

and then configure it on the test class in addition to the Spring context config file locations:

@ContextConfiguration(initializers = TestApplicationContextInitializer.class, locations = "classpath:whereever/context.xml", ...)
@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
public class SomeTest
{
...
}

This way code duplication can be avoided if a certain system property should be set for all the unit tests.

You can set the System properties as VM arguments.

If your project is a maven project then you can execute following command while running the test class:

mvn test -Dapp.url="https://stackoverflow.com"

Test class:

public class AppTest  {
@Test
public void testUrl() {
    System.out.println(System.getProperty("app.url"));
    }
}

If you want to run individual test class or method in eclipse then :

1) Go to Run -> Run Configuration

2) On left side select your Test class under the Junit section.

3) do the following :

enter image description here

If you want your variables to be valid for all tests, you can have an application.properties file in your test resources directory (by default: src/test/resources) which will look something like this:

MYPROPERTY=foo

This will then be loaded and used unless you have definitions via @TestPropertySource or a similar method - the exact order in which properties are loaded can be found in the Spring documentation chapter 24. Externalized Configuration.

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