53

I have a table:

create table Transactions(Tid int,amt int)

With 5 rows:

insert into Transactions values(1, 100)
insert into Transactions values(2, -50)
insert into Transactions values(3, 100)
insert into Transactions values(4, -100)
insert into Transactions values(5, 200)

Desired output:

TID  amt  balance
--- ----- -------
1    100   100
2    -50    50
3    100   150
4   -100    50
5    200   250

Basically for first record balance will be same as amt, 2nd onwards balance would be addition of previous balance + current amt. I am looking for an optimal approach. I could think about using function or correlated subquery but not sure exactly how to do it.

  • 3
    If you post code, XML or data samples, PLEASE highlight those lines in the text editor and click on the "code samples" button ( { } ) on the editor toolbar to nicely format and syntax highlight it! – marc_s Jul 3 '12 at 12:28
  • 1
    What, other than the TID field, represents the ordering criteria for your transactions? Is the TID field the only ordering criteria? Bear in mind, the sort order of your records will impact the running balance you seek as the computed value. – XIVSolutions Jul 3 '12 at 12:31
  • possible duplicate of How do I calculate a running total in SQL without using a cursor? – Paddy Jul 3 '12 at 12:32
  • 4
    You're not currently fixing RBS' transactions are you? :) – Paddy Jul 3 '12 at 12:41
  • 1
    I disagree with the duplicate suggestion - not because it's not the same question, but because the accepted answer there uses the quirky update method (actually just points to a link that describes the quirky update method) which isn't supported or documented and isn't guaranteed to work (now or in the future). – Aaron Bertrand Jul 3 '12 at 15:22
153

For those not using SQL Server 2012 or above, a cursor is likely the most efficient supported and guaranteed method outside of CLR. There are other approaches such as the "quirky update" which can be marginally faster but not guaranteed to work in the future, and of course set-based approaches with hyperbolic performance profiles as the table gets larger, and recursive CTE methods that often require direct #tempdb I/O or result in spills that yield roughly the same impact.


INNER JOIN - do not do this:

The slow, set-based approach is of the form:

SELECT t1.TID, t1.amt, RunningTotal = SUM(t2.amt)
FROM dbo.Transactions AS t1
INNER JOIN dbo.Transactions AS t2
  ON t1.TID >= t2.TID
GROUP BY t1.TID, t1.amt
ORDER BY t1.TID;

The reason this is slow? As the table gets larger, each incremental row requires reading n-1 rows in the table. This is exponential and bound for failures, timeouts, or just angry users.


Correlated subquery - do not do this either:

The subquery form is similarly painful for similarly painful reasons.

SELECT TID, amt, RunningTotal = amt + COALESCE(
(
  SELECT SUM(amt)
    FROM dbo.Transactions AS i
    WHERE i.TID < o.TID), 0
)
FROM dbo.Transactions AS o
ORDER BY TID;

Quirky update - do this at your own risk:

The "quirky update" method is more efficient than the above, but the behavior is not documented, there are no guarantees about order, and the behavior might work today but could break in the future. I'm including this because it is a popular method and it is efficient, but that doesn't mean I endorse it. The primary reason I even answered this question instead of closing it as a duplicate is because the other question has a quirky update as the accepted answer.

DECLARE @t TABLE
(
  TID INT PRIMARY KEY,
  amt INT,
  RunningTotal INT
);

DECLARE @RunningTotal INT = 0;

INSERT @t(TID, amt, RunningTotal)
  SELECT TID, amt, RunningTotal = 0
  FROM dbo.Transactions
  ORDER BY TID;

UPDATE @t
  SET @RunningTotal = RunningTotal = @RunningTotal + amt
  FROM @t;

SELECT TID, amt, RunningTotal
  FROM @t
  ORDER BY TID;

Recursive CTEs

This first one relies on TID to be contiguous, no gaps:

;WITH x AS
(
  SELECT TID, amt, RunningTotal = amt
    FROM dbo.Transactions
    WHERE TID = 1
  UNION ALL
  SELECT y.TID, y.amt, x.RunningTotal + y.amt
   FROM x 
   INNER JOIN dbo.Transactions AS y
   ON y.TID = x.TID + 1
)
SELECT TID, amt, RunningTotal
  FROM x
  ORDER BY TID
  OPTION (MAXRECURSION 10000);

If you can't rely on this, then you can use this variation, which simply builds a contiguous sequence using ROW_NUMBER():

;WITH y AS 
(
  SELECT TID, amt, rn = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY TID)
    FROM dbo.Transactions
), x AS
(
    SELECT TID, rn, amt, rt = amt
      FROM y
      WHERE rn = 1
    UNION ALL
    SELECT y.TID, y.rn, y.amt, x.rt + y.amt
      FROM x INNER JOIN y
      ON y.rn = x.rn + 1
)
SELECT TID, amt, RunningTotal = rt
  FROM x
  ORDER BY x.rn
  OPTION (MAXRECURSION 10000);

Depending on the size of the data (e.g. columns we don't know about), you may find better overall performance by stuffing the relevant columns only in a #temp table first, and processing against that instead of the base table:

CREATE TABLE #x
(
  rn  INT PRIMARY KEY,
  TID INT,
  amt INT
);

INSERT INTO #x (rn, TID, amt)
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY TID),
  TID, amt
FROM dbo.Transactions;

;WITH x AS
(
  SELECT TID, rn, amt, rt = amt
    FROM #x
    WHERE rn = 1
  UNION ALL
  SELECT y.TID, y.rn, y.amt, x.rt + y.amt
    FROM x INNER JOIN #x AS y
    ON y.rn = x.rn + 1
)
SELECT TID, amt, RunningTotal = rt
  FROM x
  ORDER BY TID
  OPTION (MAXRECURSION 10000);

DROP TABLE #x;

Only the first CTE method will provide performance rivaling the quirky update, but it makes a big assumption about the nature of the data (no gaps). The other two methods will fall back and in those cases you may as well use a cursor (if you can't use CLR and you're not yet on SQL Server 2012 or above).


Cursor

Everybody is told that cursors are evil, and that they should be avoided at all costs, but this actually beats the performance of most other supported methods, and is safer than the quirky update. The only ones I prefer over the cursor solution are the 2012 and CLR methods (below):

CREATE TABLE #x
(
  TID INT PRIMARY KEY, 
  amt INT, 
  rt INT
);

INSERT #x(TID, amt) 
  SELECT TID, amt
  FROM dbo.Transactions
  ORDER BY TID;

DECLARE @rt INT, @tid INT, @amt INT;
SET @rt = 0;

DECLARE c CURSOR LOCAL STATIC READ_ONLY FORWARD_ONLY
  FOR SELECT TID, amt FROM #x ORDER BY TID;

OPEN c;

FETCH c INTO @tid, @amt;

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
  SET @rt = @rt + @amt;
  UPDATE #x SET rt = @rt WHERE TID = @tid;
  FETCH c INTO @tid, @amt;
END

CLOSE c; DEALLOCATE c;

SELECT TID, amt, RunningTotal = rt 
  FROM #x 
  ORDER BY TID;

DROP TABLE #x;

SQL Server 2012 or above

New window functions introduced in SQL Server 2012 make this task a lot easier (and it performs better than all of the above methods as well):

SELECT TID, amt, 
  RunningTotal = SUM(amt) OVER (ORDER BY TID ROWS UNBOUNDED PRECEDING)
FROM dbo.Transactions
ORDER BY TID;

Note that on larger data sets, you'll find that the above performs much better than either of the following two options, since RANGE uses an on-disk spool (and the default uses RANGE). However it is also important to note that the behavior and results can differ, so be sure they both return correct results before deciding between them based on this difference.

SELECT TID, amt, 
  RunningTotal = SUM(amt) OVER (ORDER BY TID)
FROM dbo.Transactions
ORDER BY TID;

SELECT TID, amt, 
  RunningTotal = SUM(amt) OVER (ORDER BY TID RANGE UNBOUNDED PRECEDING)
FROM dbo.Transactions
ORDER BY TID;

CLR

For completeness, I'm offering a link to Pavel Pawlowski's CLR method, which is by far the preferable method on versions prior to SQL Server 2012 (but not 2000 obviously).

http://www.pawlowski.cz/2010/09/sql-server-and-fastest-running-totals-using-clr/


Conclusion

If you are on SQL Server 2012 or above, the choice is obvious - use the new SUM() OVER() construct (with ROWS vs. RANGE). For earlier versions, you'll want to compare the performance of the alternative approaches on your schema, data and - taking non-performance-related factors in mind - determine which approach is right for you. It very well may be the CLR approach. Here are my recommendations, in order of preference:

  1. SUM() OVER() ... ROWS, if on 2012 or above
  2. CLR method, if possible
  3. First recursive CTE method, if possible
  4. Cursor
  5. The other recursive CTE methods
  6. Quirky update
  7. Join and/or correlated subquery

For further information with performance comparisons of these methods, see this question on http://dba.stackexchange.com:

https://dba.stackexchange.com/questions/19507/running-total-with-count


I've also blogged more details about these comparisons here:

http://www.sqlperformance.com/2012/07/t-sql-queries/running-totals


Also for grouped/partitioned running totals, see the following posts:

http://sqlperformance.com/2014/01/t-sql-queries/grouped-running-totals

Partitioning results in a running totals query

Multiple Running Totals with Group By

  • 1
    thanks! just wanted to mention that in recursive cte x.rt + y.amt have to be cast as decimal if your amt is decimal otherwise it would throw “Types don't match between the anchor and the recursive part” – Jack0fshad0ws Mar 26 '13 at 2:50
  • @Jack0fshad0ws thanks, definitely something to keep in mind, but the answer was based on the question, which had amt int. – Aaron Bertrand Sep 26 '13 at 22:41
  • @AaronBertrand I don't fully understand the problem with quirky update method and I want to know if it will satisfy my needs without any concern. I have to make a raffle where users have points and each point is a chance. I don't have any order. user A 10 points, user B, 25 points, user Z 15 points. So my cumulative chances could be A 10 10, B 25 35, Z 15 50. If order change like B 25 25, Z 15 40, A 10 50 I can raffle without error a random number between 1 and 50. Am I safe using quirky update? – Horaciux Nov 21 '14 at 18:05
  • @Horaciux I'm not sure I understand why you need quirky update at all. But I don't have the capacity at the moment to determine if you are safe... you'll need to test it – Aaron Bertrand Nov 21 '14 at 18:27
  • @AaronBertrand Thanks anyway. I make a full question. dba.stackexchange.com/questions/83322/… – Horaciux Nov 21 '14 at 19:17
6

If you use version 2012, here is a solution

select *, sum(amt) over (order by Tid) as running_total from Transactions 

For earlier versions

select *,(select sum(amt) from Transactions where Tid<=t.Tid) as running_total from Transactions as t
  • got it!! perfect answer. – Pritesh Jul 3 '12 at 12:38
  • 2
    As I posted in my answer, be careful with this method. By default SUM() OVER() uses RANGE UNBOUNDED PRECEDING, which uses an on-disk spool. As the source data gets larger, you will really see the impact of this on-disk spool. If you use ROWS UNBOUNDED PRECEDING it will happen in memory until you reach the very high end... – Aaron Bertrand Jul 3 '12 at 14:53
  • Thanks Aaron Bertrand for your valuable information – Madhivanan Jul 4 '12 at 13:07
  • here how to use a where clause and get the running total as original for the result? – Ivan Lewis Jul 18 '16 at 7:52
1

We're on 2008R2 and I use variables and a temp table. This also allows you to do custom things when calculating each row using a case statement (i.e. certain transactions may act differently, or you may only want a total for specific transaction types)

DECLARE @RunningBalance int = 0
SELECT Tid, Amt, 0 AS RunningBalance
INTO #TxnTable
FROM Transactions
ORDER BY Tid

UPDATE #TxnTable
SET @RunningBalance = RunningBalance = @RunningBalance + Amt

SELECT * FROM #TxnTable
DROP TABLE #TxnTable

We have a transaction table with 2.3 million rows with an item that has over 3,300 transactions, and running this type of query against that takes no time at all.

0

In SQL Server 2008+

SELECT  T1.* ,
        T2.RunningSum
FROM    dbo.Transactions As T1
        CROSS APPLY ( SELECT    SUM(amt) AS RunningSum
                      FROM      dbo.Transactions AS CAT1
                      WHERE     ( CAT1.TId <= T1.TId )
                    ) AS T2

In SQL server 2012+

SELECT  * ,
        SUM(T1.amt) OVER ( ORDER BY T1.TId 
                        ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW ) AS RunningTotal
FROM    dbo.Transactions AS t1
0
select v.ID
,CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), v.EntryDate, 103) + ' '  + convert(VARCHAR(8), v.EntryDate, 14) 
as EntryDate
,case
when v.CreditAmount<0
then
    ISNULL(v.CreditAmount,0) 
    else 
    0 
End  as credit
,case
when v.CreditAmount>0
then
    v.CreditAmount
    else
    0
End  as debit
,Balance = SUM(v.CreditAmount) OVER (ORDER BY v.ID ROWS UNBOUNDED PRECEDING)
      from VendorCredit v
    order by v.EntryDate desc
0

With the 2012 SUM and OVER functions you can now nest sum and counts.

SELECT date, sum(count(DISTINCT unique_id)) OVER (ORDER BY date) AS total_per_date
FROM dbo.table
GROUP BY date

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