68

How do I catch a Ctrl+C in multiprocess python program and exit all processes gracefully, I need the solution to work both on unix and windows. I've tried the following:

import multiprocessing
import time
import signal
import sys

jobs = []

def worker():
    signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, signal_handler)
    while(True):
        time.sleep(1.1234)
        print "Working..."

def signal_handler(signal, frame):
    print 'You pressed Ctrl+C!'
    # for p in jobs:
    #     p.terminate()
    sys.exit(0)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    for i in range(50):
        p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker)
        jobs.append(p)
        p.start()

And it's kind of working, but I don't think it's the right solution.

EDIT: This might be a duplicate of this one

57

The previously accepted solution has race conditions and it does not work with map and async functions.

The correct way to handle Ctrl+C/SIGINT with multiprocessing.Pool is to:

  1. Make the process ignore SIGINT before a process Pool is created. This way created child processes inherit SIGINT handler.
  2. Restore the original SIGINT handler in the parent process after a Pool has been created.
  3. Use map_async and apply_async instead of blocking map and apply.
  4. Wait on the results with timeout because the default blocking waits ignore all signals. This is Python bug https://bugs.python.org/issue8296.

Putting it together:

#!/bin/env python
from __future__ import print_function

import multiprocessing
import os
import signal
import time

def run_worker(delay):
    print("In a worker process", os.getpid())
    time.sleep(delay)

def main():
    print("Initializng 2 workers")
    original_sigint_handler = signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, signal.SIG_IGN)
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(2)
    signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, original_sigint_handler)
    try:
        print("Starting 2 jobs of 5 seconds each")
        res = pool.map_async(run_worker, [5, 5])
        print("Waiting for results")
        res.get(60) # Without the timeout this blocking call ignores all signals.
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        print("Caught KeyboardInterrupt, terminating workers")
        pool.terminate()
    else:
        print("Normal termination")
        pool.close()
    pool.join()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

As @YakovShklarov noted, there is a window of time between ignoring the signal and unignoring it in the parent process, during which the signal can be lost. Using pthread_sigmask instead to temporarily block the delivery of the signal in the parent process would prevent the signal from being lost, however, it is not available in Python-2.

  • 1
    seems like you have to use map_async, not map, can anyone allude as to the difference in single handling? (calling .get on the map_async result didn't seem necessary either) – ThorSummoner Feb 17 '17 at 1:06
  • 1
    @sapht Previously accepted answer: stackoverflow.com/a/11312948/412080 – Maxim Egorushkin Apr 27 '17 at 14:50
  • 2
    This didn't work for me with Python 3.6.1 on Windows 10, KeyboardInterrupt is not caught – szx Jul 2 '17 at 4:13
  • 1
    @Boop I am not sure, one would need to investigate that. – Maxim Egorushkin Sep 8 '17 at 0:16
  • 1
    This solution is not portable as it works only on Unix. Moreover, it would not work if the user sets the maxtasksperchild Pool parameter. The newly created processes would inherit the standard SIGINT handler again. The pebble library disables SIGINT by default for the user as soon as the new process is created. – noxdafox Sep 12 '17 at 6:47
34

The solution is based on this link and this link and it solved the problem, I had to moved to Pool though:

import multiprocessing
import time
import signal
import sys

def init_worker():
    signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, signal.SIG_IGN)

def worker():
    while(True):
        time.sleep(1.1234)
        print "Working..."

if __name__ == "__main__":
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(50, init_worker)
    try:
        for i in range(50):
            pool.apply_async(worker)

        time.sleep(10)
        pool.close()
        pool.join()

    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        print "Caught KeyboardInterrupt, terminating workers"
        pool.terminate()
        pool.join()
  • That's a bit too late: there is a race condition window between fork() return in the child process and signal() call. The signal must be blocked before forking. – Maxim Egorushkin Jul 3 '12 at 15:55
  • 1
    @MaximYegorushkin - the signal is blocked in init_worker which is called before the apply_async - is that what you're talking about? – zenpoy Jul 3 '12 at 16:06
  • What I mean is that the signal must be blocked before the child process is forked and unblocked after. This way the child inherits the signal mask and has no chance to receive the signal. – Maxim Egorushkin Jul 3 '12 at 16:19
  • 6
    This only works because of the time.sleep. If you try to get() the results of the map_async call instead, the interrupt is delayed until processing is complete. – Clément Jun 3 '15 at 17:25
  • 1
    Sure it works. But it's wrong. From the docs: "each worker process will call initializer(*initargs) when it starts." That's "when", not "before". So: a race condition. Here's what can happen: The subprocess is created, but before signal.signal() completes, SIGINT is sent! The subprocess aborts with an uncaught KeyboardInterrupt. This is rare but there are no guarantees it won't happen. (Actually it might not be so rare if you're spawning tons of workers.) If you don't block, the worst thing that could happen would seem to be just crud on your terminal. Still, this is bad practice. – Yakov Shklarov Mar 8 '17 at 8:06
11

Just handle KeyboardInterrupt-SystemExit exceptions in your worker process:

def worker():
    while(True):
        try:
            msg = self.msg_queue.get()
        except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
            print("Exiting...")
            break
  • For signals that make Python raise SystemExit, this indeed works, on Python 3.6, too. I wonder though, what signals does that include? I would guess SIGKILL and SIGTERM ...? – Petri Jan 17 '17 at 8:07
  • 1
    You can easily check which signals that includes and the answer is: I think none. SystemExit is only raised by sys.exit according to the docs. Just execute try: time.sleep(60) except BaseException as e: print(e) and you'll see if a specific signal is caught (ime only SIGINT). That's what the manpage states, too. – t.animal May 15 '17 at 15:37

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.