50

I have a multithreaded program where I create a generator function and then pass it to new threads. I want it to be shared/global in nature so each thread can get the next value from the generator.

Is it safe to use a generator like this, or will I run into problems/conditions accessing the shared generator from multiple threads?

If not, is there a better way to approach the problem? I need something that will cycle through a list and produce the next value for whichever thread calls it.

6 Answers 6

63

It's not thread-safe; simultaneous calls may interleave, and mess with the local variables.

The common approach is to use the master-slave pattern (now called farmer-worker pattern in PC). Make a third thread which generates data, and add a Queue between the master and the slaves, where slaves will read from the queue, and the master will write to it. The standard queue module provides the necessary thread safety and arranges to block the master until the slaves are ready to read more data.

1
  • 9
    Definitely +1 for Queue.Queue, great way to organize threading system when applicable (which is most of the time, and definitely for this task). Jul 15, 2009 at 13:46
54

Edited to add benchmark below.

You can wrap a generator with a lock. For example,

import threading
class LockedIterator(object):
    def __init__(self, it):
        self.lock = threading.Lock()
        self.it = it.__iter__()

    def __iter__(self): return self

    def next(self):
        self.lock.acquire()
        try:
            return self.it.next()
        finally:
            self.lock.release()

gen = [x*2 for x in [1,2,3,4]]
g2 = LockedIterator(gen)
print list(g2)

Locking takes 50ms on my system, Queue takes 350ms. Queue is useful when you really do have a queue; for example, if you have incoming HTTP requests and you want to queue them for processing by worker threads. (That doesn't fit in the Python iterator model--once an iterator runs out of items, it's done.) If you really do have an iterator, then LockedIterator is a faster and simpler way to make it thread safe.

from datetime import datetime
import threading
num_worker_threads = 4

class LockedIterator(object):
    def __init__(self, it):
        self.lock = threading.Lock()
        self.it = it.__iter__()

    def __iter__(self): return self

    def next(self):
        self.lock.acquire()
        try:
            return self.it.next()
        finally:
            self.lock.release()

def test_locked(it):
    it = LockedIterator(it)
    def worker():
        try:
            for i in it:
                pass
        except Exception, e:
            print e
            raise

    threads = []
    for i in range(num_worker_threads):
        t = threading.Thread(target=worker)
        threads.append(t)
        t.start()

    for t in threads:
        t.join()

def test_queue(it):
    from Queue import Queue
    def worker():
        try:
            while True:
                item = q.get()
                q.task_done()
        except Exception, e:
            print e
            raise

    q = Queue()
    for i in range(num_worker_threads):
         t = threading.Thread(target=worker)
         t.setDaemon(True)
         t.start()

    t1 = datetime.now()

    for item in it:
        q.put(item)

    q.join()

start_time = datetime.now()
it = [x*2 for x in range(1,10000)]

test_locked(it)
#test_queue(it)
end_time = datetime.now()
took = end_time-start_time
print "took %.01f" % ((took.seconds + took.microseconds/1000000.0)*1000)
1
  • 1
    Less efficient then using a Queue.Queue, but beautifully done.
    – elifiner
    Jul 15, 2009 at 20:41
6

No, they are not thread-safe. You can find interesting info about generators and multi-threading in:

http://www.dabeaz.com/generators/Generators.pdf

2

The generator object itself is thread-safe as any PyObject protected by the GIL. But the thread trying to get the next element from the generator which is already in execution state in other thread (executing the generator code between the yield's) would get ValueError:

ValueError: generator already executing

Sample code:

from threading import Thread
from time import sleep

def gen():
    sleep(1)
    yield

g = gen()

Thread(target=g.__next__).start()
Thread(target=g.__next__).start()

Results in:

Exception in thread Thread-2:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/lib/python3.8/threading.py", line 932, in _bootstrap_inner
    self.run()
  File "/usr/lib/python3.8/threading.py", line 870, in run
    self._target(*self._args, **self._kwargs)
ValueError: generator already executing

But, actually this is not related to threading at all. And could be reproduced inside a single thread:

def gen():
    yield next(g)

g = gen()

next(g)
1

Courtesy of IIRC python freenode, here is a working solutions for python 3.x

Generators are not thread safe by default, but heres how to make them to be thread safe

def my_generator():
    while True:
        for x in range(10):
            yield x

class LockedIterator(object):
    def __init__(self, it):
        self._lock = threading.Lock()
        self._it = iter(it)

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    def __next__(self):
        with self._lock:
            return next(self._it)

n = LockedIterator(my_generator)

next(n)
next(n)
next(n)

OR use a function

def threadsafe_iter(iterable):
    lock = threading.Lock()
    iterator = iter(iterable)
    while True:
        with lock:
            for value in iterator:
                break
            else:
                return
        yield value

n = threadsafe_iter(my_generator)

next(n)
next(n)
next(n)
-15

It depends on which python implementation you're using. In CPython, the GIL makes all operations on python objects threadsafe, as only one thread can be executing code at any given time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Interpreter_Lock

3
  • 1
    "the GIL makes all operations on python objects threadsafe" - huh? all operations are not atomic Jul 15, 2009 at 18:16
  • 7
    This is dangerously misleading. The GIL only means that Python code won't corrupt the Python state in a multithreaded environment: you can't change threads in the middle of a bytecode op. (For example, you can modify a shared dict without corrupting it.) You can still change threads between any two bytecode ops. Jul 15, 2009 at 19:45
  • No, the GIL doesn’t prevent two threads from altering a shared resource. The GIL only prevents parallel execution of threads, you still have to deal with concurrent access and arbitrary thread switches.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Jan 31, 2019 at 11:35

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