I have an Arabic file encoded in ISO8859-15. How can I convert it into UTF8?
I used iconv but it doesn't work for me.

iconv -f ISO-8859-15 -t UTF-8 Myfile.txt

I wanted to attach the file, but I don't know how.

  • 5
    Does iconv print an error message, or does it convert incorrectly? (Incidentally, you might accept more of the answers you have received to earlier questions. The answerers would appreciate this.) – thb Jul 3 '12 at 18:33
  • No it doesn't print an error. I mean it converts the file incorrectly. I checked the encoding of the file, and found it ISO-8859-15. – Hakim Jul 3 '12 at 18:36
  • how did u determine it to be ISO-8895-15? – pizza Jul 3 '12 at 18:40
  • I opened the file, tried to Save As it. In the window appeared, the encoding of the file was ISO-8859-15. Is there another way to determine the encoding of the file? – Hakim Jul 3 '12 at 18:43
  • 5
    ISO 8859-15 cannot represent Arabic text. Perhaps you mean 8859-6 or some legacy encoding? See, for a start, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO/IEC_8859-6 – tripleee Aug 31 '12 at 12:14
up vote 36 down vote accepted

Could it be that your file is not ISO-8859-15 encoded? You should be able to check with the file command:

file YourFile.txt

Also, you can use iconv without providing the encoding of the original file:

iconv -t UTF-8 YourFile.txt

  • 1
    How would the file command be able to tell you which encoding is appropriate to understand the file's content? – Thorsten Staerk Aug 18 '15 at 21:11
  • 4
    @ThorstenStaerk I don't think it does. The man page says this: "If no from-encoding is given, the default is derived from the current locale's character encoding." So I believe HighKing's comment about not providing the encoding of the original file is wrong. – Stéphane Jun 11 '16 at 0:53
  • The file utility do not always guess the correct encoding. You need to manually to judge the content if it is understandable by opening the file with different encoding. – code4j May 31 '17 at 18:40

I found this to work for me:

iconv -f ISO-8859-14 Agreement.txt -t UTF-8 -o agreement.txt
  • 1
    while doing file myfile.txt, it gives ISO-8859. So, i have tried with yours (except -14). It shows ISO-8859 is not supported. And finally just I have added -14 along with ISO-8859-14 and worked.. – Spike Oct 5 '16 at 10:01
  • 1
    I have seen usually ISO-8859-1 – Sergio Abreu Feb 22 '17 at 3:03

I have ubuntu 14 and the other answers where no working for me

iconv -f ISO-8859-1 -t UTF-8 in.tex > out.tex

I found this command here

in my case, the file command tells a wrong encoding, so i tried converting with all the possible encodings, and found out the right one.

execute this script and check the result file.

for i in `iconv -l`
do
   echo $i
   iconv -f $i -t UTF-8 yourfile | grep "hint to tell converted success or not"
done &>/tmp/converted

You can use ISO-8859-9 encoding:

iconv -f ISO-8859-9 Agreement.txt -t UTF-8 -o agreement.txt

Iconv just writes the converted text to stdout. You have to use -o OUTPUTFILE.txt as an parameter or write stdout to a file. (iconv -f x -t z filename.txt > OUTPUTFILE.txt or iconv -f x -t z < filename.txt > OUTPUTFILE.txt in some iconv versions)

Synopsis

iconv -f encoding -t encoding inputfile

Description

The iconv program converts the encoding of characters in inputfile from one coded character set to another. 
**The result is written to standard output unless otherwise specified by the --output option.**

--from-code, -f encoding

Convert characters from encoding

--to-code, -t encoding

Convert characters to encoding

--list

List known coded character sets

--output, -o file

Specify output file (instead of stdout)

--verbose

Print progress information.

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