Is there any C# function which could be used to escape and un-escape a string, which could be used to fill in the content of an XML element?

I am using VSTS 2008 + C# + .Net 3.0.

EDIT 1: I am concatenating simple and short XML file and I do not use serialization, so I need to explicitly escape XML character by hand, for example, I need to put a<b into <foo></foo>, so I need escape string a<b and put it into element foo.

10 Answers 10

up vote 68 down vote accepted
public static string XmlEscape(string unescaped)
{
    XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
    XmlNode node = doc.CreateElement("root");
    node.InnerText = unescaped;
    return node.InnerXml;
}

public static string XmlUnescape(string escaped)
{
    XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
    XmlNode node = doc.CreateElement("root");
    node.InnerXml = escaped;
    return node.InnerText;
}
  • 5
    You don't even need to append the element to the document. However, I'd still say that it's best not to try to do this in the first place - it sounds like George is making work for himself by doing things by hand... – Jon Skeet Jul 15 '09 at 17:01
  • 12
    I really dislike this answer because it's too heavy-weight. XmlDocument is going to use XmlReader/XmlWriter to do the real work, so why not cut to the chase and avoid that heavy DOM? – Steven Sudit Jul 15 '09 at 19:49
  • 6
    @Will, the OP asked for a function that will escape a text which could be put in a XML element and not attribute. My function doesn't escape single or double quotes because they can be put in XML elements. – Darin Dimitrov Mar 16 '10 at 12:24
  • 5
    @darin good point, and one that should be stressed. I am satisfied with the result of this conversation, and withdraw my reservations. Good day, sir. – Will Mar 16 '10 at 13:15
  • 1
    I wonder if HttpUtility.HtmlEncode from System.Web could safely be used? – Pooven May 1 '13 at 18:41

SecurityElement.Escape(string s)

  • 5
    This answer escapes quotes, unlike the selected answer. – Will Mar 15 '10 at 16:04
  • 1
    This answer doesn't seem to work with invalid characters like � – Haacked Mar 16 '12 at 3:11
  • 13
    And how do you un-escape? – Gondy Apr 17 '12 at 9:59
  • 1
    This answer is incomplete. It only answers half of the question. – Brian Webster Sep 13 '12 at 20:43
  • 1
    Agree with above comments - incomplete and not 100% accurate. – G. Stoynev Apr 5 '13 at 0:05

EDIT: You say "I am concatenating simple and short XML file and I do not use serialization, so I need to explicitly escape XML character by hand".

I would strongly advise you not to do it by hand. Use the XML APIs to do it all for you - read in the original files, merge the two into a single document however you need to (you probably want to use XmlDocument.ImportNode), and then write it out again. You don't want to write your own XML parsers/formatters. Serialization is somewhat irrelevant here.

If you can give us a short but complete example of exactly what you're trying to do, we can probably help you to avoid having to worry about escaping in the first place.


Original answer

It's not entirely clear what you mean, but normally XML APIs do this for you. You set the text in a node, and it will automatically escape anything it needs to. For example:

LINQ to XML example:

using System;
using System.Xml.Linq;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        XElement element = new XElement("tag",
                                        "Brackets & stuff <>");

        Console.WriteLine(element);
    }
}

DOM example:

using System;
using System.Xml;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
        XmlElement element = doc.CreateElement("tag");
        element.InnerText = "Brackets & stuff <>";
        Console.WriteLine(element.OuterXml);
    }
}

Output from both examples:

<tag>Brackets &amp; stuff &lt;&gt;</tag>

That's assuming you want XML escaping, of course. If you're not, please post more details.

  • Thanks Jon, I have put more details into my original post EDIT 1 section. Appreciate if you could give me some comments and advice. :-) – George2 Jul 15 '09 at 16:40
  • "after XML escaping" -- you mean? Could you speak in some other words please? English is not my native language. :-) – George2 Jul 15 '09 at 16:41
  • Hi Jon, how to un-escape from XML format into normal string format, i.e. from input "Brackets &amp; stuff &lt;&gt;", we get output "Brackets & stuff <>"? – George2 Jul 15 '09 at 16:50
  • 1
    @George2: You ask the XElement for its Value, or the XmlElement for its InnerText. – Jon Skeet Jul 15 '09 at 16:56

Thanks to @sehe for the one-line escape:

var escaped = new System.Xml.Linq.XText(unescaped).ToString();

I add to it the one-line un-escape:

var unescapedAgain = System.Xml.XmlReader.Create(new StringReader("<r>" + escaped + "</r>")).ReadElementString();
  • 2
    This doesn't appear to handle quotes " correctly – Philip Pittle May 16 '15 at 1:24
  • XText does not escape quotes. – Mert Gülsoy Aug 26 '15 at 9:41
  • This doesn't work for `` (character '\v') – BurnsBA Jul 13 at 18:18

George, it's simple. Always use the XML APIs to handle XML. They do all the escaping and unescaping for you.

Never create XML by appending strings.

  • Words to live by. There are many XML API options available, but the one thing we should all agree on is that manual string concatenation is not acceptable. – Steven Sudit Jul 15 '09 at 19:51
  • While I generally agree with this, there may be some very rare cases where manual escaping may be necessary. For example, while creating XML documentation using Roslyn. – svick May 1 '12 at 15:56
  • @svick: why not create the XML using LINQ to XML, and then use .ToString()? – John Saunders May 1 '12 at 16:37
  • @JohnSaunders, because Roslyn has its own set of XML classes, like XmlElementSyntax. And it's also complicated by the fact that you need to generate the /// too. And I can't generate each line as a separate XObject, because that wouldn't work for multiline tags. – svick May 1 '12 at 17:07
  • 1
    @svick: so generate the xml, all on one line, stick /// in front of it, then reformat the code. Not a huge big deal, and certainly very much a corner case. If absolutely necessary, I'm sure you could create a custom XmlWriter to do line breaks and whitespace the way you'd like, but placing /// in front of new lines. Alternatively, use an XSLT to pretty-print the XML. But in any case, XML should still be generated by an XML API. – John Saunders May 1 '12 at 19:41

And if you want, like me when I found this question, to escape XML node names, like for example when reading from an XML serialization, use the easiest way:

XmlConvert.EncodeName(string nameToEscape)

It will also escape spaces and any non-valid characters for XML elements.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.security.securityelement.escape%28VS.80%29.aspx

  • I think, based on the questions, that they just want inner text. Your solution will work, but is somewhat overkill as it's intended to also handle things like element and attribute names.\ – Sean Duggan Mar 19 '14 at 16:20
  • Well I got here trying to escape node names anything and thought my findings could help anybody in the future. I also don't see what's the "overkill" but it's OK. ;) – CharlieBrown Mar 20 '14 at 10:30
  • Oh, it's useful information. :) I just figured I'd point out that one of the reasons you might not have gotten upvoted was because people might feel that you're not answering the question at hand. – Sean Duggan Mar 20 '14 at 11:35
  • The link leads to docs for SecurityElement.Escape(String), was this intentional? XmlConvert.EncodeName(String) has it's own page. I know it has been a few years since this was asked, but how do I know which one to use? Don't they do the same thing but in different ways? – micnil Sep 17 at 12:31

WARNING: Necromancing

Still Darin Dimitrov's answer + System.Security.SecurityElement.Escape(string s) isn't complete.

In XML 1.1, the simplest and safest way is to just encode EVERYTHING.
Like &#09; for \t.
It isn't supported at all in XML 1.0.
For XML 1.0, one possible workaround is to base-64 encode the text containing the character(s).

//string EncodedXml = SpecialXmlEscape("привет мир");
//Console.WriteLine(EncodedXml);
//string DecodedXml = XmlUnescape(EncodedXml);
//Console.WriteLine(DecodedXml);
public static string SpecialXmlEscape(string input)
{
    //string content = System.Xml.XmlConvert.EncodeName("\t");
    //string content = System.Security.SecurityElement.Escape("\t");
    //string strDelimiter = System.Web.HttpUtility.HtmlEncode("\t"); // XmlEscape("\t"); //XmlDecode("&#09;");
    //strDelimiter = XmlUnescape("&#59;");
    //Console.WriteLine(strDelimiter);
    //Console.WriteLine(string.Format("&#{0};", (int)';'));
    //Console.WriteLine(System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.HeaderName);
    //Console.WriteLine(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.HeaderName);


    string strXmlText = "";

    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
        return input;


    System.Text.StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; ++i)
    {
        sb.AppendFormat("&#{0};", (int)input[i]);
    }

    strXmlText = sb.ToString();
    sb.Clear();
    sb = null;

    return strXmlText;
} // End Function SpecialXmlEscape

XML 1.0:

public static string Base64Encode(string plainText)
{
    var plainTextBytes = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(plainText);
    return System.Convert.ToBase64String(plainTextBytes);
}

public static string Base64Decode(string base64EncodedData)
{
    var base64EncodedBytes = System.Convert.FromBase64String(base64EncodedData);
    return System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(base64EncodedBytes);
}
  • So in XML 1.1, how do you escape everything? – Philip Pittle May 16 '15 at 1:28
  • @Philip Pittle: See SpecialXmlEscape – Stefan Steiger Dec 10 '15 at 12:57

Following functions will do the work. Didn't test against XmlDocument, but I guess this is much faster.

public static string XmlEncode(string value)
{
    System.Xml.XmlWriterSettings settings = new System.Xml.XmlWriterSettings 
    {
        ConformanceLevel = System.Xml.ConformanceLevel.Fragment
    };

    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

    using (var writer = System.Xml.XmlWriter.Create(builder, settings))
    {
        writer.WriteString(value);
    }

    return builder.ToString();
}

public static string XmlDecode(string xmlEncodedValue)
{
    System.Xml.XmlReaderSettings settings = new System.Xml.XmlReaderSettings
    {
        ConformanceLevel = System.Xml.ConformanceLevel.Fragment
    };

    using (var stringReader = new System.IO.StringReader(xmlEncodedValue))
    {
        using (var xmlReader = System.Xml.XmlReader.Create(stringReader, settings))
        {
            xmlReader.Read();
            return xmlReader.Value;
        }
    }
}

Using a third-party library (Newtonsoft.Json) as alternative:

public static string XmlEncode(string unescaped)
{
    if (unescaped == null) return null;
    return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(unescaped); ;
}

public static string XmlDecode(string escaped)
{
    if (escaped == null) return null;
    return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(escaped, typeof(string)).ToString();
}

Example:

a<b <==> "a&lt;b"

<foo></foo> <==> "foo&gt;&lt;/foo&gt;"

Another take based on John Skeet's answer that doesn't return the tags:

void Main()
{
    XmlString("Brackets & stuff <> and \"quotes\"").Dump();
}

public string XmlString(string text)
{
    return new XElement("t", text).LastNode.ToString();
} 

This returns just the value passed in, in XML encoded format:

Brackets &amp; stuff &lt;&gt; and "quotes"

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