78

I am developing one application.In that i am using the imageviews.SO before changeing the UIImageview image I need to take that image in UIimage obejct and compare with another UIImage object for finding both are sam or not. So please tell me how to do that one.

2
  • Accepted answer is in [this][1] thread [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/3400707/… Commented Jul 5, 2012 at 11:01
  • You should maintain the application state and have a data model. This way you will have a clue regarding what's going on in your app.
    – pronebird
    Commented Oct 6, 2017 at 16:12

18 Answers 18

139

One way is to convert them to image data first, and then compare that.

- (BOOL)image:(UIImage *)image1 isEqualTo:(UIImage *)image2
{
    NSData *data1 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image1);
    NSData *data2 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image2);

    return [data1 isEqual:data2];
}
8
  • 7
    this is better implemented as a category
    – abbood
    Commented Apr 3, 2013 at 16:57
  • 1
    should this use isEqualToData:? legitimate question - I'm not sure when or if isEqual: will ever fail with NSData objects, but it seems logical to me to use the conditional test designed specifically for the class, right?
    – toblerpwn
    Commented Apr 18, 2013 at 21:37
  • UIImagePNGRepresentation is broken in that it does not take into account orientation. Two logically identical images with different orientations may not pass this check. Commented Nov 25, 2013 at 16:12
  • doens't work if one of the image is saved in CoreDate (as NSData) and the other id imageNamed
    – Sam
    Commented Dec 24, 2013 at 15:02
  • 10
    The comparison is quite time eating.
    – tounaobun
    Commented Mar 31, 2015 at 8:50
31

A Swift implementation of @Simon's answer:

func image(image1: UIImage, isEqualTo image2: UIImage) -> Bool {
    let data1: NSData = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image1)!
    let data2: NSData = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image2)!
    return data1.isEqual(data2)
}

Or by extending UIImage based on @nhgrif's suggestion:

import UIKit

extension UIImage {

    func isEqualToImage(image: UIImage) -> Bool {
        let data1: NSData = UIImagePNGRepresentation(self)!
        let data2: NSData = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image)!
        return data1.isEqual(data2)
    }

}
5
  • Yes I agree, however I was only translating code from another answer Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 9:03
  • Updated answer to include an example of your suggestion @nhgrif Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 9:16
  • 2
    Now my only comment would be that rather than force unwrapping and crashing, we should return false if either is nil. guard let data1 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(self), data2 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image) else { return false } return data1 == data2
    – nhgrif
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 12:54
  • In swift 4 need to write it like this let data1: NSData = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image1)! as NSData Commented Aug 29, 2018 at 14:54
  • 1
    Posted an update to this answer by converting to Swift 4 Commented Feb 27, 2019 at 21:19
18

Updated Mark Tickner's solution to Swift 4

import UIKit

extension UIImage {

    func isEqualToImage(_ image: UIImage) -> Bool {
        let data1 = self.pngData()
        let data2 = image.pngData()
        return data1 == data2
    }

}

The two variables are probably overkill, but they might help explain to someone new to this. Could shorten to:

import UIKit

extension UIImage {

    func isEqualToImage(_ image: UIImage) -> Bool {
        return self.pngData() == image.pngData()
    }

}
2
  • @YogeshPatel I couldn't comment, you'll have to try it. If you do, update us here! Commented Mar 26, 2020 at 14:13
  • 2
    I already did this but it's not working for me. That's why i told you. can you please help me on this! Commented Mar 26, 2020 at 16:35
10

when both using [UIImage imageNamed:], we can use isEqual:, otherwise we could compare the data.

4
  • This isn't a really safe solution, especially when using it within an UITableView. I recommend using @Simon's solution.
    – Sebyddd
    Commented Oct 14, 2014 at 20:38
  • @Sebyddd really? have you tried using simon's solution while rendering UITableViewCells? that comparison operation is pretty expensive.. and so scrolling will be pretty choppy.. true story
    – abbood
    Commented Jun 3, 2015 at 9:01
  • @abbood yes, it might be more expensive, but from my tests this one didn't always return the right result, for some reason. Two NSObjects are considered equal if they point to the same memory address. That's what isEqual does. Therefore imageNamed returns a new instance at a different memory address. It's not really stable.
    – Sebyddd
    Commented Jun 3, 2015 at 9:08
  • @Sebyddd The default implementation of isEqual: inherited from NSObject is a simple reference comparison, yes. However some objects override this default implementation. One I know for sure, for example, is NSString, whose isEqual: is functionally equivalent to isEqualToString:, both of which are value comparisons--not reference comparisons. I cannot comment as to UIImage's implementation of isEqual (whether it has overridden the inherited method or not).
    – nhgrif
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 0:14
9

The right answer depends on "What kind of comparison you want to do?".

  1. The easiest way is just to compare data.
  2. If you want to know whether image were created from one local file – you can use -isEqual: (but there is an dangerous way, because I'm not sure, what happens if image cache clear for some reason).
  3. The hard way is provide per-pixel comparison (surely, system will spend more time on it). I can't provide the code from our company's library because of legal reason :(

But you can check good example on facebook's ios-snapshot-test-case project here: link right to the needed file. You can use performance tests to measure process time.

For the Great Justice I'll copy code from there below:

- (BOOL)fb_compareWithImage:(UIImage *)image tolerance:(CGFloat)tolerance
{
  NSAssert(CGSizeEqualToSize(self.size, image.size), @"Images must be same size.");

  CGSize referenceImageSize = CGSizeMake(CGImageGetWidth(self.CGImage), CGImageGetHeight(self.CGImage));
  CGSize imageSize = CGSizeMake(CGImageGetWidth(image.CGImage), CGImageGetHeight(image.CGImage));

  // The images have the equal size, so we could use the smallest amount of bytes because of byte padding
  size_t minBytesPerRow = MIN(CGImageGetBytesPerRow(self.CGImage), CGImageGetBytesPerRow(image.CGImage));
  size_t referenceImageSizeBytes = referenceImageSize.height * minBytesPerRow;
  void *referenceImagePixels = calloc(1, referenceImageSizeBytes);
  void *imagePixels = calloc(1, referenceImageSizeBytes);

  if (!referenceImagePixels || !imagePixels) {
    free(referenceImagePixels);
    free(imagePixels);
    return NO;
  }

  CGContextRef referenceImageContext = CGBitmapContextCreate(referenceImagePixels,
                                                             referenceImageSize.width,
                                                             referenceImageSize.height,
                                                             CGImageGetBitsPerComponent(self.CGImage),
                                                             minBytesPerRow,
                                                             CGImageGetColorSpace(self.CGImage),
                                                             (CGBitmapInfo)kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedLast
                                                             );
  CGContextRef imageContext = CGBitmapContextCreate(imagePixels,
                                                    imageSize.width,
                                                    imageSize.height,
                                                    CGImageGetBitsPerComponent(image.CGImage),
                                                    minBytesPerRow,
                                                    CGImageGetColorSpace(image.CGImage),
                                                    (CGBitmapInfo)kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedLast
                                                    );

  if (!referenceImageContext || !imageContext) {
    CGContextRelease(referenceImageContext);
    CGContextRelease(imageContext);
    free(referenceImagePixels);
    free(imagePixels);
    return NO;
  }

  CGContextDrawImage(referenceImageContext, CGRectMake(0, 0, referenceImageSize.width, referenceImageSize.height), self.CGImage);
  CGContextDrawImage(imageContext, CGRectMake(0, 0, imageSize.width, imageSize.height), image.CGImage);

  CGContextRelease(referenceImageContext);
  CGContextRelease(imageContext);

  BOOL imageEqual = YES;

  // Do a fast compare if we can
  if (tolerance == 0) {
    imageEqual = (memcmp(referenceImagePixels, imagePixels, referenceImageSizeBytes) == 0);
  } else {
    // Go through each pixel in turn and see if it is different
    const NSInteger pixelCount = referenceImageSize.width * referenceImageSize.height;

    FBComparePixel *p1 = referenceImagePixels;
    FBComparePixel *p2 = imagePixels;

    NSInteger numDiffPixels = 0;
    for (int n = 0; n < pixelCount; ++n) {
      // If this pixel is different, increment the pixel diff count and see
      // if we have hit our limit.
      if (p1->raw != p2->raw) {
        numDiffPixels ++;

        CGFloat percent = (CGFloat)numDiffPixels / pixelCount;
        if (percent > tolerance) {
          imageEqual = NO;
          break;
        }
      }

      p1++;
      p2++;
    }
  }

  free(referenceImagePixels);
  free(imagePixels);

  return imageEqual;
}
7

My preferred (Swift) solution

import UIKit

func ==(lhs: UIImage, rhs: UIImage) -> Bool
{
  guard let data1 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(lhs),
            data2 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(rhs)
    else { return false }

  return data1.isEqual(data2)
}
1
  • Using the default implementation with isEqual didn't work for me either, this was the only solution that worked for me.
    – inexcitus
    Commented Dec 16, 2018 at 10:51
7

Converting the images to JPG / PNG, or relying on accessibility identifiers is either an expensive operation, or fragile & prone to failure.

Here, I follow the suggestion provided by Apple at the following link:

The isEqual(:) method is the only reliable way to determine whether two images contain the same image data. The image objects you create may be different from each other, even when you initialize them with the same cached image data. The only way to determine their equality is to use the isEqual(:) method, which compares the actual image data. Listing 1 illustrates the correct and incorrect ways to compare images.

To simplify things, I create the following extension for doing comparisons, so that I can avoid the issue of converting the first image:

import UIKit

extension UIImage {
    func isEqual(to image: UIImage) -> Bool {
        return isEqual(image)
    }
}

With this, I can now setup an example to compare it on a pair of images:

let imageA = UIImage(named: "a")!
let imageB = UIImage(named: "b")!
let imageC = UIImage(named: "a")!

print(imageA.isEqual(to: imageA)) // true
print(imageA.isEqual(to: imageC)) // true
print(imageA.isEqual(to: imageB)) // false
1
  • 9
    Despite Apple's documentation, I found that isEqual does not correctly compare the data of two UIImage instances in Obj-C; it returns false for two UIImage instances that contain the same data. Converting the UIImage instances to PNGs and comparing the raw data (as is done in Simon's answer) is the only way I've found to correctly do the comparison with Obj-C.
    – BinaryNate
    Commented Nov 8, 2017 at 2:32
7

Swift 4.x version of Facebook's comparison algorithm:

/// Value in range 0...100 %
typealias Percentage = Float

// See: https://github.com/facebookarchive/ios-snapshot-test-case/blob/master/FBSnapshotTestCase/Categories/UIImage%2BCompare.m
private func compare(tolerance: Percentage, expected: Data, observed: Data) throws -> Bool {
    guard let expectedUIImage = UIImage(data: expected), let observedUIImage = UIImage(data: observed) else {
        throw Error.unableToGetUIImageFromData
    }
    guard let expectedCGImage = expectedUIImage.cgImage, let observedCGImage = observedUIImage.cgImage else {
        throw Error.unableToGetCGImageFromData
    }
    guard let expectedColorSpace = expectedCGImage.colorSpace, let observedColorSpace = observedCGImage.colorSpace else {
        throw Error.unableToGetColorSpaceFromCGImage
    }
    if expectedCGImage.width != observedCGImage.width || expectedCGImage.height != observedCGImage.height {
        throw Error.imagesHasDifferentSizes
    }
    let imageSize = CGSize(width: expectedCGImage.width, height: expectedCGImage.height)
    let numberOfPixels = Int(imageSize.width * imageSize.height)

    // Checking that our `UInt32` buffer has same number of bytes as image has.
    let bytesPerRow = min(expectedCGImage.bytesPerRow, observedCGImage.bytesPerRow)
    assert(MemoryLayout<UInt32>.stride == bytesPerRow / Int(imageSize.width))

    let expectedPixels = UnsafeMutablePointer<UInt32>.allocate(capacity: numberOfPixels)
    let observedPixels = UnsafeMutablePointer<UInt32>.allocate(capacity: numberOfPixels)

    let expectedPixelsRaw = UnsafeMutableRawPointer(expectedPixels)
    let observedPixelsRaw = UnsafeMutableRawPointer(observedPixels)

    let bitmapInfo = CGBitmapInfo(rawValue: CGImageAlphaInfo.premultipliedLast.rawValue)
    guard let expectedContext = CGContext(data: expectedPixelsRaw, width: Int(imageSize.width), height: Int(imageSize.height),
                                          bitsPerComponent: expectedCGImage.bitsPerComponent, bytesPerRow: bytesPerRow,
                                          space: expectedColorSpace, bitmapInfo: bitmapInfo.rawValue) else {
        expectedPixels.deallocate()
        observedPixels.deallocate()
        throw Error.unableToInitializeContext
    }
    guard let observedContext = CGContext(data: observedPixelsRaw, width: Int(imageSize.width), height: Int(imageSize.height),
                                          bitsPerComponent: observedCGImage.bitsPerComponent, bytesPerRow: bytesPerRow,
                                          space: observedColorSpace, bitmapInfo: bitmapInfo.rawValue) else {
        expectedPixels.deallocate()
        observedPixels.deallocate()
        throw Error.unableToInitializeContext
    }

    expectedContext.draw(expectedCGImage, in: CGRect(origin: .zero, size: imageSize))
    observedContext.draw(observedCGImage, in: CGRect(origin: .zero, size: imageSize))

    let expectedBuffer = UnsafeBufferPointer(start: expectedPixels, count: numberOfPixels)
    let observedBuffer = UnsafeBufferPointer(start: observedPixels, count: numberOfPixels)

    var isEqual = true
    if tolerance == 0 {
        isEqual = expectedBuffer.elementsEqual(observedBuffer)
    } else {
        // Go through each pixel in turn and see if it is different
        var numDiffPixels = 0
        for pixel in 0 ..< numberOfPixels where expectedBuffer[pixel] != observedBuffer[pixel] {
            // If this pixel is different, increment the pixel diff count and see if we have hit our limit.
            numDiffPixels += 1
            let percentage = 100 * Float(numDiffPixels) / Float(numberOfPixels)
            if percentage > tolerance {
                isEqual = false
                break
            }
        }
    }

    expectedPixels.deallocate()
    observedPixels.deallocate()

    return isEqual
}
6

I did some changes to Mark's answer and used Data and elementsEqual instead NSData and isEqual.

extension UIImage {
    func isEqual(to image: UIImage) -> Bool {
        guard let data1: Data = UIImagePNGRepresentation(self),
            let data2: Data = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image) else {
                return false
        }
        return data1.elementsEqual(data2)
    }
}
5

Swift 3

There is two ways. Like:-

1) Use isEqual() function.

 self.image?.isEqual(UIImage(named: "add-image"))

2) Use accessibilityIdentifier

Set the accessibilityIdentifier as image Name

myImageView.image?.accessibilityIdentifier = "add-image"

Then Use the following code.

extension UIImageView
{
func getFileName() -> String? {
// First set accessibilityIdentifier of image before calling.
let imgName = self.image?.accessibilityIdentifier
return imgName
}
}

Finally, The calling way of method to identify

myImageView.getFileName()
3
  • myImageView.getFileName() -> Always Returns Nil.. i'd already set the accessibility identifier still this method getFileName always returns nil.
    – Yash Bedi
    Commented Aug 30, 2017 at 5:51
  • Sorry Abdul, neither these answers work for me in Swift 3.0 iOS 10.x Commented Sep 8, 2017 at 19:41
  • @YashBedi add this myImageView.image?.accessibilityIdentifier = "add-image" in viewdidload. Commented Sep 12, 2017 at 6:44
3

Compare the image size initially

For a less expensive method, compare the image size initially. Even if there is a small change inside an image, the size will be different.

NSData *data1 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image1);
NSData *data2 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image2);

if(data1.length == data2.length) {
    // if required, compare the data to confirm it
    if(data1 isEqual:data2) {
        // images are exactly same
    } else {
        // even though size is same images are different
    }
} else {
    // images are different.
}

Successfully tested in comparing images from same source (same dimension, format etc).

4
  • I am sure that was isEqual does in the first place so no need to manually check lengths maybe?
    – pronebird
    Commented Sep 17, 2017 at 20:26
  • 2
    I just looked into assembly and NSData.isEqual actually calls NSData.isEqualToData and it's indeed checks lengths before checking memory contents (it does that by calling memcmp). Therefore you can call data1.isEqual(data2) without performance implications.
    – pronebird
    Commented Sep 19, 2017 at 18:54
  • @andy Can you please test the same with logging time stamps and share the data? please try taking screen shots in loop, let say 10 screen shots in a second and log the time stamps with its difference on both scenarios.
    – Anulal S
    Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 4:33
  • Yeah this is unnecessary, trust the internal isEqual implementation to be done efficiently unless you can demonstrate otherwise.
    – trapper
    Commented Feb 27, 2018 at 2:52
2

This method works great:

func isEqualImages(_ image1: UIImage, and image: UIImage) -> Bool {
    let data1: Data? = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image1)
    let data: Data? = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image)
    return data1 == data
}
1

Short-hand and Swifty solution

extension UIImage: Equatable {
    static func ==(lhs: UIImage, rhs: UIImage) -> Bool {
        return lhs.pngData() == rhs.pngData()
    }
}
1

I needed to detect differences within the video feed frames and threshold that difference in order to decide to do something within my code. You can use a similar pixel comparison to look at the pngData of the UIImage.

see my answer here

0

i not sure about comparing the UIImage data as it would be prettry expensive. What you could do is subclass Uimage and add tag property your self and then compare tag before changing the image. assign

-2

if one image name is known to you,it will help you....

CGImageRef cgImage = [imageView.image CGImage];
if (cgImage == [UIImage imageNamed:@"imagename.png"].CGImage) {
   // True Statement
}
1
  • 1
    CGImageRef is a pointer, comparing two pointers does not guarantee equality of the images. UIImage.image(named:) caches images so this may work because you use that method, e.g. you retrieve the same image twice and compare it. But this may break in case of low memory warning.
    – pronebird
    Commented Oct 6, 2017 at 16:07
-2

We need to use isEqualToData method in Objective-C. The Apple document states that

Two data objects are equal if they hold the same number of bytes, and if the bytes at the same position in the objects are the same.

- (BOOL)image:(UIImage *)image1 isEqualTo:(UIImage *)image2
{
    NSData *data1 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image1);
    NSData *data2 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image2);

    return [data1 isEqualToData:data2];
}
-3

Well you can also the 'tag' property to identify the objects at latter stages of your program. Just set the integer value and you are good to go

1
  • 3
    UIImage do not have tag properties. You've must have mistaken the OP with UIImageViews.
    – Jay Q.
    Commented Jul 2, 2015 at 8:13

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