8

How can I escape the input to a MySQL db in Python3? I'm using PyMySQL and works fine, but when I try to do something like:

cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM `Codes` WHERE `ShortCode` =  '{}'".format(request[1]))

it won't work if the string has ' or ". I also tried:

cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM `Codes` WHERE `ShortCode` =  %s",request[1])

The problem with this is that the library (PyMySQL) uses the formatting syntax for Python2.x, %, that doesn't work anymore. I also found this possible solution

conn.escape_string()

in here, but I don't know where to add this code. This is all I got:

import pymysql
import sys
conn = pymysql.connect( host   = "localhost",
            user   = "test",
            passwd = "",
            db     = "test")
cursor = conn.cursor()
cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM `Codes` WHERE `ShortCode` =  {}".format(request[1]))

result = cursor.fetchall()

cursor.close()
conn.close()

Edit: I solved it! In PyMySQL the right way is like this:

import pymysql
import sys
conn = pymysql.connect(host="localhost",
            user="test",
            passwd="",
            db="test")
cursor = conn.cursor()
text = conn.escape(request[1])
cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM `Codes` WHERE `ShortCode` =  {}".format(text))

cursor.close()
conn.close()

Where the text = conn.escape(request[1]) line is what escapes the code. Found it inside PyMySQL code. There, request[1] is the input.

  • 1
    Cool. You should post the second half of your question as an answer, though. You can accept your own answer. – Grilse Jul 7 '12 at 3:24
  • Oops, I didn't see that button before. – user1460016 Jul 7 '12 at 12:48
  • If solved, then flag your own question as accepted. :-) – Jocelyn Jul 7 '12 at 12:53
  • @Jocelyn It tells me "You can accept your own answer in 11 hours", so I'll try later. – user1460016 Jul 8 '12 at 2:15
27

Although the "solved" answer works, it is not best practice. When using a library conforming to the Python DBI, you should be using bind variables rather than formatting a string and passing it to execute. There are dangers inherent in that methodology.

Therefore, this is the right way to do it:

cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM `Codes` WHERE `ShortCode` = %s", text)

Note that this is not a format string but a bind variable passed to the executing cursor.

For details: Python DBI PEP

  • 2
    Note that '%s' should be used even with different types, such as integers. I was trying to use '%d' and got the error: %d format: a number is required, not str. – morsecoder Sep 9 '15 at 18:48
  • Tried using this for batch inserts and it ended up doing it a row at a time. Major pain – Craig Brett Apr 16 at 9:52
3

Solved. In PyMySQL the right way is like this:

import pymysql
import sys
conn = pymysql.connect(host="localhost",
            user="test",
            passwd="",
            db="test")
cursor = conn.cursor()
text = conn.escape(request[1])
cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM `Codes` WHERE `ShortCode` =  {}".format(text))

cursor.close()
conn.close()

Where the text = conn.escape(request[1]) line is what escapes the code. Found it inside PyMySQL code. There, request[1] is the input.

  • 3
    Very bad practice using .format directly - @rootsmith's answer is the right way, as it sanitizes. – kevlarr Jun 13 '18 at 15:52
-1

Ready to use helper function

def mysql_insert(conn, table, row):
    cols = ', '.join('`{}`'.format(col) for col in row.keys())
    vals = ', '.join('%({})s'.format(col) for col in row.keys())
    sql = 'INSERT INTO `{0}` ({1}) VALUES ({2})'.format(table, cols, vals)
    conn.cursor().execute(sql, row)
    conn.commit()

Usage example

insert_into(conn, 'people', {
    'firstname': 'John',
    'lastname': 'Doe',
    'age': 18, })

Reference: https://github.com/PyMySQL/PyMySQL/blob/master/pymysql/cursors.py#L157-L158

def execute(self, query, args=None):

If args is a list or tuple, %s can be used as a placeholder in the query.
If args is a dict, %(name)s can be used as a placeholder in the query.

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