151

I need to implement the following query in SQL Server:

select *
from table1
WHERE  (CM_PLAN_ID,Individual_ID)
IN
(
 Select CM_PLAN_ID, Individual_ID
 From CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS
 Where Lead_Key = :_Lead_Key
)

But the WHERE..IN clause allows only 1 column. How can I compare 2 or more columns with another inner SELECT?

migrated from serverfault.com Jul 16 '09 at 9:18

This question came from our site for system and network administrators.

13 Answers 13

101

You can make a derived table from the subquery, and join table1 to this derived table:

select * from table1 LEFT JOIN 
(
   Select CM_PLAN_ID, Individual_ID
   From CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS
   Where Lead_Key = :_Lead_Key
) table2
ON 
   table1.CM_PLAN_ID=table2.CM_PLAN_ID
   AND table1.Individual=table2.Individual
WHERE table2.CM_PLAN_ID IS NOT NULL
  • 7
    or more generally SELECT * FROM table INNER JOIN otherTable ON ( table.x = otherTable.a AND table.y = otherTable.b) – ala Jul 16 '09 at 7:56
  • 4
    What about the multiple rows that would exist if table 2 is a child of table 1? And why LEFT JOIN? – gbn Jul 16 '09 at 8:18
  • @gbn: Thanks, you're right. Fixed that. – sleske Jul 16 '09 at 8:21
  • 1
    Yeah, INNER JOIN would be more performant here. Doing a LEFT JOIN and filtering the nulls from table 2 is just a verbose way to use an INNER JOIN – Pstr Jul 30 '18 at 16:51
114

You'll want to use the WHERE EXISTS syntax instead.

SELECT *
FROM table1
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT *
              FROM table2
              WHERE Lead_Key = @Lead_Key
                        AND table1.CM_PLAN_ID = table2.CM_PLAN_ID
                        AND table1.Individual_ID = table2.Individual_ID)
  • 5
    While this would work, it converts the uncorrelated query in the question into a correlated query. Unless the query optimizer is clever, this might give you O(n^2) performance :-(. But maybe I'm underestimating the optimizer... – sleske Jul 16 '09 at 7:50
  • 1
    I use syntaxes like this all the time without issue. Unless you are using an older optimizer (6.5, 7, 8, etc) it shouldn't have a problem with this syntax. – mrdenny Jul 16 '09 at 8:09
  • 1
    @sleske: EXISTS is by far better: see my comments in my answer. And test it first,. @mrdenny: I misread your answer at first, I'd use EXISTS too – gbn Jul 16 '09 at 8:17
  • 5
    This is most efficient, +1. See this article in my blog for performance comparison: explainextended.com/2009/06/17/efficient-exists – Quassnoi Jul 16 '09 at 14:46
  • 1
    Even SQL 2000 could handle most correlated subqueries without turning the query into an O(n^2). Might have been a problem back on 6.5. – GilaMonster Jul 17 '09 at 7:02
12

A simple EXISTS clause is cleanest

select *
from table1 t1
WHERE
EXISTS
(
 Select * --or 1. No difference.
 From CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS Ex
 Where Lead_Key = :_Lead_Key
-- correlation here
AND
t1.CM_PLAN_ID = Ex.CM_PLAN_ID AND t1.CM_PLAN_ID =  Ex.Individual_ID
)

If you have multiple rows in the correlation then a JOIN gives multiple rows in the output, so you'd need distinct. Which usually makes the EXISTS more efficient.

Note "SELECT" * with a JOIN would also include columns from the row limiting tables

7
select * from tab1 where (col1,col2) in (select col1,col2 from tab2)

Note:
Oracle ignores rows where one or more of the selected columns is NULL. In these cases you probably want to make use of the NVL-Funktion to map NULL to a special value (that should not be in the values);

select * from tab1
where (col1, NVL(col2, '---') in (select col1, NVL(col2, '---') from tab2)
  • 1
    postgres supports where (colA,colB) in (... some list of tuples...) but I'm not sure what other databases do the same. I'd be interested to know. – Max Murphy Mar 11 '16 at 21:40
  • 2
    This syntax is supported in Oracle and DB2/400 as well (probably DB2, too). Wish SQL Server supported it. – CrazyIvan1974 Mar 17 '16 at 4:08
  • DB2 supports this. – Telmo Marques Jan 23 '17 at 11:04
  • Even SQLite supports it. – Holger Jakobs Jan 30 at 12:13
4

WARNING ABOUT SOLUTIONS:

MANY EXISTING SOLUTIONS WILL GIVE THE WRONG OUTPUT IF ROWS ARE NOT UNIQUE

If you are the only person creating tables, this may not be relevant, but several solutions will give a different number of output rows from the code in question, when one of the tables may not contain unique rows.

WARNING ABOUT PROBLEM STATEMENT:

IN WITH MULTIPLE COLUMNS DOES NOT EXIST, THINK CAREFULLY WHAT YOU WANT

When I see an in with two columns, I can imagine it to mean two things:

  1. The value of column a and column b appear in the other table independently
  2. The values of column a and column b appear in the other table together on the same row

Scenario 1 is fairly trivial, simply use two IN statements.

In line with most existing answers, I hereby provide an overview of mentioned and additional approaches for Scenario 2 (and a brief judgement):

EXISTS (Safe, recommended for SQL Server)

As provided by @mrdenny, EXISTS sounds exactly as what you are looking for, here is his example:

SELECT * FROM T1
WHERE EXISTS
(SELECT * FROM T2 
 WHERE T1.a=T2.a and T1.b=T2.b)

LEFT SEMI JOIN (Safe, recommended for dialects that support it)

This is a very concise way to join, but unfortunately most SQL dialects, including SQL server do not currently suppport it.

SELECT * FROM T1
LEFT SEMI JOIN T2 ON T1.a=T2.a and T1.b=T2.b

Multiple IN statements (Safe, but beware of code duplication)

As mentioned by @cataclysm using two IN statements can do the trick as well, perhaps it will even outperform the other solutions. However, what you should be very carefull with is code duplication. If you ever want to select from a different table, or change the where statement, it is an increased risk that you create inconsistencies in your logic.

Basic solution

SELECT * from T1
WHERE a IN (SELECT a FROM T2 WHERE something)
AND b IN (SELECT b FROM T2 WHERE something)

Solution without code duplication (I believe this does not work in regular SQL Server queries)

WITH mytmp AS (SELECT a, b FROM T2 WHERE something);
SELECT * from T1 
WHERE a IN (SELECT a FROM mytmp)
AND b IN (SELECT b FROM mytmp)

INNER JOIN (technically it can be made safe, but often this is not done)

The reason why I don't recommend using an inner join as a filter, is because in practice people often let duplicates in the right table cause duplicates in the left table. And then to make matters worse, they sometimes make the end result distinct whilst the left table may actually not need to be unique (or not unique in the columns you select). Futhermore it gives you the chance to actually select a column that does not exists in the left table.

SELECT T1.* FROM T1
INNER JOIN 
(SELECT DISTINCT a, b FROM T2) AS T2sub
ON T1.a=T2sub.a AND T1.b=T2sub.b

Most common mistakes:

  1. Joining directly on T2, without a safe subquery. Resulting in the risk of duplication)
  2. SELECT * (Guaranateed to get columns from T2)
  3. SELECT c (Does not guarantee that your column comes and always will come from T1)
  4. No DISTINCT or DISTINCT in the wrong place

CONCATENATION OF COLUMNS WITH SEPARATOR (Not very safe, horrible performance)

The functional problem is that if you use a separator which might occur in a column, it gets tricky to ensure that the outcome is 100% accurate. The technical problem is that this method often incurs type conversions and completely ignores indexes, resulting in possibly horrible performance. Despite these problems, I have to admit that I sometimes still use it for ad-hoc queries on small datasets.

SELECT * FROM T1
WHERE CONCAT(a,"_",b) IN 
(SELECT CONCAT(a,"_",b) FROM T2)

Note that if your columns are numeric, some SQL dialects will require you to cast them to strings first. I believe SQL server will do this automatically.


To wrap things up: As usual there are many ways to do this in SQL, using safe choices will avoid suprises and save you time and headaces in the long run.

2

Why use WHERE EXISTS or DERIVED TABLES when you can just do a normal inner join:

SELECT t.*
FROM table1 t
INNER JOIN CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS s
    ON t.CM_PLAN_ID = s.CM_PLAN_ID
    AND t.Individual_ID = s.Individual_ID
WHERE s.Lead_Key = :_Lead_Key

If the pair of (CM_PLAN_ID, Individual_ID) isn't unique in the status table, you might need a SELECT DISTINCT t.* instead.

  • 3
    And the DISTINCT usually means an EXISTS is more efficient – gbn Jul 16 '09 at 18:39
0
Postgres SQL  : version 9.6
Total records on tables : mjr_agent = 145, mjr_transaction_item = 91800

1.Using with EXISTS [Average Query Time : 1.42s]

SELECT count(txi.id) 
FROM 
mjr_transaction_item txi
WHERE 
EXISTS ( SELECT 1 FROM mjr_agent agnt WHERE agnt.agent_group = 0 AND (txi.src_id = agnt.code OR txi.dest_id = agnt.code) ) 

2.Using with two lines IN Clause [Average Query Time : 0.37s]

SELECT count(txi.id) FROM mjr_transaction_item txi
WHERE 
txi.src_id IN ( SELECT agnt.code FROM mjr_agent agnt WHERE agnt.agent_group = 0 ) 
OR txi.dest_id IN ( SELECT agnt.code FROM mjr_agent agnt WHERE agnt.agent_group = 0 )

3.Using with INNNER JOIN pattern [Average Query Time : 2.9s]

SELECT count(DISTINCT(txi.id)) FROM mjr_transaction_item txi
INNER JOIN mjr_agent agnt ON agnt.code = txi.src_id OR agnt.code = txi.dest_id
WHERE 
agnt.agent_group = 0

So , I choosed second option.

  • Warning for future readers: In line with the question, you will probably want to use AND statements rather than OR statements. – Dennis Jaheruddin Jan 27 at 14:19
  • @DennisJaheruddin .. Thank you for your comment and very nice detail explanations of your answer. You are right , OR statement probably raise duplications. In my case , there hasn't any rows that contains samesrc_id and dest_id in a single row. So, duplications won't happen in my case. – Cataclysm Jan 28 at 2:47
-1

If you want for one table then use following query

SELECT S.* 
FROM Student_info S
  INNER JOIN Student_info UT
    ON S.id = UT.id
    AND S.studentName = UT.studentName
where S.id in (1,2) and S.studentName in ('a','b')

and table data as follow

id|name|adde|city
1   a   ad  ca
2   b   bd  bd
3   a   ad  ad
4   b   bd  bd
5   c   cd  cd

Then output as follow

id|name|adde|city
1   a   ad  ca
2   b   bd  bd
  • id in (1,2) and studentName in ('a','b') is totally not the same as (id, studentName) in ((1,'a'),(2,'b')). Just think of a record having id=2 and name='a'. Of course, if ID is unique, then the effect is diminished, but then, if ID is unique, we don't need to filter over names at all. – quetzalcoatl Mar 21 '18 at 12:39
-1

Query:

select ord_num, agent_code, ord_date, ord_amount
from orders
where (agent_code, ord_amount) IN
(SELECT agent_code, MIN(ord_amount)
FROM orders 
GROUP BY agent_code);

above query worked for me in mysql. refer following link -->

https://www.w3resource.com/sql/subqueries/multiplee-row-column-subqueries.php

-1

Concatenating the columns together in some form is a "hack", but when the product doesn't support semi-joins for more than one column, sometimes you have no choice.

Example of where inner/outer join solution would not work:

select * from T1 
 where <boolean expression>
   and (<boolean expression> OR (ColA, ColB) in (select A, B ...))
   and <boolean expression>
   ...

When the queries aren't trivial in nature sometimes you don't have access to the base table set to perform regular inner/outer joins.

If you do use this "hack", when you combine fields just be sure to add enough of a delimiter in between them to avoid misinterpretations, e.g. ColA + ":-:" + ColB

  • This answer appears to be inconsistent (mentions concatenation and then provides a different example). Also, on a lighter note: We always have a choice ;-) I did add the concatenation example to my overview here, with the relevant footnotes: stackoverflow.com/a/54389589/983722 – Dennis Jaheruddin Jan 27 at 18:41
  • Sorry, the example was what would not work. I edited my text to clarify ... – John K Jan 28 at 20:49
-2

We can simply do this.

   select *
   from 
    table1 t, CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS c
    WHERE  t.CM_PLAN_ID = c.CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS
    and t.Individual_ID = c.Individual_ID
-3

I founded easier this way

Select * 
from table1 
WHERE  (convert(VARCHAR,CM_PLAN_ID) + convert(VARCHAR,Individual_ID)) 
IN 
(
 Select convert(VARCHAR,CM_PLAN_ID) + convert(VARCHAR,Individual_ID)
 From CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS 
 Where Lead_Key = :_Lead_Key 
) 

Hope this help :)

  • 9
    Ouch, no index use here do to the string concat. – mrdenny Feb 3 '11 at 21:38
  • 9
    I've voted this down as it's plain dangerous! If CM_PLAN_ID = 45 and Individual_ID = 3 then concatenation results in 453 - which is indistinguishable from the case where CM_PLAN_ID = 4 and Individual_ID = 53... asking for trouble I would have thought – El Ronnoco Feb 25 '13 at 16:23
  • 5
    ..of course you could concatenate with an arbitrary special char eg 45_3 or 45:3 but it's still not a nice solution and of course as @mrdenny says indexes will not be utilised now that a transform has taken place on the columns. – El Ronnoco Feb 25 '13 at 16:29
  • 1
    I also voted this down, as this solution is really a quick "hack" only. It's slow and as El Ronnoco said, it can lead to bugs. – user872744 Aug 11 '13 at 18:16
-4

Simple and wrong way would be combine two columns using + or concatenate and make one columns.

Select *
from XX
where col1+col2 in (Select col1+col2 from YY)

This would be offcourse pretty slow. Can not be used in programming but if in case you are just querying for verifying something may be used.

  • 9
    Indeed, and it can lead to errors, since e.g. 'ab' + 'c' = 'a'+'bc' – user872744 Aug 11 '13 at 18:17

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