141

Android will kill a process if it is in the background and the OS decides it needs the resources (RAM, CPU, etc.). I need to be able to simulate this behaviour during testing so that I can ensure that my application is behaving correctly. I want to be able to do this in an automated way so that I can test if the application behaves correctly whenever this happens, which means that I'll have to test this in every activity, etc.

I know how to kill my process. That isn't the problem. The problem is that when I kill my process (using DDMS, adb shell kill, Process.killProcess(), etc.) Android does not restart it the same way that it would if the Android OS had killed it itself.

If the Android OS kills the process (due to resource requirements), when the user returns to the application Android will recreate the process and then recreate the top activity on the activity stack (calling onCreate()).

On the other hand, if I kill the process, Android assumes that the activity on the top of the activity stack was badly behaved, so it automatically recreates the process and then removes the top activity from the activity stack and recreates the activity that was underneath the top activity (calling onCreate()`). This is not the behaviour I want. I want the same behaviour as when Android kills the process.

Just to explain pictorially, if my activity stack looks like this:

    ActivityA -> ActivityB -> ActivityC -> ActivityD

If Android kills the process and the user returns to the application, Android recreates the process and creates ActivityD.

If I kill the process, Android recreates the process and creates ActivityC.

14 Answers 14

104

The best way to test this for me was doing this:

  • Open ActivityD in your application
  • Press Home button
  • Press Stop in DDMS on your application (this will kill the app process)
  • Get back to the application with Home long press or opened apps (depends on the device)
  • Application will start in recreated ActivityD (ActivityA, ActivityB, ActivityC are dead and will be recreated when you get back to them)

On some devices you can also get back to application (ActivityD) with Applications -> Your launcher icon but on other devices it will start the ActivityA instead.

This is what Android docs are saying about that:

Normally, the system clears a task (removes all activities from the stack above the root activity) in certain situations when the user re-selects that task from the home screen. Typically, this is done if the user hasn't visited the task for a certain amount of time, such as 30 minutes.

  • 1
    Thanks for your answer but it isn't useful to me because I need an automated way to do this, for automated testing. – David Wasser Sep 9 '13 at 10:26
  • This was really helpful for me. – John Roberts Dec 19 '13 at 1:19
  • 3
    This isn't automated but it worked perfectly for my purposes. It's very important not to skip step 2. You must send the app to the background before stopping the process in DDMS for this to work. For those wondering where the doc quotes came from it's here. Although I'm not sure they're actually related to the topic since it's about the <activity> tag in the manifest. – Tony Chan Apr 24 '14 at 2:23
  • 1
    Exactly what I needed. Thank you. For those that don't know, DDMS is in Eclipse, go to Window -> Open Perspective, and you should find it there. – Richard Jul 13 '14 at 13:43
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    Alternatively you could go to "Development options" and set background limit to "no background processes" then every time you press home the process will die. – Joao Gavazzi Jun 2 '16 at 5:33
41

This seems to work for me:

adb shell am kill <package_name>

This is different to adb shell kill mentioned by the OP.

Note that the help for the am kill command says:

am kill: Kill all processes associated with <PACKAGE>.  Only kills.
  processes that are safe to kill -- that is, will not impact the user
  experience.

So, it won't kill the process if it is in the foreground. This seems to work as the OP wanted in that if I navigate away from my app, then run adb shell am kill <package_name> it will kill the app (I've confirmed this using ps on the device). Then if I return to the app I'm back in the activity I was in previously - i.e. in the OP's example the process gets recreated and creates ActivityD (rather than ActivityC like most other methods of killing seem to trigger).

Sorry I'm a couple of years late for the OP, but hopefully others will find this useful.

  • Thanks! this is what I was looking for! I want to specify that this command behaves differently than adb shell am force-stop. Tha last one will also remove any pendingIntent related to your app (like Notifications) while the first one don't. – bonnyz Mar 11 '15 at 15:32
  • Points to anyone who investigates the OS source code to see what code it runs when it kills a process to reclaim memory - my bet is it's the same code as am kill. – androidguy Jul 26 '17 at 20:10
14

Another method, probably one that is scriptable since it doesn't require DDMS:

One time setup: go to Developer Options, select Background process limit setting, change value from 'Standard Limit' to 'No background processes'.

When you need to restart the process, press the home button. The process will be killed (you can verify in logcat/Android Monitor in studio -- the process will be marked [DEAD]). Then switch back to the app using the task switcher.

  • 1
    Interesting. I think that doesn't effect Foreground Services, right? – IgorGanapolsky Sep 6 '17 at 13:46
  • I need to do this on actual devices running Android as old as 2.3.3, so this isn't any help. – David Wasser Jul 4 '18 at 9:16
9

This question is old but, there is an answer for this question which does not require adb, Android Studio etc. The only requirement is API 23 or newer.

To simulate app restart by OS, go app settings while your app is running, disable (then you can enable) a permission and return the app from recent apps. When permission is disabled, the OS kills the app but keeps saved instance states. When user returns the app, the app and the last activity (with saved state) are recreated.

'No background processes' method sometimes causes same behavior, but not always. For example, if the app is running a background service, "No background processes" does nothing. But the app can be killed by system including its services. Permission method works even if app has a service.

Example:

Our app has two activities. ActivityA is main activity which is started from launcher. ActivityB is started from ActivityA. I will show only onCreate, onStart, onStop, onDestroy methods. Android calls onSaveInstanceState always before calling onStop, because an activity which is on stop state can be killed by system. [https://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Activity.html#ActivityLifecycle]

Permission method:

<start app from launcher first time>
Application onCreate
ActivityA onCreate WITHOUT savedInstance
ActivityA onStart
<open ActivityB>
ActivityB onCreate WITHOUT savedInstance
ActivityB onStart
ActivityA onStop (the order is like this, it is stopped after new one is started)
<go settings>
ActivityB onStop
<disable a permission>
//Application is killed, but onDestroy methods are not called.
//Android does not call onDestroy methods if app will be killed.
<return app by recent apps>
Application onCreate (this is the important part. All static variables are reset.)
ActivityB onCreate WITH savedInstance (user does not notice activity is recreated)
//Note that ActivityA is not created yet, do not try to access it.
ActivityB onStart
<return ActivityA by back>
ActivityA onCreate WITH savedInstance (user does not notice activity is recreated)
ActivityA onStart
ActivityB onStop
ActivityB onDestroy
<press back again, return launcher>
ActivityA onStop
ActivityA onDestroy
<open app again>
//does not call Application onCreate, app was not killed
ActivityA onCreate WITHOUT savedInstance
ActivityA onStart

I want to compare other methods which are mentioned on the other answers.

Do not keep activities: This does not kill application.

<start app from launcher first time>
Application onCreate
ActivityA onCreate WITHOUT savedInstance
ActivityA onStart
<open ActivityB>
ActivityB onCreate WITHOUT savedInstance
ActivityB onStart
ActivityA onStop
ActivityA onDestroy (do not keep)
<return launcher by home button>
ActivityB onStop
ActivityB onDestroy (do not keep) 
<retun app from recent apps>
// NO Application onCreate
ActivityB onCreate WITH savedInstance (user does not notice activity recreated)
ActivityB onStart
<return ActivityA by back>
ActivityA onCreate WITH savedInstance (user does not notice activity recreated)
ActivityA onStart
ActivityB onStop
ActivityB onDestroy
<press back again, return launcher>
ActivityA onStop
ActivityA onDestroy
<open app again>
//does not call Application onCreate, app was not killed
ActivityA onCreate WITHOUT savedInstance
ActivityA onStart

Force stop method: Does not store saved instance states

<start app from launcher first time>
Application onCreate
ActivityA onCreate WITHOUT savedInstance
ActivityA onStart
<open ActivityB>
ActivityB onCreate WITHOUT savedInstance
ActivityB onStart
ActivityA onStop
<go settings>
ActivityB onStop
<force stop, return app from recent apps>
Application onCreate
ActivityA onCreate WITHOUT savedInstance 
//This is important part, app is destroyed by user.
//Root activity of the task is started, not the top activity.
//Also there is no savedInstance.
  • ~"app can be killed by system including its service". Not Foreground Service... – IgorGanapolsky Sep 6 '17 at 13:51
  • @DavidWasser Read the spec! developer.android.com/guide/components/services.html#Foreground A foreground service is a service that the user is actively aware of and is not a candidate for the system to kill when low on memory. – IgorGanapolsky Sep 6 '17 at 15:50
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    @IgorGanapolsky Documentation is nice, especially if it is complete and correct (which it unfortunately isn't), but I usually rely more on actual personal observations. I've seen a foreground Service killed plenty of times. Even if the system is not low on memory. Most device manufacturers have written their own "optimizations" and "improvements" to the Android OS in order to save battery power. Lots of devices have much more agressive "killers" than standard Android. – David Wasser Sep 6 '17 at 16:30
  • @DavidWasser Fair observation. So after all these years, did you come up with a solution? – IgorGanapolsky Sep 6 '17 at 16:42
  • @IgorGanapolsky No. I've found no solution to this problem. That's why the question is still open. – David Wasser Sep 6 '17 at 16:48
5

In the Developer options under Settings, select 'Do not keep activities', which will destroy activities as soon as you navigate away from them.

  • This is effectively the same as the solution already posted - and rejected - a year ago. The only difference seems to be the application used to set it on an emulator, vs the more recent phones that support it. – Chris Stratton May 3 '13 at 21:18
  • Sorry, as Chris Stratton says, this is pretty much the same suggestion as the other answer. This isn't about Android finishing activities. This is about Android killing the whole process (which it does, pretty regularly and effectively, especially on HTC devices running Android 4.x). – David Wasser May 4 '13 at 11:47
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    This one is almost good but it will not kill the process, it only destroys the activity. What does it mean? Your activity will be opened with savedInstanceState but all static variables are still in the process. After process kill all static variables are also cleared. – Mark Sep 9 '13 at 10:17
5

This is how you do it in Android Studio.

  1. Have your device in Debug Mode connected to your computer.
  2. Open the app on your device and go to whichever activity you want to test the "Return to it from the dead".
  3. Press Home button on your device.
  4. In Android Studio go to Android Monitor -> Monitors and press the Terminate Application icon.
  5. Now you can either go back to your app through the recent apps or by clicking on it's launcher icon, behaviour has been the same in my tests.
  • 1
    This isn't any help. I need to do this programatically, within a test suite. But thanks anyway. – David Wasser Feb 1 '17 at 9:12
  • Also, this answer is pretty much the same as the answer from Mark. – David Wasser Feb 1 '17 at 9:13
  • Any idea how to do this via UIAutomator or Espresso? – IgorGanapolsky Sep 6 '17 at 13:54
  • I can't find Android Monitor - Monitors. Must be something they got rid of. I'm on v 3.2.1 – Dale Jan 2 at 0:22
4

I'm very late to the party and several before me gave the same correct answer but to simplify for whoever comes after me just press home button and run this command:

adb shell ps | grep <package name> | awk '{print $2}' | xargs adb shell run-as <package name again> kill

The app won't lose state and from my own experience this works the same way as the OS killed the app in the background. This works only for debug built applications

  • I get 'grep' is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file. – Dale Jan 2 at 0:23
  • But I did it while in the shell run-as <package name> kill 7379, but it put me at the previous activity, not the activity I was at when I pressed the home button. – Dale Jan 2 at 0:30
2

You can do next steps to reproduce sought-for behaviour:

  1. Open your app, navigate to top activity
  2. Use notification panel to navigate to any another full-screen application (for example, to system settings - in right top corner)
  3. Kill your application process
  4. Press back button
  • 1
    Thanks for your answer but it isn't useful to me because I need an automated way to do this, for automated testing. – David Wasser Feb 7 '14 at 12:01
  • So, this is the only method which I found would actually simulate Android clearing memory and killing your app (my API level is 19, and so I can't use the send-trim-memory command). Other commands such as adb shell am force-stop com.my.app.package or kill, won't reproduce the same exact process which following the procedure above will! – Mark Garcia Dec 20 '18 at 23:22
1

Press the Home button and put the app in the background first. Then stop or kill the process from DDMS or ADB.

  • Thanks for your answer but it isn't useful to me because I need an automated way to do this, for automated testing. – David Wasser Feb 7 '14 at 12:00
  • Android will never kill your process if your activity is currently in the foreground. You're trying to test a condition that will never occur. If your activity is in the background, then its state has already been saved and there is no difference between you killing it manually and Android killing it under low memory i.e. the process is just killed; there is nothing special about a low memory kill. When memory is available again your sticky services will be restarted (except on 4.4) and when you tap the icon or recent task, the stack and activity state will be restored. – Monstieur Feb 7 '14 at 12:05
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    In your example, it's going back to Activity C because you killed the process while Activity D was visible on the screen (this will never occur even under low memory) and Activity C's state was saved since it's in the background. Your process will only be killed if it's not in the foreground at all i.e. Activity D's state would have been saved when it went to the background and thus will be restored even if your process is killed. In order to perform your tests on each activity, you HAVE to send the app to the background first before you kill it. – Monstieur Feb 7 '14 at 12:11
  • What did you mean by ~"and put the app in the background first"? – IgorGanapolsky Sep 6 '17 at 14:00
0

It seems you want to test onSaveInstanceState and onRestoreInstanceState.

Testing on real device: take a look at SetAlwaysFinish app.

Testing in emulator: checkout Immediately destroy activities option in Dev Tools App in Android emulator.

  • 11
    I'm not looking for ways to test onSaveInstanceState and onRestoreInstanceState. I need to be able to test my application when Android kills and recreates the entire process, thereby recreating the activities on the activity stack in the wrong sequence. Destroying an activity is not the same as killing the process. For example, if the activity has any static variables, there will be reset on a process kill/restart, but left alone on an activity finish()/onDestroy(). These tools you mentioned are, of course, also useful, but not for the particular scenario I have here. But Thanks! – David Wasser Jul 7 '12 at 8:42
  • OK. Got it. Maybe ulimit builtin (shell) command could be useful in that case (especially with -Svoptions). See more details here. Note that I was able to set memory limit on my Galaxy Nexus, but in Emulator I got 'unknown -v option' error. However, I don't know how to start Android app so that it will act as shell subprocess (so that app counts into memory limit). That's why I'm not posting this as answer. – vArDo Jul 7 '12 at 20:14
  • I need to test this on a real phone anyway, so emulator-based suggestions aren't useful. Thanks for the tip, I'll have to look at that. – David Wasser Jul 8 '12 at 9:19
  • SetAlwaysFinish link redirects. I believe you were looking for this bricolsoftconsulting.com/… – Mike Speed May 3 '13 at 19:34
  • @billynomates Thx for pointing it out. Fixed the link. – vArDo May 6 '13 at 9:54
0

The root of your problem seems to be that your Activity is in foreground when you kill the process.

You can observe this by pressing stop in DDMS when Activity is visible (happens exactly what you describe) and comparing that to pressing stop after home and later returning to the app.

Just make sure to moveTaskToBack(true) somehow in your tests.

0

I'm not sure this is the answer you are looking for, it's more like a logic think.

I don't think that you can really make a fully automated test, the only way to simulate it, it will be to recreate it, AKA have so many activities that Android will kill your application.

So my idea or suggestion is to make another small app, which keeps popping up new activities, till Android runs out of memory and start killing process it the background.

Something among the line:

Start activity i -> Check running process if the app is in the list, increment i and restart the loop without closing current activity, else -> decrease i and close current activity, go back to previous and recheck...

0

You can also connect to your device/emulator from terminal with adb shell, then get PID of your process with ps | grep <your_package_name and execute kill -9 <pid>. Then open your minimized app from recent apps picker and it will restart last activity

  • Is that the same as Android killing a process under low-memory conditions? I think OP specifically wanted that... – IgorGanapolsky Sep 6 '17 at 14:01
  • 1
    @IgorGanapolsky theoretically is, though you couldn't do that on an actual device if it is not rooted. – Fran Marzoa Oct 9 '17 at 19:09
0

Put the application in background with HOME button

Select your process in "Logcat" mode in Android Studio, then click Terminate Application in the bottomleft corner

Now launch your app from launcher on Android device

  • This is a duplicate answer – Onik Jul 3 '18 at 16:11
  • @Onik All the other ones have a bunch of unnecessary fluff like ddms and whatever. Though technically yeah, stackoverflow.com/a/41975750/2413303 says the same thing. Maybe I should add pictures. – EpicPandaForce Jul 3 '18 at 16:42
  • This isn't helpful. I have a test harness and I cannot execute these actions from the test harness. Also, the behaviour is not the same as what happens when Android kills the process. – David Wasser Jul 4 '18 at 9:14
  • the behaviour is not the same as what happens when Android kills the process yes it is – EpicPandaForce Jul 4 '18 at 9:21
  • This process shows me the previous activity, not the activity of when the home button is pressed. – Dale Jan 2 at 0:08

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