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I have some observed data by hour. I am trying to subset this data by the day or even week intervals. I am not sure how to proceed with this task in R.

The sample of the data is below.

date                                 obs
2011-10-24 01:00:00                  12
2011-10-24 02:00:00                  4
2011-10-24 19:00:00                  18
2011-10-24 20:00:00                  7
2011-10-24 21:00:00                  4
2011-10-24 22:00:00                  2
2011-10-25 00:00:00                  4
2011-10-25 01:00:00                  2
2011-10-25 02:00:00                  2
2011-10-25 15:00:00                  12
2011-10-25 18:00:00                  2
2011-10-25 19:00:00                  3
2011-10-25 21:00:00                  2
2011-10-25 23:00:00                  9
2011-10-26 00:00:00                  13
2011-10-26 01:00:00                  11
  • Can you provide an example of what you're trying to do? "Subset by day or week intervals" could be interpreted a couple different ways. – Joshua Ulrich Jul 6 '12 at 20:31
  • I am trying to get a subset of the data (not aggregate) based on the time constraints. – notrockstar Jul 6 '12 at 20:38
  • Yes, I realize you're trying to get a subset, but do you want to subset by calendar week, a week from a specific point in time, etc.? – Joshua Ulrich Jul 6 '12 at 20:45
  • Sorry, I should be more clear. I want a partition by calendar week. – notrockstar Jul 6 '12 at 20:49
1

First I entered the data with the multiple spaces replaced with tabs.

dat$date <- as.POSIXct(dat$date, format="%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S")
split(dat , as.POSIXlt(dat$date)$yday)
# Notice these are not the same functions
#---------------------
$`296`
                 date obs
1 2011-10-24 01:00:00  12
2 2011-10-24 02:00:00   4
3 2011-10-24 19:00:00  18
4 2011-10-24 20:00:00   7
5 2011-10-24 21:00:00   4
6 2011-10-24 22:00:00   2

$`297`
                  date obs
7  2011-10-25 00:00:00   4
8  2011-10-25 01:00:00   2
9  2011-10-25 02:00:00   2
10 2011-10-25 15:00:00  12
11 2011-10-25 18:00:00   2
12 2011-10-25 19:00:00   3
13 2011-10-25 21:00:00   2
14 2011-10-25 23:00:00   9

$`298`
                  date obs
15 2011-10-26 00:00:00  13
16 2011-10-26 01:00:00  11

The POSIXlt class does not work well inside dataframes but it can ve very handy for creating time based groups. It's a list structure with these indices: 'yday', 'wday', 'year', 'mon', 'mday', 'hour', 'min', 'sec' and 'isdt'. The cut.POSIXt function adds divisions at other natural boundaries; E.g.

?cut.POSIXt
  split(dat , cut(dat$date, "week") )

If you wanted to sum within date:

tapply(dat$obs, as.POSIXlt(dat$date)$yday, sum)
#-------
296 297 298 
 47  36  24 
  • Thank you, @DWin. How would you do it by weekly? – notrockstar Jul 6 '12 at 20:39
  • Any solutions for data frames? – notrockstar Jul 6 '12 at 20:40
  • To the first question use cut(dat$date, breaks="week"). To the second question .... huh? .... that is a dataframe. – 42- Jul 6 '12 at 20:44
  • my second question was regarding the sentence about POSIXit not working well inside dataframes. – notrockstar Jul 6 '12 at 20:47
  • I was only advising not to use POSIXlt as the class for the contents of dataframes. You can certainly use POSIXct to POSIXlt as an output strategy. That's really what it is for. – 42- Jul 6 '12 at 20:50
2

I'd use a time series class such as xts

dat <- read.table(text="2011-10-24 01:00:00                  12
2011-10-24 02:00:00                  4
2011-10-24 19:00:00                  18
2011-10-24 20:00:00                  7
2011-10-24 21:00:00                  4
2011-10-24 22:00:00                  2
2011-10-25 00:00:00                  4
2011-10-25 01:00:00                  2
2011-10-25 02:00:00                  2
2011-10-25 15:00:00                  12
2011-10-25 18:00:00                  2
2011-10-25 19:00:00                  3
2011-10-25 21:00:00                  2
2011-10-25 23:00:00                  9
2011-10-26 00:00:00                  13
2011-10-26 01:00:00                  11", header=FALSE, stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

xobj <- xts(dat[, 3], as.POSIXct(paste(dat[, 1], dat[, 2])))

xts subsetting is very intuitive. For all data on "2011-10-25", do this

xobj["2011-10-25"]
#                    [,1]
#2011-10-25 00:00:00    4
#2011-10-25 01:00:00    2
#2011-10-25 02:00:00    2
#2011-10-25 15:00:00   12
#2011-10-25 18:00:00    2
#2011-10-25 19:00:00    3
#2011-10-25 21:00:00    2
#2011-10-25 23:00:00    9

You can also subset out time spans like this (all data between and including 2011-10-24 and 2011-10-25)

xobj["2011-10-24/2011-10-25"]

Or, if you want all data from October 2011,

xobj["2011-10"]

If you want to get all data from any day that is between 19:00 and 20:00,

xobj['T19:00:00/T20:00:00']
#                    [,1]
#2011-10-24 19:00:00   18
#2011-10-24 20:00:00    7
#2011-10-25 19:00:00    3

You can use the endpoints function to find the rows that are the last rows of a time period ("hours", "days", "weeks", etc.)

endpoints(xobj, "days")
[1]  0  6 14 16    

Or you can convert to a lower frequency

to.weekly(xobj)
#           xobj.Open xobj.High xobj.Low xobj.Close
#2011-10-26        12        18        2         11
to.daily(xobj)
#           xobj.Open xobj.High xobj.Low xobj.Close
#2011-10-25        12        18        2          2
#2011-10-26         4        12        2          9
#2011-10-26        13        13       11         11

Notice that the above creates columns for Open, High, Low, and Close. If you only want the data at the endpoints, you can use OHLC=FALSE

to.daily(xobj, OHLC=FALSE)
#           [,1]
#2011-10-25    2
#2011-10-26    9
#2011-10-26   11

For more basic subsetting, and much more, visit http://www.quantmod.com/examples/

As @JoshuaUlrich mentions in the comments, split.xts is INCREDIBLY useful.

You can split by day (or week, or month, etc), apply a function, then recombine

split(xobj, 'days') #create a list where each element is the data for a different day
#[[1]]
#                    [,1]
#2011-10-24 01:00:00   12
#2011-10-24 02:00:00    4
#2011-10-24 19:00:00   18
#2011-10-24 20:00:00    7
#2011-10-24 21:00:00    4
#2011-10-24 22:00:00    2
#
#[[2]]
#                    [,1]
#2011-10-25 00:00:00    4
#2011-10-25 01:00:00    2
#2011-10-25 02:00:00    2
#2011-10-25 15:00:00   12
#2011-10-25 18:00:00    2
#2011-10-25 19:00:00    3
#2011-10-25 21:00:00    2
#2011-10-25 23:00:00    9
#
#[[3]]
#                    [,1]
#2011-10-26 00:00:00   13
#2011-10-26 01:00:00   11

Suppose you want only the first value of each day. split by day, lapply the first function and rbind back together.

do.call(rbind, lapply(split(xobj, 'days'), first))
#                    [,1]
#2011-10-24 01:00:00   12
#2011-10-25 00:00:00    4
#2011-10-26 00:00:00   13
  • 1
    Don't forget split.xts: split(xobj, "days"). – Joshua Ulrich Jul 6 '12 at 20:43
  • @GSee, thank you! For some reason running: xobj <- xts(dat[, 3], as.POSIXct(paste(dat[, 1], dat[, 2]))) gives me an error : order.by requires an appropriate time-based object. Any advice? – notrockstar Jul 6 '12 at 20:55
  • The first argument to the function xts should be the data, and the second argument should be the time index. If you copy and paste the entire first block of code in my answer, it should work (and does for me) because the first 2 columns are date and time, and the 3rd column is the data. The vignettes in the zoo and xts packages will help you figure out how to turn your data into xts. Or, if you provide the dput of your data, I'll update my answer for your specific data. – GSee Jul 6 '12 at 21:03

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