44

I'm having a strange problem positioning a set of divs inside another div. I think it will be best to describe it with an image:

image

Inside the black (#box) div there are two divs (.a, .b) that have to positioned in the same place. What I'm trying to achieve is pictured in the first image, second one is the effect I get. It looks like if the divs were floated without clearing or something, which is obviously not the case. Any ideas would be welcome!

Here's the code for this sample:

CSS:

#box {
    background-color: #000;
    position: relative;
    padding: 10px;
    width: 220px;
}

.a {
    width: 210px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 10px;
    left: 10px;
    background-color: #fff;
    padding: 5px;
}

.b {
    width: 210px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 10px;
    left: 10px;
    background-color: red;
    padding: 5px;
}

#after {
    background-color: yellow;
    padding: 10px;
    width: 220px;
}

HTML:

    <div id="box">
        <div class="a">Lorem</div>
        <div class="b">Lorem</div>
    </div>

    <div id="after">Hello world</div>
5
  • Which jQuery pluging are you using? Does it take options that would allow you to overwrite it's absolute positioning? Could you edit the plugin code to change how it works?
    – Sam Hasler
    Jul 16, 2009 at 13:48
  • I'm using jQuery Cycle Lite (malsup.com/jquery/cycle/lite) - I could edit the code, just need to make sure it will still work ;)
    – Justine
    Jul 16, 2009 at 13:53
  • 9
    The image is a dud. Returns 404. This post may have been answered, but for the sake of helping others in the future, you should leave it available or alternatively describe it in words. Sep 5, 2012 at 16:02
  • 2
    for image : goo.gl/9FbqEZ Mar 5, 2014 at 6:01
  • @niraj.nijju...now the link si broken Aug 7, 2021 at 0:35

4 Answers 4

58
  1. First all block level elements are postioned static to the 'document'. The default positioning for all elements is position: static, which means the element is not positioned and occurs where it normally would in the document. Normally you wouldn't specify this unless you needed to override a positioning that had been previously set.
  2. Relative position: If you specify position: relative, then you can use top or bottom, and left or right to move the element relative to where it would normally occur in the document.
  3. When you specify position: absolute, the element is removed from the document and placed exactly where you tell it to go.

So in regard to your question you should position the containing block relative, i.e:

#parent {
  position: relative;
}

And the child element you should position absolute to the parent element like this:

#child {
  position: absolute;
}

See: Learn CSS Positioning in Ten Steps

2
37

The absolute divs are taken out of the flow of the document so the containing div does not have any content except for the padding. Give #box a height to fill it out.

#box {
    background-color: #000;
    position: relative;
    padding: 10px;
    width: 220px;
    height:30px;
}
3
  • Thanks for the tip. The problem with the height is that it doesn't push the "after" div down, just covers it.
    – Justine
    Jul 16, 2009 at 13:38
  • It should. See here: ejgejg.com/test/abs.html Are there any other styles applied to after?
    – Emily
    Jul 16, 2009 at 13:47
  • This is what I'd call a dirty hack. I believe that @RichieHindle's answer is the one to go with: parent block "position: relative", inner block "position:absolute". Works just fine. Feb 4, 2013 at 0:33
8

One of #a or #b needs to be not position:absolute, so that #box will grow to accommodate it.

So you can stop #a from being position:absolute, and still position #b over the top of it, like this:

 #box {
        background-color: #000;
        position: relative;     
        padding: 10px;
        width: 220px;
    }
    
    .a {
        width: 210px;
        background-color: #fff;
        padding: 5px;
    }
    
    .b {
        width: 100px; /* So you can see the other one */
        position: absolute;
        top: 10px; left: 10px;
        background-color: red;
        padding: 5px;
    }
    
    #after {
        background-color: yellow;
        padding: 10px;
        width: 220px;
    }
    <div id="box">
        <div class="a">Lorem</div>
        <div class="b">Lorem</div>
    </div>
    <div id="after">Hello world</div>

(Note that I've made the widths different, so you can see one behind the other.)

Edit after Justine's comment: Then your only option is to specify the height of #box. This:

#box {
    /* ... */
    height: 30px;
}

works perfectly, assuming the heights of a and b are fixed. Note that you'll need to put IE into standards mode by adding a doctype at the top of your HTML

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN"
          "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">

before that works properly.

3
  • Thanks you. But like I said in the comment to Tim's answer, I'm using a jQuery plugin that will make a and b absolute positioned, so can't make them not positioned.
    – Justine
    Jul 16, 2009 at 13:41
  • Yes, I ended up adding height to the #box. Thanks!
    – Justine
    Jul 16, 2009 at 15:22
  • What is the point of this answer if you need to manually set the height of the containing div? What if your children have an arbitrary height?
    – Steve
    Nov 7, 2015 at 9:43
7

The problem is described (among other) in this article.

#box is relatively positioned, which makes it part of the "flow" of the page. Your other divs are absolutely positioned, so they are removed from the page's "flow".

Page flow means that the positioning of an element effects other elements in the flow.

In other words, as #box now sees the dom, .a and .b are no longer "inside" #box.

To fix this, you would want to make everything relative, or everything absolute.

One way would be:

.a {
   position:relative;
   margin-top:10px;
   margin-left:10px;
   background-color:red;
   width:210px;
   padding: 5px;
}
3
  • Thanks, but thing is, it's not my choice to use this positioning. I'm using a jQuery plugin that will make a and b absolute positioned.
    – Justine
    Jul 16, 2009 at 13:40
  • can you make #box absolutely positioned? also, jquery could change the css of those items after your plugin runs. Jul 16, 2009 at 14:34
  • @TimHoolihan If you put an absolutely positioned element inside a relatively positioned element with an appropriate size, it will sit in it perfectly! look at Emily's answer.
    – GingerHead
    Apr 17, 2012 at 11:24

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