7

So I was writing a rock paper scissors game when I came to writing this function:

a is player one's move, b is player two's move. All I need to figure out is if player one won, lost, or tied.

//rock=0, paper=1, scissors=2
processMove(a, b) {
    if(a == b) ties++;
    else {
             if(a==0 && b==2) wins++;
        else if(a==0 && b==1) losses++;
        else if(a==1 && b==2) losses++;
        else if(a==1 && b==0) wins++;
        else if(a==2 && b==1) wins++;
        else if(a==2 && b==0) losses++;
    }
}

My question is: What's the most elegant way this function can be written?

Edit: I'm looking for a one-liner.

2
  • 2
    Looking for readable correct code is much better than looking for one-liners.
    – Chris A.
    Jul 7, 2012 at 17:43
  • 1
    Have a look at my answer to a similar question: stackoverflow.com/a/9553712/1207152
    – sch
    Jul 7, 2012 at 17:59

6 Answers 6

18
if (a == b) ties++;
else if ((a - b) % 3 == 1) wins++;
else losses++;

I need to know exactly which language you are using to turn it into a strictly one-liner...

For JavaScript (or other languages with strange Modulus) use:

if (a == b) ties++;
else if ((a - b + 3) % 3 == 1) wins++;
else losses++;
4
  • 1
    rock vs scissors doesn't work: (0 - 2 % 3) = -2. Using javascript
    – Farzher
    Jul 7, 2012 at 17:54
  • 4
    Looks like it's missing a pair of parenthesis: ((a-b) % 3 == 1). In C operators modulo is higher in order of operations than subtraction.
    – Tim
    Jul 7, 2012 at 18:01
  • It's not a strange modulus its: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… > While in most languages, % is a remainder operator, in some (e.g. Python, Perl) it is a modulo operator. For two values of the same sign, the two are equivalent, but when the operands are of different signs, the modulo result always has the same sign as the divisor, while the remainder has the same sign as the dividend, which can make them differ by one unit of the divisor.
    – spex
    Dec 2, 2022 at 7:26
  • For languages where % is a remainder operator, use ((n % d) + d) % d or in this case (((a - b) % 3) + 3) % 3
    – spex
    Dec 2, 2022 at 8:32
8

A 3x3 matrix would be "more elegant", I suppose.

char result = "TWLLTWWLT".charAt(a * 3 + b);

(Edited: Forgot that a and b were already zero-origin.)

2

I suppose you could use the terniary operator like this -

if (b==0) a==1? wins++ : loss++;

if (b==1) a==1? loss++ : wins++;

if (b==2) a==1? loss++ : wins++;
2

You can do it with a simple mathematical formula to get the result and then compare with if like this:

var moves = {
  'rock': 0, 
  'paper': 1,
  'scissors': 2
};
var result = {
  'wins': 0,
  'losses': 0,
  'ties': 0
};
var processMove = function (a, b) {
  var processResult = (3 + b - a) % 3;
  if (!processResult) {
    ++result['ties'];
  } else if(1 == processResult) {
    ++result['losses'];
  } else {
    ++result['wins'];
  }
  return result;
};

jsFiddle Demo


One line processMove function without return:

var processMove = function (a, b) {
  ((3 + b - a) % 3) ? 1 == ((3 + b - a) % 3) ? ++result.losses : ++result.wins : ++result.ties;
};
1

how do you do it in java?

result = (comp - x ) % 3 ;

System.out.println (result);
 if (result == 0 )// if the game is tie
 {
     System.out.println ("A Tie!") ;
 }

 else if (result == 1 || result == 2 )
 {
    //System.out.println (user + " " +   "beats" + " " + computer_choice + " you win" );
     System.out.println ("comp win");
 }

 else
 {
     System.out.println ("you win");
    //System.out.println (computer_choice  + " " +  "beats" + " " + user + "you lose");
 }
-1

Maybe this will come in handy someone (JavaScript):

if (a == b) ties++;
else if ((a - b) == 1 || (b - a) == 2) losses++;
else wins++;

PHP:

function check($a, $b) {
    if ($a == $b) {
        return "Tie";
    }
    if (($a - $b) == 1 || ($b - $a) == 2) {
        return "You Lose";
    } else 
        return "You Win";
}

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