16

Let's say I have the continuous range of integers [0, 1, 2, 4, 6], in which the 3 is the first "missing" number. I need an algorithm to find this first "hole". Since the range is very large (containing perhaps 2^32 entries), efficiency is important. The range of numbers is stored on disk; space efficiency is also a main concern.

What's the best time and space efficient algorithm?

15 Answers 15

40

Use binary search. If a range of numbers has no hole, then the difference between the end and start of the range will also be the number of entries in the range.

You can therefore begin with the entire list of numbers, and chop off either the first or second half based on whether the first half has a gap. Eventually you will come to a range with two entries with a hole in the middle.

The time complexity of this is O(log N). Contrast to a linear scan, whose worst case is O(N).

  • This works in the case where there's only 1 missing number, but does it generalise? – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 8 '12 at 19:18
  • 5
    Sure; if l[end] - l[start] is not equal to end - start, then the difference is the number of gaps. By using "does the first half contain a gap" as the predicate you binary search on, you will narrow in on only the first one. – phs Jul 8 '12 at 19:31
  • Yes, you're right! +1 then. – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 8 '12 at 19:34
5

Based on the approach suggested by @phs above, here is the C code to do that:

#include <stdio.h>

int find_missing_number(int arr[], int len) {
    int first, middle, last;
    first = 0;
    last = len - 1;
    middle = (first + last)/2;

    while (first < last) {
        if ((arr[middle] - arr[first]) != (middle - first)) {
            /* there is a hole in the first half */
            if ((middle - first) == 1 && (arr[middle] - arr[first] > 1)) {
                return (arr[middle] - 1);
            }

            last = middle;
        } else if ((arr[last] - arr[middle]) != (last - middle)) {
            /* there is a hole in the second half */
            if ((last - middle) == 1 && (arr[last] - arr[middle] > 1)) {
                return (arr[middle] + 1);
            }

            first = middle;
        } else {
            /* there is no hole */
            return -1;
        }

        middle = (first + last)/2;
    }

    /* there is no hole */
    return -1;
}

int main() {
    int arr[] = {3, 5, 1};
    printf("%d", find_missing_number(arr, sizeof arr/(sizeof arr[0]))); /* prints 4 */
    return 0;
}
3

Based on algorithm provided by @phs

int findFirstMissing(int array[], int start , int end){

    if(end<=start+1){
        return start+1;
    }
    else{

        int mid = start + (end-start)/2;

        if((array[mid] - array[start]) != (mid-start))
            return findFirstMissing(array, start, mid);
        else
            return findFirstMissing(array, mid+1, end);

    }
}
  • If you use as input {1,2,3} it does not return 4 – Sergio Bilello Jan 20 '17 at 22:09
3

Below is my solution, which I believe is simple and avoids an excess number of confusing if-statements. It also works when you don't start at 0 or have negative numbers involved! The complexity is O(lg(n)) time with O(1) space, assuming the client owns the array of numbers (otherwise it's O(n)).


The Algorithm in C Code

int missingNumber(int a[], int size) {
    int lo = 0;
    int hi = size - 1; 

    // TODO: Use this if we need to ensure we start at 0!
    //if(a[0] != 0) { return 0; }

    // All elements present? If so, return next largest number.
    if((hi-lo) == (a[hi]-a[lo])) { return a[hi]+1; }

    // While 2 or more elements to left to consider...
    while((hi-lo) >= 2) { 
        int mid = (lo + hi) / 2;
        if((mid-lo) != (a[mid]-a[lo])) {  // Explore left-hand side
            hi = mid;
        } else {  // Explore right hand side
            lo = mid + 1;
        }
    }

    // Return missing value from the two candidates remaining...
    return (lo == (a[lo]-a[0])) ? hi + a[0] : lo + a[0];
}

Test Outputs

    int a[] = {0};  // Returns: 1
    int a[] = {1};  // Returns: 2

    int a[] = {0, 1};  // Returns: 2
    int a[] = {1, 2};  // Returns: 3
    int a[] = {0, 2};  // Returns: 1

    int a[] = {0, 2, 3, 4};  // Returns: 1
    int a[] = {0, 1, 2, 4};  // Returns: 3

    int a[] = {0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};  // Returns: 3
    int a[] = {2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};        // Returns: 4
    int a[] = {2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9};        // Returns: 7

    int a[] = {-3, -2, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};      // Returns: -1
    int a[] = {-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};  // Returns: 10

The general procedure is:

  1. (Optional) Check if the array starts at 0. If it doesn't, return 0 as missing.
  2. Check if the array of integers is complete with no missing integer. If it is not missing an integer, return the next largest integer.
  3. In a binary search fashion, check for a mismatch between the difference in the indices and array values. A mismatch tells us which half a missing element is in. If there is a mismatch in the first half, move left, otherwise move right. Do this until you have two candidate elements left to consider.
  4. Return the number that is missing based on incorrect candidate.

Note, the algorithm's assumptions are:

  1. First and last elements are considered to never be missing. These elements establish a range.
  2. Only one integer is ever missing in the array. This will not find more than one missing integer!
  3. Integer in the array are expected to increase in steps of 1, not at any other rate.
  • This is perfect but I don't think it works with duplicates (in an ordered array). Try {0,0,0,1,2,3,4,5} it should return 6 , but it returns 1. – Marin Sep 4 at 12:41
  • 1
    @Marin - In that case your best bet is to just iterate through all of the numbers to find the hole in O(n) time. Duplicates break the assumption this algorithm relies on, and changes the nature of the problem mentioned in the question. – Akyidrian Sep 6 at 5:19
3

Since numbers from 0 to n - 1 are sorted in an array, the first numbers should be same as their indexes. That's to say, the number 0 is located at the cell with index 0, the number 1 is located at the cell with index 1, and so on. If the missing number is denoted as m. Numbers less then m are located at cells with indexes same as values.

The number m + 1 is located at a cell with index m, The number m + 2 is located at a cell with index m + 1, and so on. We can see that, the missing number m is the first cell whose value is not identical to its value.

Therefore, it is required to search in an array to find the first cell whose value is not identical to its value. Since the array is sorted, we could find it in O(lg n) time based on the binary search algorithm as implemented below:

int getOnceNumber_sorted(int[] numbers)
{
    int length = numbers.length
    int left = 0;
    int right = length - 1;
    while(left <= right)
    {
        int middle = (right + left) >> 1;
        if(numbers[middle] != middle)
        {
            if(middle == 0 || numbers[middle - 1] == middle - 1)
                return middle;
            right = middle - 1;
        }
        else
            left = middle + 1;
    }


    return -1;
}

This solution is borrowed from my blog: http://codercareer.blogspot.com/2013/02/no-37-missing-number-in-array.html.

1

Have you considered a run-length encoding? That is, you encode the first number as well as the count of numbers that follow it consecutively. Not only can you represent the numbers used very efficiently this way, the first hole will be at the end of the first run-length encoded segment.

To illustrate with your example:

[0, 1, 2, 4, 6]

Would be encoded as:

[0:3, 4:1, 6:1]

Where x:y means there is a set of numbers consecutively starting at x for y numbers in a row. This tells us immediately that the first gap is at location 3. Note, however, that this will be much more efficient when the assigned addresses are clustered together, not randomly dispersed throughout the range.

0

if the list is sorted, I'd iterate over the list and do something like this Python code:

missing = []
check = 0
for n in numbers:
    if n > check:
        # all the numbers in [check, n) were not present
        missing += range(check, n)
    check = n + 1

# now we account for any missing numbers after the last element of numbers
if check < MAX:
    missing += range(check, MAX + 1)

if lots of numbers are missing, you might want to use @Nathan's run-length encoding suggestion for the missing list.

0
Array: [1,2,3,4,5,6,8,9]
Index: [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7]


int findMissingEmementIndex(int a[], int start, int end)
{
    int mid = (start + end)/2;

    if( Math.abs(a[mid] - a[start]) != Math.abs(mid - start) ){

        if(  Math.abs(mid - start) == 1 && Math.abs(a[mid] - a[start])!=1 ){
            return start +1; 
        }
        else{
            return findMissingElmementIndex(a,start,mid);
        }

    }
    else if( a[mid] - a[end] != end - start){

        if(  Math.abs(end - mid) ==1 && Math.abs(a[end] - a[mid])!=1 ){
           return mid +1; 
        }
        else{
            return findMissingElmementIndex(a,mid,end);
        }
    }
    else{
        return No_Problem;
    }
}
0

This is an interview Question. We will have an array of more than one missing numbers and we will put all those missing numbers in an ArrayList.

public class Test4 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] a = { 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 };
        List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<>();

        int start = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
            int ch = a[i];
            if (start == ch) {
                start++;
            } else {
                list.add(start);
                start++;
                i--; // a must do.
            } // else
        } // for
        System.out.println(list);

    }

}
0

Functional Programming solution (Scala)

  • Nice and elegant
  • Lazy evaluation

    def gapFinder(sortedList: List[Int], start: Int = 0): Int = {
      def withGuards: Stream[Int] =
        (start - 1) +: sortedList.toStream :+ (sortedList.last + 2)
    
      if (sortedList.isEmpty) start
      else withGuards.sliding(2)
      .dropWhile { p => p.head + 1 >= p.last }.next()
      .headOption.getOrElse(start) + 1
    } // 8-line solution
    
    // Tests
    assert(gapFinder(List()) == 0)
    assert(gapFinder(List[Int](0)) == 1)
    assert(gapFinder(List[Int](1)) == 0)
    assert(gapFinder(List[Int](2)) == 0)
    assert(gapFinder(List[Int](0, 1, 2)) == 3)
    assert(gapFinder(List[Int](0, 2, 4)) == 1)
    assert(gapFinder(List[Int](0, 1, 2, 4)) == 3)
    assert(gapFinder(List[Int](0, 1, 2, 4, 5)) == 3)
    
0
import java.util.Scanner;
class MissingNumber {
  public static void main(String[] args) {

    Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
    int n = scan.nextInt();
    int[] arr =new int[n];
    for (int i=0;i<n;i++){
      arr[i]=scan.nextInt();
    }
    for (int i=0;i<n;i++){
      if(arr[i+1]==arr[i]+1){

      }
      else{
        System.out.println(arr[i]+1);
        break;
      }
    }

  }
}
-1

Missing

Number=(1/2)(n)(n+1)-(Sum of all elements in the array)

Here n is the size of array+1.

-1

i got one algorithm for finding the missing number in the sorted list. its complexity is logN.

        public int execute2(int[] array) {
        int diff = Math.min(array[1]-array[0], array[2]-array[1]);
        int min = 0, max = arr.length-1;
        boolean missingNum = true;
        while(min<max) {
            int mid = (min + max) >>> 1;
            int leftDiff = array[mid] - array[min];
            if(leftDiff > diff * (mid - min)) {
                if(mid-min == 1)
                    return (array[mid] + array[min])/2;
                max = mid;
                missingNum = false;
                continue;
            }
            int rightDiff = array[max] - array[mid];
            if(rightDiff > diff * (max - mid)) {
                if(max-mid == 1)
                    return (array[max] + array[mid])/2;
                min = mid;
                missingNum = false;
                continue;
            }
            if(missingNum)
                break;
        }
        return -1;
    }
  • 1
    I see the code - can you describe what it does? There have been eight older answers: which is most similar, and how does yours differ? – greybeard Mar 27 '16 at 8:59
  • I posted this algo bcz the above solutions were not coming out of loop. I tried it.. if your series do not have any missing numbers the while loop will continue to run.. that's y i put that missingNum switch .. to break out of the while loop... – Vrajendra Singh Mandloi Mar 27 '16 at 10:32
-1

Based on algorithm provided by @phs

    public class Solution {
      public int missing(int[] array) {
        // write your solution here
        if(array == null){
          return -1;
        }
        if (array.length == 0) {
          return 1;
        }
        int left = 0;
        int right = array.length -1;
        while (left < right - 1) {
          int mid = left + (right - left) / 2;
          if (array[mid] - array[left] != mid - left) { //there is gap in [left, mid]
            right = mid;
          }else if (array[right] - array[mid] != right - mid) { //there is gap in [mid, right]
            left = mid;
          }else{ //there is no gapin [left, right], which means the missing num is the at 0 and N
            return array[0] == 1 ? array.length + 1 : 1 ;
          }

        }
        if (array[right] - array[left] == 2){ //missing number is between array[left] and array[right]
          return left + 2;
        }else{
          return array[0] == 1 ? -1 : 1; //when ther is only one element in array
        }

      }
    }
  • 1
    Explaining your code in more detail might be helpful. – Charlie Fish Sep 24 '16 at 23:34
-1
public static int findFirst(int[] arr) {
    int l = -1;
    int r = arr.length;
    while (r - l > 1) {
        int middle = (r + l) / 2;
        if (arr[middle] > middle) {
            r = middle;
        }
        l = middle;
    }
    return r;
}

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