I am using this method to clean the string

public static string CleanString(string dirtyString)
{
    string removeChars = " ?&^$#@!()+-,:;<>’\'-_*";
    string result = dirtyString;

    foreach (char c in removeChars)
    {
        result = result.Replace(c.ToString(), string.Empty);
    }

    return result;
}

This method works fine.. BUT there is a performance glitch in this method. everytime i pass the string, every character goes in loop, if i have a large string then it would take too much time to return the object.

Is there any other better way of doing the same thing?. like in LINQ or JQUERY / Javascript

Any suggestion would be appreciated.

  • 1
    For what purpose are you "cleaning" a string? – Russ Cam Jul 9 '12 at 13:14
  • i am basically dealing it with a lot of Qurystring values... – patel.milanb Jul 9 '12 at 13:15
  • 2
    Put all characters in a character class of regex, then replace all at once. – nhahtdh Jul 9 '12 at 13:15
  • 2
    Define "better". Any solution will have a loop over the characters. The drawback in your code is excess creation of string objects, not the loop over every character. – hatchet Jul 9 '12 at 13:22
  • 6
    @patel.milanb Then what you are looking for is HttpUtility.HtmlEncode not string cleaning – L.B Jul 9 '12 at 13:32
up vote 35 down vote accepted

OK, consider the following test:

public class CleanString
{
    //by MSDN http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/844skk0h(v=vs.71).aspx
    public static string UseRegex(string strIn)
    {
        // Replace invalid characters with empty strings.
        return Regex.Replace(strIn, @"[^\w\.@-]", "");
    }

    // by Paolo Tedesco
    public static String UseStringBuilder(string strIn)
    {
        const string removeChars = " ?&^$#@!()+-,:;<>’\'-_*";
        // specify capacity of StringBuilder to avoid resizing
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(strIn.Length);
        foreach (char x in strIn.Where(c => !removeChars.Contains(c)))
        {
            sb.Append(x);
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }

    // by Paolo Tedesco, but using a HashSet
    public static String UseStringBuilderWithHashSet(string strIn)
    {
        var hashSet = new HashSet<char>(" ?&^$#@!()+-,:;<>’\'-_*");
        // specify capacity of StringBuilder to avoid resizing
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(strIn.Length);
        foreach (char x in strIn.Where(c => !hashSet.Contains(c)))
        {
            sb.Append(x);
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }

    // by SteveDog
    public static string UseStringBuilderWithHashSet2(string dirtyString)
    {
        HashSet<char> removeChars = new HashSet<char>(" ?&^$#@!()+-,:;<>’\'-_*");
        StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder(dirtyString.Length);
        foreach (char c in dirtyString)
            if (removeChars.Contains(c))
                result.Append(c);
        return result.ToString();
    }

    // original by patel.milanb
    public static string UseReplace(string dirtyString)
    {
        string removeChars = " ?&^$#@!()+-,:;<>’\'-_*";
        string result = dirtyString;

        foreach (char c in removeChars)
        {
            result = result.Replace(c.ToString(), string.Empty);
        }

        return result;
    }

    // by L.B
    public static string UseWhere(string dirtyString)
    {
        return new String(dirtyString.Where(Char.IsLetterOrDigit).ToArray());
    }
}

static class Program
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        var dirtyString = "sdfdf.dsf8908()=(=(sadfJJLef@ssyd€sdöf////fj()=/§(§&/(\"&sdfdf.dsf8908()=(=(sadfJJLef@ssyd€sdöf////fj()=/§(§&/(\"&sdfdf.dsf8908()=(=(sadfJJLef@ssyd€sdöf";
        var sw = new Stopwatch();

        var iterations = 50000;

        sw.Start();
        for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            CleanString.<SomeMethod>(dirtyString);
        sw.Stop();
        Debug.WriteLine("CleanString.<SomeMethod>: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
        sw.Reset();

        ....
        <repeat>
        ....       
    }
}

Output

CleanString.UseReplace: 791
CleanString.UseStringBuilder: 2805
CleanString.UseStringBuilderWithHashSet: 521
CleanString.UseStringBuilderWithHashSet2: 331
CleanString.UseRegex: 1700
CleanString.UseWhere: 233

Conclusion

Does probably not matter which method you use.

The difference in time between the fasted (UseWhere: 233ms) and the slowest (UseStringBuilder: 2805ms) method is 2572ms when called 50000(!) times in a row. You should probably not need to care about it if don't run the method that often.

But if you do, use the UseWhere method (written by L.B); but also note that it is slightly different.

  • +1 nice complete answer - I enjoyed it :] – MoonKnight Jul 9 '12 at 13:50
  • What would this give return new String(dirtyString.Where(Char.IsLetterOrDigit).ToArray()) at your machine? – L.B Jul 9 '12 at 14:29
  • It's fast. 50000 iterations: 182ms (next one is UseStringBuilderWithHashSet2 with 266ms) – sloth Jul 9 '12 at 15:03
  • 5
    Just for the reccords, for UseStringBuilderWithHashSet and UseStringBuilderWithHashSet2 the test will be if (!removeChars.Contains(c)) – Guillaume Beauvois Jun 2 '15 at 7:37
  • Can L.B's UseWhere method be extended to allow additional characters? Like this: public static string UseWhereExtended(string dirtyString) { IEnumerable<char> stringQuery = from ch in dirtyString where char.IsLetterOrDigit(ch) || ch == '.' || ch == ',' || ch == '\'' || ch == '\"' || ch == '?' || ch == '!' select ch; return new string(stringQuery.ToArray()); } – ATutorMe Sep 21 '16 at 0:39

If it's purely speed and efficiency you are after, I would recommend doing something like this:

public static string CleanString(string dirtyString)
{
    HashSet<char> removeChars = new HashSet<char>(" ?&^$#@!()+-,:;<>’\'-_*");
    StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder(dirtyString.Length);
    foreach (char c in dirtyString)
        if (!removeChars.Contains(c)) // prevent dirty chars
            result.Append(c);
    return result.ToString();
}

RegEx is certainly an elegant solution, but it adds extra overhead. By specifying the starting length of the string builder, it will only need to allocate the memory once (and a second time for the ToString at the end). This will cut down on memory usage and increase the speed, especially on longer strings.

However, as L.B. said, if you are using this to properly encode text that is bound for HTML output, you should be using HttpUtility.HtmlEncode instead of doing it yourself.

  • this one looks good to me.. – patel.milanb Jul 9 '12 at 13:34
  • removeChars.IndexOf is O(n) operation . A HashSet would be better. – L.B Jul 9 '12 at 13:40
  • @L.B Thanks for the suggestion. I updated my example code. – Steven Doggart Jul 9 '12 at 13:47
  • 1
    You can also use a one-liner return new String(dirtyString.Where(c => !removeChars.Contains(c)).ToArray()); – L.B Jul 9 '12 at 14:06
  • 1
    @Qweick well, the space character is already included, but if there were any other white space characters that you wanted to include, you could just concatenate them to the string (e.g. "..." & vbTab). – Steven Doggart Aug 24 '15 at 8:27

use regex [?&^$#@!()+-,:;<>’\'-_*] for replacing with empty string

I don't know if, performance-wise, using a Regex or LINQ would be an improvement.
Something that could be useful, would be to create the new string with a StringBuilder instead of using string.Replace each time:

using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

static class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        const string removeChars = " ?&^$#@!()+-,:;<>’\'-_*";
        string result = "x&y(z)";
        // specify capacity of StringBuilder to avoid resizing
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(result.Length);
        foreach (char x in result.Where(c => !removeChars.Contains(c))) {
            sb.Append(x);
        }
        result = sb.ToString();
    }
}
  • this certainly helps. opens up a new idea for me using the StringBuilder class – patel.milanb Jul 9 '12 at 13:34
  • removeChars.Contains is O(n). A HashSet would be better. – L.B Jul 9 '12 at 13:38

Perhaps it helps to first explain the 'why' and then the 'what'. The reason you're getting slow performance is because c# copies-and-replaces the strings for each replacement. From my experience using Regex in .NET isn't always better - although in most scenario's (I think including this one) it'll probably work just fine.

If I really need performance I usually don't leave it up to luck and just tell the compiler exactly what I want: that is: create a string with the upper bound number of characters and copy all the chars in there that you need. It's also possible to replace the hashset with a switch / case or array in which case you might end up with a jump table or array lookup - which is even faster.

The 'pragmatic' best, but fast solution is:

char[] data = new char[dirtyString.Length];
int ptr = 0;
HashSet<char> hs = new HashSet<char>() { /* all your excluded chars go here */ };
foreach (char c in dirtyString)
    if (!hs.Contains(c))
        data[ptr++] = c;
return new string(data, 0, ptr);

BTW: this solution is incorrect when you want to process high surrogate Unicode characters - but can easily be adapted to include these characters.

-Stefan.

This one is even faster!
use:

string dirty=@"tfgtf$@$%gttg%$% 664%$";
string clean = dirty.Clean();


    public static string Clean(this String name)
    {
        var namearray = new Char[name.Length];

        var newIndex = 0;
        for (var index = 0; index < namearray.Length; index++)
        {
            var letter = (Int32)name[index];

            if (!((letter > 96 && letter < 123) || (letter > 64 && letter < 91) || (letter > 47 && letter < 58)))
                continue;

            namearray[newIndex] = (Char)letter;
            ++newIndex;
        }

        return new String(namearray).TrimEnd();
    }

I am not able to spend time on acid testing this but this line did not actually clean slashes as desired.

HashSet<char> removeChars = new HashSet<char>(" ?&^$#@!()+-,:;<>’\'-_*");

I had to add slashes individually and escape the backslash

HashSet<char> removeChars = new HashSet<char>(" ?&^$#@!()+-,:;<>’'-_*");
removeChars.Add('/');
removeChars.Add('\\');

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