563

How can I convert the following?

2934 (integer) to B76 (hex)

Let me explain what I am trying to do. I have User IDs in my database that are stored as integers. Rather than having users reference their IDs I want to let them use the hex value. The main reason is because it's shorter.

So not only do I need to go from integer to hex but I also need to go from hex to integer.

Is there an easy way to do this in C#?

4
  • 1
    You have a good point. But we're trying to convert the integer ID into something that takes up fewer characters. Thanks for the insight tho.
    – codette
    Jul 16, 2009 at 20:24
  • A fashionably belated response, but have you considered some sort of Integer shortening implementation? If the only goal is to make the user ID as short as possible, I'd be interested to know if there is any other apparent reason why you specifically require hexadecimal conversion - unless I missed it of course. Is it clear and known (if so required) that user IDs are in actual fact a hexadecimal representation of the real value?
    – WynandB
    Oct 17, 2010 at 6:49
  • 1
    @codette Storing numbers as numbers will take up the least space while still readable. For example, 4 bytes for numbers up to 2bln (integer). Or if it's too long for any numeric type, use a binary field.
    – Luc
    Jan 25, 2013 at 12:30
  • 9
    @Luc The OP states I have User IDs in my database that are stored as integers. Rather than having users reference their IDs I want to let them use the hex value. so codette is storing the values as an int, but converting to/from hex for the user.
    – Trisped
    Apr 4, 2013 at 18:00

12 Answers 12

993
// Store integer 182
int intValue = 182;
// Convert integer 182 as a hex in a string variable
string hexValue = intValue.ToString("X");
// Convert the hex string back to the number
int intAgain = int.Parse(hexValue, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.HexNumber);

from http://www.geekpedia.com/KB8_How-do-I-convert-from-decimal-to-hex-and-hex-to-decimal.html


HINT (from the comments):

Use .ToString("X4") to get exactly 4 digits with leading 0, or .ToString("x4") for lowercase hex numbers (likewise for more digits).

11
  • 200
    you can also specify the number of digits by using: decValue.ToString("X4")
    – Martin
    Oct 27, 2009 at 9:04
  • 92
    Since this has not been mentioned here: If you use a lowecase x (e.g. ToString("x4) you get a lowercase hex value (e.g. b76).
    – Skalli
    Feb 28, 2014 at 9:17
  • 16
    Am I the only one having a hard time tolerating the variable name "decValue" since it is not a decimal at all? Sorry man, I know it is from another source, but stackoverflow should be better than that. Nov 3, 2015 at 10:24
  • 8
    @bonitzenator lol, in the 6 years this answer has existed, I've never noticed that. Updated! Nov 3, 2015 at 15:07
  • 2
    FTR; decValue is arguably better than intValue because an integer can be expressed in either decimal notation or hexadecimal notation. intValue is technically more ambiguous, as decValue indicates clearly (in this context) that you're working with the decimal representation rather than the hexadecimal. Just my 2A¢.
    – Dan Lugg
    Aug 24, 2017 at 5:05
126

Use:

int myInt = 2934;
string myHex = myInt.ToString("X");  // Gives you hexadecimal
int myNewInt = Convert.ToInt32(myHex, 16);  // Back to int again.

See How to: Convert Between Hexadecimal Strings and Numeric Types (C# Programming Guide) for more information and examples.

0
68

Try the following to convert it to hex

public static string ToHex(this int value) {
  return String.Format("0x{0:X}", value);
}

And back again

public static int FromHex(string value) {
  // strip the leading 0x
  if ( value.StartsWith("0x", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)) {
    value = value.Substring(2);
  }
  return Int32.Parse(value, NumberStyles.HexNumber);
}
3
  • 9
    or the "0x" bit, which is something the OP didn't really want Jul 16, 2009 at 20:11
  • Well, it didn't really answer the OP's question. In fact, the code you presented didn't work for the OP's problem. I rarely downvote, but if I do, I always make a comment and check back to see if the answer was edited, and in many cases I remove the downvote again. No offense. Jul 16, 2009 at 20:18
  • 8
    (I'm already sorry I commented). The question was "how do I convert 2934 to B76". Other answers did indeed only provide half of the solution, but your's converted "2934" to "0xB76". It's not a bad solution at all, but it's not an answer to the question that was asked. Jul 16, 2009 at 20:31
36
int valInt = 12;
Console.WriteLine(valInt.ToString("X"));  // C  ~ possibly single-digit output 
Console.WriteLine(valInt.ToString("X2")); // 0C ~ always double-digit output
19
string HexFromID(int ID)
{
    return ID.ToString("X");
}

int IDFromHex(string HexID)
{
    return int.Parse(HexID, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.HexNumber);
}

I really question the value of this, though. You're stated goal is to make the value shorter, which it will, but that isn't a goal in itself. You really mean either make it easier to remember or easier to type.

If you mean easier to remember, then you're taking a step backwards. We know it's still the same size, just encoded differently. But your users won't know that the letters are restricted to 'A-F', and so the ID will occupy the same conceptual space for them as if the letter 'A-Z' were allowed. So instead of being like memorizing a telephone number, it's more like memorizing a GUID (of equivalent length).

If you mean typing, instead of being able to use the keypad the user now must use the main part of the keyboard. It's likely to be more difficult to type, because it won't be a word their fingers recognize.

A much better option is to actually let them pick a real username.

4
  • The goal really is to take up fewer characters. Take twitter for example where they only allow 140 character messages. We're doing something similar so we're trying to give our users a way of shortening their user ID.
    – codette
    Jul 16, 2009 at 20:41
  • 3
    In that case, you should think about a binary representation. This is likely a 32bit int that just doesn't use the negative portion, meaning 16bits of resolution. You can put that in one unicode character pretty easily. Jul 16, 2009 at 21:14
  • 5
    Belated response, but - a 32 bit (signed) int that never contains negative numbers has 31 bits of resolution, not 16. You might be able to stuff that into one unicode character, but when it's UTF8 encoded, unless it's between 0 and 127 it's going to take up more characters than the hex equivalent. HEX is not a terrible solution for this problem, but a base64 of the four bytes in the int would be even shorter (and you could trim the padding)
    – James Hart
    Aug 16, 2011 at 21:08
  • Yeah, I had a brain-fart right there. I wish I could edit a comment. Oct 31, 2014 at 20:12
15

To Hex:

string hex = intValue.ToString("X");

To int:

int intValue = int.Parse(hex, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.HexNumber)
9

I created my own solution for converting int to Hex string and back before I found this answer. Not surprisingly, it's considerably faster than the .net solution since there's less code overhead.

        /// <summary>
        /// Convert an integer to a string of hexidecimal numbers.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="n">The int to convert to Hex representation</param>
        /// <param name="len">number of digits in the hex string. Pads with leading zeros.</param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        private static String IntToHexString(int n, int len)
        {
            char[] ch = new char[len--];
            for (int i = len; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                ch[len - i] = ByteToHexChar((byte)((uint)(n >> 4 * i) & 15));
            }
            return new String(ch);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Convert a byte to a hexidecimal char
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="b"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        private static char ByteToHexChar(byte b)
        {
            if (b < 0 || b > 15)
                throw new Exception("IntToHexChar: input out of range for Hex value");
            return b < 10 ? (char)(b + 48) : (char)(b + 55);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Convert a hexidecimal string to an base 10 integer
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="str"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        private static int HexStringToInt(String str)
        {
            int value = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
            {
                value += HexCharToInt(str[i]) << ((str.Length - 1 - i) * 4);
            }
            return value;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Convert a hex char to it an integer.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="ch"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        private static int HexCharToInt(char ch)
        {
            if (ch < 48 || (ch > 57 && ch < 65) || ch > 70)
                throw new Exception("HexCharToInt: input out of range for Hex value");
            return (ch < 58) ? ch - 48 : ch - 55;
        }

Timing code:

static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int num = 3500;
            long start = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp();
            for (int i = 0; i < 2000000; i++)
                if (num != HexStringToInt(IntToHexString(num, 3)))
                    Console.WriteLine(num + " = " + HexStringToInt(IntToHexString(num, 3)));
            long end = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp();
            Console.WriteLine(((double)end - (double)start)/(double)System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.Frequency);

            for (int i = 0; i < 2000000; i++)
                if (num != Convert.ToInt32(num.ToString("X3"), 16))
                    Console.WriteLine(i);
            end = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp();
            Console.WriteLine(((double)end - (double)start)/(double)System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.Frequency);
            Console.ReadLine(); 
        }

Results:

Digits : MyCode : .Net
1 : 0.21 : 0.45
2 : 0.31 : 0.56
4 : 0.51 : 0.78
6 : 0.70 : 1.02
8 : 0.90 : 1.25
2

NET FRAMEWORK

Very well explained and few programming lines GOOD JOB

// Store integer 182
int intValue = 182;
// Convert integer 182 as a hex in a string variable
string hexValue = intValue.ToString("X");
// Convert the hex string back to the number
int intAgain = int.Parse(hexValue, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.HexNumber);

PASCAL >> C#

http://files.hddguru.com/download/Software/Seagate/St_mem.pas

Something from the old school very old procedure of pascal converted to C #

    /// <summary>
    /// Conver number from Decadic to Hexadecimal
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="w"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public string MakeHex(int w)
    {
        try
        {
           char[] b =  {'0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','A','B','C','D','E','F'};
           char[] S = new char[7];

              S[0] = b[(w >> 24) & 15];
              S[1] = b[(w >> 20) & 15];
              S[2] = b[(w >> 16) & 15];
              S[3] = b[(w >> 12) & 15];
              S[4] = b[(w >> 8) & 15];
              S[5] = b[(w >> 4) & 15];
              S[6] = b[w & 15];

              string _MakeHex = new string(S, 0, S.Count());

              return _MakeHex;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {

            throw;
        }
    }
1
  • 2
    Thank you for reply. If possible please translate to English as best you can. Don't worry about any possible grammar mistakes, we will correct them.
    – bcperth
    Oct 11, 2018 at 22:50
1

Print integer in hex-value with zero-padding (if needed) :

int intValue = 1234;

Console.WriteLine("{0,0:D4} {0,0:X3}", intValue); 

https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/base-types/how-to-pad-a-number-with-leading-zeros

1

Like @Joel C, I think this is an AB problem. There’s an existing algorithm that I think suits the need as described better which is uuencode, which I’m sure has many public domain implementations, perhaps tweaked to eliminate characters that looks very similar like 0/O. Likely to produce significantly shorter strings. I think this is what URL shorteners use.

1
0

This was an answer to a homework problem from long ago .. like when there were still only 3 Star Wars movies. I am sure it is not perfect. It seems we were more interested in algorithms. I added some stuff to main to see if returns what the standard functions do. Need a reverse string function .. easy peasy. Call it from the command line "./a.out 123" etc. Trust but verify, of course. Best

char* decToBase(int n,const int base)
{
    char hexb[] = "0123456789abcdef";
    int i=0;

    char* s = new char[BSIZE];

    while(n)
    {
        s[i++] = hexb[n % base];
        n = n / base;
    }
    rev_string(s);

    return s;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int num = atoi(argv[argc-1]);
    char* str = decToBase(num,2);
    cout << str << " " << std::bitset<32>(num).to_string() << '\n';
    cout << decToBase(num,8) << " " << oct << num << '\n';
    cout << decToBase(num,16) << " " << hex << num << '\n';
    delete[] str;

    return 0;
}
-5

int to hex:

int a = 72;

Console.WriteLine("{0:X}", a);

hex to int:

int b = 0xB76;

Console.WriteLine(b);

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