47

While creating a table I am getting the following error:

ERROR 1293 (HY000): Incorrect table definition; there can be only one TIMESTAMP column with CURRENT_TIMESTAMP in DEFAULT or ON UPDATE clause

The problem is that I don't actually have two columns TIMESTAMP with CURRENT_TIMESTAMP as default, neither I am using ON UPDATE clause.

The DDL query I'm trying to execute is

CREATE TABLE user(
    /* Basic Information */
    id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    firstname VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
    surname VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
    email VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL UNIQUE,
    username VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL UNIQUE,
    password CHAR(40) NOT NULL,

    /* System status information */
    active BOOL NOT NULL DEFAULT FALSE,
    validated BOOL NOT NULL DEFAULT FALSE,
    date_validated TIMESTAMP,
    date_registered TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,

    /* Index */
    PRIMARY KEY (id)
) Engine=InnoDB;

What's causing the issue?

0

3 Answers 3

55

You can use two timestamp in one table. For default, use DEFAULT field first and then the rest timestamp fields.

Below query should work.

CREATE TABLE myTable 
(
 id INT,
 date_registered TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, 
 date_validated TIMESTAMP
);

Demo at sqlfiddle

3
  • Thanks. Best answer - let's me keep both attributes as TIMESTAMP. Still the fact that the order in which they are passed into the query is rather strange. Commented Jul 9, 2012 at 18:02
  • 1
    @norfavrell : Also read my question, Query with two timestamp not working. This will solve why your query was not working Commented Jul 9, 2012 at 19:24
  • This throws an exception. You have to manually set the dates when inserting. The default doesn't work
    – user16422658
    Commented Apr 23, 2022 at 20:48
15

I think it's important to note that this limitation is no longer present as of MySQL 5.6.5. The limitation has been removed and some additional functionality has been added. Specifically: multiple TIMESTAMP as well as DATETIME fields can have an automated default which will set the field to the current timestamp/datetime as explained in the following blog post (apparently written by the person who made the fix): http://optimize-this.blogspot.com/2012/04/datetime-default-now-finally-available.html

More Specifics
Additionally it may be valuable to read up on exactly how to produce default date & time values.
As outlined in the link below you can set both DATETIME & TIMESTAMP data types so the column will have a DEFAULT value of the current date & time of the INSERT operation for a given row. Alternately you can set them ON UPDATE to have the current date & time set in the field on an UPDATE operation.
The Link:
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/timestamp-initialization.html

Here's what both would look like in a CREATE TABLE statement:

CREATE TABLE t1 (
ts1 TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
,ts2 TIMESTAMP DEFAULT NOW()
);

It's worth pointing out that CURRENT_TIMESTAMP is an alias to NOW().
Additionally setting a TIMESTAMP or DATETIME field to NULL will change the columns DEFAULT to null instead of a date time value, (again see the link for specifics & more details).
Another potentially valuable point is that DATETIME can contain a date range from:
1000-01-01 to 9999-12-31
while TIMESTAMP has a range of:
1970-01-01 00:00:01 to 2038-01-19 03:14:07
For additional comparisons between DATETIME & TIMESTAMP read this MySQL manual page comparing them.

3
  • No problem, glad it was helpful information... I just have to say I'm very glad they lifted this, (according to the blogger), artificial limitation... Though, unfortunately for me, I re-discovered this limitation, which I had forgotten, moving my 5.6.5 code to a webhost with 5.5.x on it...
    – MER
    Commented Sep 30, 2014 at 11:03
  • This solved part of my problems. Problem is that when I inserted from a batch file in a transaction (begin/ commit) it didn't update. After that I updated the rows and they got the timestamp column set with CURRENT_TIMESTAMP .
    – Rodrigo
    Commented Jun 27, 2016 at 18:41
  • @Rodrigo could the problem be that you haven't set both the default & the update? There are some other possible catches I got from skimming the following: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/timestamp-initialization.html If I remember right the syntax to make the default occur may have been changed from 5.5 to 5.x.
    – MER
    Commented Jun 28, 2016 at 0:36
2

Allow me to quote my own blog post: "MySQL, for whatever reason, only allows one auto-updating timestamp per table. There are a number of ways around this but not all of the ways don’t suck."

The way I recommend is to use a trigger for each timestamp:

CREATE TRIGGER customer_create BEFORE INSERT ON `customer`
FOR EACH ROW SET NEW.created_at = NOW(), NEW.updated_at = NOW();

See the post itself for more details.

2
  • Oh, I didn't realize you were only trying to auto-update ONE of the two timestamps. That seems kind of weird that you're having that problem, then. Anyway, if you do what I suggest here, it should fix your problem, even if it might be slight overkill. Commented Jul 9, 2012 at 17:39
  • The reason can be found in this stackoverflow post which redirects to a MySQL thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/4489548/…
    – BlakBat
    Commented Dec 7, 2012 at 15:19

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