5

Basically, I want to create Counter objects, all they have to do is hold number values. And in my resetCounters method, I would like to reset each object's values. This is probably very easy, but I'm a newb.

public class Counter
{
    Random number = new Random();

    Counter()
    {
        Random number = new Random();
    }

    public Random getNumber()
    {
        return number;
    }

    public void setNumber(Random number)
    {
        this.number = number;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        Counter counter1 = new Counter();
        Counter counter2 = new Counter();
        Counter counter3 = new Counter();
        Counter counter4 = new Counter();
        Counter counter5 = new Counter();

    }

    public static void resetCounters()
    {

    }
    }
15
  • There is something not correct in the program. You are not calling resetCounter() anywhere.
    – kosa
    Jul 9, 2012 at 18:50
  • I think he is asking about what to put in the resetCounters() code. Jul 9, 2012 at 18:51
  • True, I haven't called it yet in main, but I don't understand what code I need to put inside my resetCounters method.
    – user1077685
    Jul 9, 2012 at 18:51
  • 1
    Well, given that the counters are all local variables in main, there's no possible implementation to do what the OP wants. Jul 9, 2012 at 18:51
  • 1
    Is this homework? If yes, please tag. @LouisWasserman: I feel there are at least two options...
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 18:56

5 Answers 5

5

First option: Memorize each instance of Counter.

Collect each instance of Counter in some static collection. To reset all, simply iterate over all items in the collection. But strong references are too strong for this -- make sure it's a collection of weak references.

Remarks:

  1. Using weak references will avoid the issue that the Counter objects exist indefinitely only because of their reference from within the static collection. Objects that are referred to only by weak references are eventually collected by the garbage collector.
  2. The collection of every instance can be achieved by declaring the Counter constructor private and allowing only construction through a static member function which will also do the registration. (Or use some other incarnation of the Factory pattern.) I believe a factory is the way to go here, since each construction of an object has to carry out also a side effect. But perhaps it will make do to have the Counter constructor register this with the static collection.

Second option: Generation counter

Keep a static generation counter of type long, and also a copy of this counter in each instance. When resetting all counters, just increase the static generation counter. The getNumber() method will then check the static generation counter against its own copy and reset the counter if the static generation counter has changed.

(I don't really know the "official" name for this trick. How to zero out array in O(1)?)

3
  • Where is a reference to garbage collection here? Your comments on our answers apply here too.
    – GETah
    Jul 9, 2012 at 19:19
  • Forgive me if I'm wrong, but this example is a bit trivial to use WeakReferences, don't you think? From the ground up, we have a static collection, the contents of which always represents all the counters we care about. There is no memory leak because the program always cares about the counters in that collection.
    – Nicole
    Jul 11, 2012 at 17:21
  • Ok, now I am asking for forgiveness. I just read the CounterFactory answer, where you really would need WeakReferences (since the static collection is hidden behind a dumb construction method that could be used an unlimited number of times). It just didn't make sense to me in the context of a directly-known, limited static collection.
    – Nicole
    Jul 11, 2012 at 17:24
4

Since we have no idea what the context is, we can't narrow down the specific thing you should do is, but the options that occur to me immediately are...

1: If the counters have distinct meanings beyond "counter1, counter2, counter3," then they could be static class variables (with more useful names).

   public class Counter {
       static Counter counter1 = new Counter();
       ...
       public void resetCounters() {
         counter1.clear();
         counter2.clear();
          ...
        }
      }

2: If you just want several distinct counters, and they have no particular meaning by themselves, and you know that there will only ever be five of them, then you should use an array:

public class Counter {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Counter[] counters = {new Counter(), new Counter(), new Counter(), new Counter(), new Counter()};
    ...
  }
  static void resetCounters(Counter[] counters) {
    for (Counter c : counters) {
      c.reset();
    }
  }
}

Or, if you're planning to have an arbitrary number of them, you might try one of the fancier factory patterns. It really depends on what the context is, what you're actually trying to do, and what the point of the exercise is.

1
  • Great usage of the YAGNI pattern (one of the most important ones! ;-)
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 19:28
2

Since you're working with a large number of objects, you would be well served placing them in some sort of collection, like an ArrayList.

List<Counter> counters = new ArrayList<Counter>();

Insert all of your counters into there using the .add() method. Then, you can author your resetCounters() method in this manner:

public static void resetCounters(List<Counter> counters) {
    for(Counter c: counters) {
        // perform some action to reset the counters, as described by you
    }
}
5
  • All Counter objects will live forever, since the garbage collector will think that they are used through the counters collection.
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 18:59
  • 2
    That depends on your definition of "reset". If you want to overwrite the contents in the object, this works fine. If you want to send all Counter objects in for garbage collection, then employ the use of List.clear().
    – Makoto
    Jul 9, 2012 at 19:06
  • Well, no. I believe the OP means that reset() clears the value of all existing Counter instances, whatever "clear" means here. But consider a counter that has been .add()ed to the counters but has no other reference pointing to it. It is essentially dead, but still will be reset. Does this make sense to you?
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 19:27
  • It's not sinking in 100%. The only way that the OP would be able to effectively maintain all references of a Counter object would be to place them in some sort of collection. Is there some other way that you can keep track of object instances that doesn't involve code for each and every object?
    – Makoto
    Jul 9, 2012 at 20:16
  • See my answer right below :-) First option.
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 20:17
1

1. First of all there is not need to Initialize a Random nos as an instance variable,just have a Object Reference Varaible, as you are already initializing it in the Constructor.

eg:

Random number;

2. Create an ArrayList and store all the Counter objects.

ArrayList<Counter> arr = new ArrayList<Counter>();

3. Add each counter object in to the ArrayList.

4. Make reset function Non-static..there is no need for it to be static.

5. Iterate and reset...

for (Counter c : arr){

      c.reset();
    }

6. In reset() do the following..

public void reset(){

         this.number = 0;

     }
10
  • Same issue here: All Counter objects will live forever, since the garbage collector will think that they are used through the counters collection.
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 19:04
  • use are resetting the objects, not making them ready for the garbage collection..right...!! Jul 9, 2012 at 19:06
  • Right. But same as above: Consider a counter that has been .add()ed to the counters but has no other reference pointing to it. It is essentially dead, but still will be reset. Does this make sense to you?
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 19:27
  • 1
    You don't always have (or want to have) manual control over the lifetime of your objects, that's what the garbage collector does in the first place.
    – krlmlr
    Jul 10, 2012 at 6:38
  • 1
    Please tell me another thing first. Do you mind if an application, say, a service that is not intended to be restarted, leaks memory -- the longer it runs, the more memory it consumes, finally taking down the whole system?
    – krlmlr
    Jul 10, 2012 at 9:11
1

The easiest and elegant way of achieving what you want is keeping a reference to all created objects somewhere, in a factory for example and resetting them when needed.

public class CounterFactory{
      private List<Counter> counters = new ArrayList<Counter>();

      public Counter createCounter(){
          Counter c = new Counter();
          counters.add(c);
          return c;
      }
      public void resetCounters(){
          for(Counter c : counters) c.setNumber(new Random());
      }
}

And in the main method, use it this way:

public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    CounterFactory f = new CounterFactory();
    Counter counter1 = f.createCounter();
    Counter counter2 = f.createCounter();
    Counter counter3 = f.createCounter();
    Counter counter4 = f.createCounter();
    Counter counter5 = f.createCounter();

    // Reset all counters
    f.resetCounters();
}
8
  • The same applies here: All Counter objects will live forever, since the garbage collector will think that they are used through the counters collection.
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 19:02
  • That is your choice in the factory, just add a clear method where you clean up your list and you are done.
    – GETah
    Jul 9, 2012 at 19:14
  • What would this clear method do, and when would it be called?
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 19:57
  • 1
    So clear just cleans the list. But what about all those counters hanging around -- they will not be reset anymore when resetCounters is called. Or does clear distinguish between counters still in use, and counters that are obsolete and can be removed -- if so, how?
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 20:08
  • 1
    You might want to check out this article about weak references as well as the Java docs. (Actually, I have provided both links in my answer.) Please do, and get back to me if you have further questions.
    – krlmlr
    Jul 9, 2012 at 20:35

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