6

I do not understad why with some Entity objects I can set the Id and for others objects I get an error and says me that the Id can't be null and I have to pass an object instead.

e.g.:

$log = new Log();
$log->setTypeId(1);
$log->setUserId(1);
$entityManager->persist($log);
$entityManager->flush();

If I try the code above I get error that says: Integrity constraint violation: 1048 Column 'user_id' cannot be null. And I have to first create the Type Object and de User object and the pass them:

$log->setType($TypeObject)
$log->setUser($UserObject)

But for other entity objects I have no problem assigning the value directly, why is that?

This is my Entity Log:

<?php
/**
 * @Entity
 * @Table(name="log")
 * @HasLifecycleCallbacks
 */
class Log
{
    /**
     * @var type 
     * @Id
     * @Column(type="integer")
     * @GeneratedValue
     */
    protected $id;

     /**
     *
     * @var type 
     * @Column(type="integer")
     */
    protected $user_id;

     /**
     *
     * @var type 
     * @Column(type="integer")
     */
    protected $type_id;

     /**
     *
     * @var type 
     * @Column(type="datetime")
     */
    protected $created;

    /**
     *
     * @var type 
     * @ManyToOne(targetEntity="User", inversedBy="logs")
     */
    protected $user;

    /**
     *
     * @ManyToOne(targetEntity="Type", inversedBy="logs")
     */
    protected $type;

    public function getId()
    {
        return $this->id;
    }

    public function getUserId()
    {
        return $this->user_id;
    }

    public function getTypeId()
    {
        return $this->type_id;
    }

    public function getCreated()
    {
        return $this->created;
    }

    public function setUserId($userId)
    {
        $this->user_id = $userId;
    }

    public function setTypeId($typeId)
    {
        $this->type_id = $typeId;
    }

    public function setCreated($created)
    {
        $this->created = $created;
    }

    public function setUser($user)
    {
        $this->user = $user;
    }

    public function setType($type)
    {
        $this->type = $type;
    }

    /**
     * @PrePersist
     */
    public function prePersist()
    {
        $this->setCreated(new DateTime());
    }

}
?>
1
  • 1
    glad that helped. This tipped me into the 1K mark. woohoo. Aug 1, 2012 at 19:36

2 Answers 2

30

The existing answer never did sit well with me. There are many valid scenarios where loading an object just to define the relationship while already having the FK handy just does not make any sense at all.

A better solution is to use Doctrine's EntityManager's getRefrence method.

Reference Proxies...

The method EntityManager#getReference($entityName, $identifier) lets you obtain a reference to an entity for which the identifier is known, without loading that entity from the database. This is useful, for example, as a performance enhancement, when you want to establish an association to an entity for which you have the identifier. You could simply do this:

<?php
  // $em instanceof EntityManager, $cart instanceof MyProject\Model\Cart
  // $itemId comes from somewhere, probably a request parameter
  $item = $em->getReference(\MyProject\Model\Item::class, $itemId);
  $cart->addItem($item);

Maybe this was not available when this question was first posted - I don't know.

5
  • 3
    I didn't know about this method and it looks like exactly what the original poster is asking for. Feb 4, 2014 at 15:39
  • This is perfect. Is this a new feature?
    – pagliuca
    Feb 15, 2014 at 2:55
  • I tried to determine that and am not certain when this became available (2.0 > ?). Was added in last year.
    – ficuscr
    Feb 20, 2014 at 1:47
  • It could be nice to place a note about this feature to new Documentation section under Doctrine 2 tag (stackoverflow.com/documentation/doctrine2)
    – Arkemlar
    Sep 29, 2016 at 19:26
  • Yan, Thanks for suggestion. I honestly was not aware of this SO feature, I'll need to read up. Feel free to do so though if you would like.
    – ficuscr
    Sep 29, 2016 at 19:31
3

EDIT

I found this statement on the website of Doctrine2. It's a best practice that you might want to follow when coding your models.

Doctrine2 Best Practices

25.9. Don’t map foreign keys to fields in an entity

Foreign keys have no meaning whatsoever in an object model. Foreign keys are how a relational database establishes relationships. Your object model establishes relationships through object references. Thus mapping foreign keys to object fields heavily leaks details of the relational model into the object model, something you really should not do

EDIT

Doctrine does the mapping from your objects to their respective Ids.

What you've done here is a bit redundant.

You've essentially told doctrine the same thing twice.

You've told it that it has a 'user_id' column AND that it also has a User object, which are the same thing. But doctrine can already guess that this relationship will have a user_id column based on the fact that the log class has a user object inside.

You should simply do the following instead

<?php
/**
 * @Entity
 * @Table(name="log")
 * @HasLifecycleCallbacks
 */
class Log
{
    /**
     * @var type 
     * @Id
     * @Column(type="integer")
     * @GeneratedValue
     */
    protected $id;

     /**
     *
     * @var type 
     * @Column(type="datetime")
     */
    protected $created;

    /**
     *
     * @var type 
     * @ManyToOne(targetEntity="User", inversedBy="logs")
     */
    protected $user;

    /**
     *
     * @ManyToOne(targetEntity="Type", inversedBy="logs")
     */
    protected $type;

    public function getId()
    {
        return $this->id;
    }

    public function getCreated()
    {
        return $this->created;
    }

    public function setCreated($created)
    {
        $this->created = $created;
    }

    public function setUser($user)
    {
        $this->user = $user;
    }

    public function setType($type)
    {
        $this->type = $type;
    }

    /**
     * @PrePersist
     */
    public function prePersist()
    {
        $this->setCreated(new DateTime());
    }

}

Doctrine will worry about the user_id and type_id on it's own. You don't have to worry about it. This way you get to work with full fledged objects, making it easier to program, instead of having to worry about id's. Doctrine will handle that.

If ALL you have is an id, because that's what you're using on the front end, then just fetch the object associated with that id using the Entitymanager.

$user = $em->getEntity( 'User', $idFromWeb );
$log = new Log();
$log->setUser( $user );
5
  • 1
    Retrieving $user from the db seems like an overhead. If the log entry only requires the UserId, why should you retrieve the whole user record. Is there any way to avoid this? Oct 11, 2012 at 6:11
  • Mubix, you're right. But during this request you've probably already fetched the user entity anyway to get their preferences or verify password information or other things. Doctrine2 also only ever fetches the entity once. If you call getEntity multiple times Doctrine2 will keep returning the same object without going back to the database. Oct 11, 2012 at 22:17
  • 3
    And in a scenario where you are doing some batch operation and loading up all the referenced entities just to have Doctrine snag the FK? Is there no way to get around this? I feel dirty making all these extra calls. Gonna write a raw PDO statement or not use the mapping and just load that entity through the repository from controller code.
    – ficuscr
    Jan 31, 2014 at 5:48
  • Doctrine is an ORM and in the case of batch operations it can be slower. It uses the UnitOfWork pattern to make batch updates more efficient but if you're really worried about speed it's usually better to code the statements yourself, although this takes more time. This is one of the drawbacks of an ORM. Feb 4, 2014 at 15:37
  • I know this is the doctrine way of doing things. However, this brings me nightmares from a time of a developer was loading the entire object on a loop and the entire application was super slow just to get the FK. Mar 26, 2019 at 4:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.