67

What is the proper way to provide a semantic caption for an HTML list? For example, the following list has a "title"/"caption".

Fruit

  • Apple
  • Pear
  • Orange

How should the word "fruit" be handled, in a such way that it is semantically associated with the list itself?

  • The HTML specifications need to add caption, legend and note attributes or tags to elements. Images, tables, lists and other non-text objects have a title, legend and/or note attached to it in publications, and a useful markup language needs to reflect that convention. – user1322720 Jan 24 '15 at 10:56
  • 7
    I'm surprised this question has been closed; it's clearly about semantics, not aesthetics, or any other subjective topic. The question is directly asking "Is there an appropriate semantic markup for this situation?" and, insofar as HTML5 is concerned, the answer is "yes". – megaflop Feb 20 '17 at 9:41
  • 6
    I'm tired of seeing so many questions which are of my interest as being closed as "opinion-based". It is a contraproductive. Let us express our opinions. Also, this question is about "best practice". People can have valid arguments regarding best practices (with sources). We want those arguments. Its not all about "opinions" – Mladen Adamovic May 27 '17 at 16:28
  • 1
    I've voted to re-open this question and edited it to sound less opinion-y. Now it clearly asks for a correct semantic way to add a title. – Lazar Ljubenović Nov 14 '18 at 9:49
65

While there is no caption or heading element structuring your markup effectively can have the same effect. Here are some suggestions:

Nested List

<ul>
    <li>
        Fruit
        <ul>
            <li>Apple</li>
            <li>Pear</li>
            <li>Organge</li>
        </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

Heading Prior to List

<hX>Fruit</hX>
<ul>
    <li>Apple</li>
    <li>Pear</li>
    <li>Orange</li>
</ul>

Definition List

<dl>
  <dt>Fruit</dt>
  <dd>Apple</dd>
  <dd>Pear</dd>
  <dd>Orange</dd>
</dl>
  • 2
    @alohci If there are going to be more definitions in the list what's wrong w/ a definition list or an unordered list? – ahsteele Jul 17 '09 at 13:38
  • 2
    @Alohci: Please elaborate. Intrigued by your comment but as it stands it's not helpful at all as you don't explain why the other options are not 'semantically valid' – Stijn de Witt Apr 14 '14 at 11:31
  • 4
    @StijndeWitt - That's all true. It's incorrect semantics in this instance only because that's not in the question. That's the problem with getting HTML markup correct, the actual content and the context it's in matters. – Alohci Apr 14 '14 at 16:38
  • 2
    @JeffereyCave Having a <ul> (or any other block-level element) as a child of a <p> is invalid according to the HTML specification, which states that <p> can only have "phrasing content" as child nodes. – megaflop Jan 26 '16 at 16:58
  • 3
    @ahsteele Interesting... MDN has it listed as Description List... Oh! "Prior to HTML5, [it] was known as a definition list." developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/dl. Your link was for html4. And on that link, they give an example of a dl representing a dialog, with each dt marking the speaker and dd having what they say. So I'm pretty sure they, whatever they're called, can properly be used as in this way as well. – RoboticRenaissance Sep 8 '16 at 19:22
38

Option 1

HTML5 has the figure and figcaption elements, which I find work quite nicely.

Example:

<figure>
    <figcaption>Fruit</figcaption>
    <ul>
        <li>Apple</li>
        <li>Pear</li>
        <li>Orange</li>
    </ul>
</figure>

These are then easily styled with CSS.


Option 2

Using CSS3's ::before pseudo-element can be a nice solution:

HTML:

<ul title="Fruit">
    <li>Apple</li>
    <li>Pear</li>
    <li>Orange</li>
</ul>

CSS:

ul[title]::before {
    content: attr(title);
    /* then add some nice styling as needed, eg: */
    display: block;
    font-weight: bold;
    padding: 4px;
}

You can, of course, use a different selector than ul[title]; for example, you could add a 'title-as-header' class and use ul.title-as-header::before instead, or whatever you need.

This does have the side effect of giving you a tooltip for the whole list. If you don't want such a tooltip, you could use a data attribute instead (e.g., <ul data-title="fruit"> and ul[data-title]::before { content: attr(data-title); }).

  • Your answer is what the specs is saying. I wonder why it's not the top voted one. – Ahmed Mahmoud Mar 7 at 8:33
  • @AhmedMahmoud Probably because the top answer is 7 years older than this one! – megaflop Mar 7 at 9:30
  • Oh, the time flies. Didn't notice the date. – Ahmed Mahmoud Mar 7 at 11:49
12

As far as I know, there are no provisions in current HTML specs for providing a caption for a list, as there are with tables. I'd stay with using either a classed paragraph, or a header tag for now.

<h3>Fruit</h3>
<ul>
    <li>Apple</li>
    <li>Pear</li>
    <li>Orange</li>
</ul>

In the future, when HTML5 gains wider adoption, you will be able to use the <legend> and <figure> tags to accomplish this slightly more semantically.

See this post on the W3C mailing list for more information.

1

There is no caption-like tag for a list like a table has. So I'd just give it an <Hx> (x depending on your previously used headers).

0

You can always use <label/> to associate label to your list element:

<div>
    <label for="list-2">TEST</label>
    <ul id="list-1">
        <li>one</li>
        <li>two</li>
        <li>three</li>
    </ul>
    <label for="list-2">TEST</label>
    <ol id="list-2">
        <li>one</li>
        <li>two</li>
        <li>three</li>
    </ul>
</div>

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