73

How can I output the value of an enum class in C++11? In C++03 it's like this:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

enum A {
  a = 1,
  b = 69,
  c= 666
};

int main () {
  A a = A::c;
  cout << a << endl;
}

in c++0x this code doesn't compile

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

enum class A {
  a = 1,
  b = 69,
  c= 666
};

int main () {
  A a = A::c;
  cout << a << endl;
}


prog.cpp:13:11: error: cannot bind 'std::ostream' lvalue to 'std::basic_ostream<char>&&'
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-pc-linux-gnu/4.5.1/../../../../include/c++/4.5.1/ostream:579:5: error:   initializing argument 1 of 'std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>&&, const _Tp&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Tp = A]'

compiled at Ideone.com

  • 1
    Why you're trying to output enum? enum class is used to don't mix up enum values with int representation – RiaD Jul 10 '12 at 20:31
99

Unlike an unscoped enumeration, a scoped enumeration is not implicitly convertible to its integer value. You need to explicitly convert it to an integer using a cast:

std::cout << static_cast<std::underlying_type<A>::type>(a) << std::endl;

You may want to encapsulate the logic into a function template:

template <typename Enumeration>
auto as_integer(Enumeration const value)
    -> typename std::underlying_type<Enumeration>::type
{
    return static_cast<typename std::underlying_type<Enumeration>::type>(value);
}

used as:

std::cout << as_integer(a) << std::endl;
  • 2
    Is there a reason this uses trailing return type syntax? – Nicol Bolas Jul 10 '12 at 20:41
  • 1
    @NicolBolas: I copied as_integer from one of my open-source libraries, CxxReflect (see enumeration.hpp). The library uses trailing return types consistently, everywhere. For consistency. – James McNellis Jul 10 '12 at 20:42
  • 8
    Although this is 2 years late, in case someone else sees this question you can just use the cast technique method above and simply call "static_cast<int>(value)" to get the integer or "static_cast<A>(intValue)" to get an enum value. Just bear in mind that going from int to enum or enum to enum can cause issues and generally is generally a sign of a design bug. – Benjamin Danger Johnson Apr 16 '14 at 21:23
  • 4
    int(value) and A(intValue) also work, without the ugly angle brackets. – Grault Dec 30 '14 at 6:42
  • 4
    as_integer can be defined to be constexpr so that it can be used in contexts where constant expression is needed. – Nawaz Apr 20 '15 at 9:21
34
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

using namespace std;

enum class A {
  a = 1,
  b = 69,
  c= 666
};

std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, const A& obj)
{
   os << static_cast<std::underlying_type<A>::type>(obj);
   return os;
}

int main () {
  A a = A::c;
  cout << a << endl;
}
  • I copied this example verbatim and compiled it as g++ -std=c++0x enum.cpp but I'm getting a bunch of compiler errors -> pastebin.com/JAtLXan9. I also couldn't get the example from @james-mcnellis to compile. – Dennis May 17 '13 at 23:18
  • 3
    @Dennis underlying_type is only in C++11 – Deqing Aug 8 '13 at 2:03
17

It is possible to get your second example (i.e., the one using a scoped enum) to work using the same syntax as unscoped enums. Furthermore, the solution is generic and will work for all scoped enums, versus writing code for each scoped enum (as shown in the answer provided by @ForEveR).

The solution is to write a generic operator<< function which will work for any scoped enum. The solution employs SFINAE via std::enable_if and is as follows.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

// Scoped enum
enum class Color
{
    Red,
    Green,
    Blue
};

// Unscoped enum
enum Orientation
{
    Horizontal,
    Vertical
};

// Another scoped enum
enum class ExecStatus
{
    Idle,
    Started,
    Running
};

template<typename T>
std::ostream& operator<<(typename std::enable_if<std::is_enum<T>::value, std::ostream>::type& stream, const T& e)
{
    return stream << static_cast<typename std::underlying_type<T>::type>(e);
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << Color::Blue << "\n";
    std::cout << Vertical << "\n";
    std::cout << ExecStatus::Running << "\n";
    return 0;
}
  • You need a typename before std::underlying_type<T>::type. – uckelman Feb 21 '15 at 14:39
  • @uckelman You're absolutely correct. Thanks for updating my answer. – James Adkison Feb 21 '15 at 14:44
  • this worked for me under clang, but under gcc 4.9.2, this solution fails when chaining << together, with the error error: cannot bind ‘std::basic_ostream<char>’ lvalue to ‘std::basic_ostream<char>&&’. this appears to be because when the stream is temporary, the ADL fails, and the above template is not a possibility. any tips? – ofloveandhate Sep 14 '15 at 21:15
  • @ofloveandhate Could you provide a link to an example that produces the issue? I tested the above code in gcc 4.9.2 without any problems and only a slight change, I converted the 3 cout statements into a single cout statement by chaining the << operators together. See here – James Adkison Sep 15 '15 at 0:04
  • let me revise my statement. I was trying to print an enum class contained inside a class, from outside that class. the code above does indeed work for enum classes not contained within a class themselves. – ofloveandhate Sep 15 '15 at 14:42
9

(I'm not allowed to comment yet.) I would suggest the following improvements to the already great answer of James McNellis:

template <typename Enumeration>
constexpr auto as_integer(Enumeration const value)
    -> typename std::underlying_type<Enumeration>::type
{
    static_assert(std::is_enum<Enumeration>::value, "parameter is not of type enum or enum class");
    return static_cast<typename std::underlying_type<Enumeration>::type>(value);
}

with

  • constexpr: allowing me to use an enum member value as compile-time array size
  • static_assert+is_enum: to 'ensure' compile-time that the function does sth. with enumerations only, as suggested

By the way I'm asking myself: Why should I ever use enum class when I would like to assign number values to my enum members?! Considering the conversion effort.

Perhaps I would then go back to ordinary enum as I suggested here: How to use enums as flags in C++?


Yet another (better) flavor of it without static_assert, based on a suggestion of @TobySpeight:

template <typename Enumeration>
constexpr std::enable_if_t<std::is_enum<Enumeration>::value,
std::underlying_type_t<Enumeration>> as_number(const Enumeration value)
{
    return static_cast<std::underlying_type_t<Enumeration>>(value);
}
  • Is there a type T for which std::underlying_type<T>::type exists, but std::is_enum<T>::value is false? If not, then the static_assert adds no value. – Toby Speight Feb 8 '17 at 8:40
  • 1
    I did not test on all compilers. But, @TobySpeight you are probably right, msvc2013 seems to spit out comprehensible error messages, suggesting a 1-to-1 correspondence between underlying_type_t existing and the type itself being enum. And static_assert isn't even fired. But: the reference says that the behavior of underlying_type is undefined if not provided with a complete enum type. So the static_assert is just a hope to get a maximum comprehensible message in case. Perhaps there are possibilities to force it getting processed earlier/earliest? – yau Feb 8 '17 at 10:15
  • Ah yes, you're right that it's undefined if Enumeration is not a complete enum type. In which case, it may already be too late, as it's used in the return type. Perhaps we could specify std::enable_if<std::is_enum<Enumeration>::value, std::underlying_type<Enumeration>::type> as the return type? Of course, it's so much easier (and the error messages so much clearer) if you have a compiler with support for Concepts... – Toby Speight Feb 8 '17 at 10:22
2

To write simpler,

enum class Color
{
    Red = 1,
    Green = 11,
    Blue = 111
};

int value = static_cast<int>(Color::Blue); // 111

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