29

How can we use jQuery .on() method with load event? e.g. The code is:

<a href="#" id="add">Add</a>
<div id="initial">
     <input type="text" class="abc" name="in">
</div>

And the jQuery for it:

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    var x=$('#initial').html();
    $('#add').click(function(){
        $('body').append(x);
    });
    $(document).on('load','.abc',function(){
        alert('started');
    });
});
3
  • and whats the question/ prob ? – Jashwant Jul 11 '12 at 3:45
  • I think the user may be asking this question where in his actual project the element .abc is dynamically created by external library. i.e. he has no control when the element .abc is appended to the DOM. – Ashwin Oct 10 '16 at 6:28
  • @Anand Mohan Sinha: This is where you went wrong --> $(document).on('load', '.abc', handler). Your selected answer is entirely about the .click() handler? How could you have accepted it as correct? – HoldOffHunger Dec 11 '17 at 21:47
24

Refer to http://api.jquery.com/on/

It says

In all browsers, the load, scroll, and error events (e.g., on an <img> element) do not bubble. In Internet Explorer 8 and lower, the paste and reset events do not bubble. Such events are not supported for use with delegation, but they can be used when the event handler is directly attached to the element generating the event.

If you want to do something when a new input box is added then you can simply write the code after appending it.

$('#add').click(function(){
        $('body').append(x);
        // Your code can be here
    });

And if you want the same code execute when the first input box within the document is loaded then you can write a function and call it in both places i.e. $('#add').click and document's ready event

2
  • 11
    It is a nice piece of info, but unfortunately irrelevant, imho. – Elliot Bonneville Jul 11 '12 at 3:45
  • 11
    How is this irrelevant? If the load event doesn't bubble up to the document level, this pretty much explains why you can't do a $(document).on("load", ".something", ...). On the contrary this is a pretty damn relevant answer. – md1337 Dec 11 '13 at 21:30
11

I'm not sure what you're going for here--by the time jQuery(document).ready() has executed, it has already loaded, and thus document's load event will already have been called. Attaching the load event handler at this point will have no effect and it will never be called. If you're attempting to alert "started" once the document has loaded, just put it right in the (document).ready() call, like this:

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    var x = $('#initial').html();
    $('#add').click(function() {
        $('body').append(x);
    });

    alert('started');

});​

If, as your code also appears to insinuate, you want to fire the alert when .abc has loaded, put it in an individual .load handler:

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    var x = $('#initial').html();
    $('#add').click(function() {
        $('body').append(x);
    });

    $(".abc").on("load", function() {
        alert('started');
    }
});​

Finally, I see little point in using jQuery in one place and $ in another. It's generally better to keep your code consistent, and either use jQuery everywhere or $ everywhere, as the two are generally interchangeable.

2
  • @Jashwant: Exactly. If ready has executed before the load event, attaching the load event to the document once ready has fired would be redundant. – Elliot Bonneville Jul 11 '12 at 3:44
  • 2
    @Imdad - jQuery 1.8 docs: ".load(handler(eventObject)) ... is a shortcut for .on('load', handler)." available from: August 2012, betas from June and I think under 1.7 it was available, so you can upvote – Jeffz Jul 8 '13 at 19:01
8

To run function onLoad

jQuery(window).on("load", function(){
    ..code..
});

To run code onDOMContentLoaded (also called onready)

jQuery(document).ready(function(){
    ..code..
});

or the recommended shorthand for onready

jQuery(function($){
    ..code.. ($ is the jQuery object)
});

onready fires when the document has loaded

onload fires when the document and all the associated content, like the images on the page have loaded.

0

As the other have mentioned, the load event does not bubble. Instead you can manually trigger a load-like event with a custom event:

$('#item').on('namespace/onload', handleOnload).trigger('namespace/onload')

If your element is already listening to a change event:

$('#item').on('change', handleChange).trigger('change')

I find this works well. Though, I stick to custom events to be more explicit and avoid side effects.

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