This is probably a very naive question.

I used to believe that a Throwable in Java always contains the stack trace. Is it correct? Now it looks like that I catch exceptions without the stack trace. Does it make sense? Is it possible to catch an exception without the stack trace?

  • 4
    What JVM? Environment? etc. Does this help? stackoverflow.com/questions/4659151/… – NG. Jul 11 '12 at 14:07
  • @SB. Yes, this does help. Thanks a lot. I have a very similar problem: I have a lot of exceptions (NPE). Method error of log4j logs some exceptions without the stack trace. – Michael Jul 11 '12 at 14:25
up vote 28 down vote accepted

It's possible to catch a Throwable object in Java without a stack trace:

Throwable(String message, Throwable cause, boolean enableSuppression,boolean writableStackTrace) 

Constructs a new throwable with the specified detail message, cause, suppression enabled or disabled, and writable stack trace enabled or disabled.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/Throwable.html

For Java 6:

As Java 6 doesn't have the Throwable(String message, Throwable cause, boolean enableSuppression,boolean writableStackTrace) constructor, we can suppress the stacktrace filling using below technique (borrowed from Scala, came to know from How slow are Java exceptions?)

class NoStackTraceRuntimeException extends RuntimeException {
    @Override
    public synchronized Throwable fillInStackTrace() {
        return this;
    }
}

Usage is same: throw new NoStackTraceRuntimeException (), or it's subtypes.

We can also do the same by extending Throwable:

class NoStackTraceThrowable extends Throwable {
    @Override
    public synchronized Throwable fillInStackTrace() {
        return this;
    }
}

But, a small catch is that you no longer can catch these exception using Exception as this is not subtype of Exception, instead should catch NoStackTraceThrowable or it's subtypes.

Update: For some interesting stats on performance in different usecases, check this SO question

  • did OP really mention java-6 in his question!!! – Am_I_Helpful Aug 15 '14 at 9:56
  • 4
    @shekharsuman No, but neither Java 7. This answer might help someone with Java 6 :) – manikanta Aug 15 '14 at 10:09
  • 2
    Even outside of Java 1.6, this is still a viable method. This will suppress the entire stack trace (as the passed in 'cause' of the 4 parameter constructor will be printed out). – DBK May 8 '15 at 13:17
  • I'm still using Java 6 here in 2016, so yeah :/ – Charles Wood Mar 23 '16 at 22:01
  • 1
    Your NoStackTraceThrowable could extend Exception instead (and be called NoStackTraceException) if you wanted it to be caught by a catch (Exception) block. – dimo414 Apr 3 '16 at 17:11

For Java 7+, here is an example of an exception where the stack trace can optionally be suppressed.

public class SuppressableStacktraceException extends Exception {

    private boolean suppressStacktrace = false;

    public SuppressableStacktraceException(String message, boolean suppressStacktrace) {
        super(message, null, suppressStacktrace, !suppressStacktrace);
        this.suppressStacktrace = suppressStacktrace;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        if (suppressStacktrace) {
            return getLocalizedMessage();
        } else {
            return super.toString();
        }
    }
}

This can be demonstrated with:

try {
    throw new SuppressableStacktraceException("Not suppressed", false);
} catch (SuppressableStacktraceException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
try {
    throw new SuppressableStacktraceException("Suppressed", true);
} catch (SuppressableStacktraceException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

This is based on the MLContextException from Apache SystemML, the code of which is available on GitHub at https://github.com/apache/systemml.

The easiest way to suppress the stacktrace on any Exception is

throwable.setStackTrace(new StackTraceElement[0]);

If the exception has a cause, you may need to do the same recursively.

This also reduces the costly creation of the stack trace, as much as possible

The stacktrace for a throwable is initialized in

Throwable#fillInStackTrace()

, which is called by any constructor and thus cannot be avoided. When the stacktrace actually is used, an StackTraceElement[] is lazily constructed in

Throwable#getOurStackTrace()

which only happens, if the field Throwable.stackTrace was not already set.

Setting the stacktrace to whatever non null value, avoids the construction of the StackTraceElement[] in Throwable#getOurStackTrace() and reduces the performance penalty as much as possible.

  • 2
    This works, but it doesn't solve the problem that most people want to solve by suppressing stack traces. Generating a stack trace is slow, and this can slow down code that uses exceptions a lot for messaging. To address this, one must prevent the creation of the stack traces, not delete them when they have already been created. - That said, your approach could still be useful to save memory when a lot of exceptions over which one has no control are stored for some reason. – Hans Adler Nov 4 '16 at 19:57
  • Halo @Hans Adler, I understand your concern, but I think my answer also reduces the costly creation of the stack trace, as much as possible.Please see my last edit. – Stefan Isele - prefabware.com Nov 6 '16 at 10:27

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