80

I have a list of dicts:

b = [{u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Utley, Alex', u'Total_Points': 96.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Russo, Brandon', u'Total_Points': 96.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Chappell, Justin', u'Total_Points': 96.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Foster, Toney', u'Total_Points': 80.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Lawson, Roman', u'Total_Points': 80.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Lempke, Sam', u'Total_Points': 80.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Gnezda, Alex', u'Total_Points': 78.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Kirks, Damien', u'Total_Points': 78.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Worden, Tom', u'Total_Points': 78.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Korecz, Mike', u'Total_Points': 78.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Swartz, Brian', u'Total_Points': 66.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Burgess, Randy', u'Total_Points': 66.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Smugala, Ryan', u'Total_Points': 66.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Harmon, Gary', u'Total_Points': 66.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Blasinsky, Scott', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Carter III, Laymon', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Coleman, Johnathan', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Venditti, Nick', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Blackwell, Devon', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Kovach, Alex', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Bolden, Antonio', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Smith, Ryan', u'Total_Points': 60.0}]

and I need to use a multi key sort reversed by Total_Points, then not reversed by TOT_PTS_Misc.

This can be done at the command prompt like so:

a = sorted(b, key=lambda d: (-d['Total_Points'], d['TOT_PTS_Misc']))

But I have to run this through a function, where I pass in the list and the sort keys. For example, def multikeysort(dict_list, sortkeys):.

How can the lambda line be used which will sort the list, for an arbitrary number of keys that are passed in to the multikeysort function, and take into consideration that the sortkeys may have any number of keys and those that need reversed sorts will be identified with a '-' before it?

66

This answer works for any kind of column in the dictionary -- the negated column need not be a number.

def multikeysort(items, columns):
    from operator import itemgetter
    comparers = [((itemgetter(col[1:].strip()), -1) if col.startswith('-') else
                  (itemgetter(col.strip()), 1)) for col in columns]
    def comparer(left, right):
        for fn, mult in comparers:
            result = cmp(fn(left), fn(right))
            if result:
                return mult * result
        else:
            return 0
    return sorted(items, cmp=comparer)

You can call it like this:

b = [{u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Utley, Alex', u'Total_Points': 96.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Russo, Brandon', u'Total_Points': 96.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Chappell, Justin', u'Total_Points': 96.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Foster, Toney', u'Total_Points': 80.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Lawson, Roman', u'Total_Points': 80.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Lempke, Sam', u'Total_Points': 80.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Gnezda, Alex', u'Total_Points': 78.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Kirks, Damien', u'Total_Points': 78.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Worden, Tom', u'Total_Points': 78.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Korecz, Mike', u'Total_Points': 78.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Swartz, Brian', u'Total_Points': 66.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Burgess, Randy', u'Total_Points': 66.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Smugala, Ryan', u'Total_Points': 66.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Harmon, Gary', u'Total_Points': 66.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Blasinsky, Scott', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Carter III, Laymon', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Coleman, Johnathan', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Venditti, Nick', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Blackwell, Devon', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Kovach, Alex', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Bolden, Antonio', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
     {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Smith, Ryan', u'Total_Points': 60.0}]

a = multikeysort(b, ['-Total_Points', 'TOT_PTS_Misc'])
for item in a:
    print item

Try it with either column negated. You will see the sort order reverse.

Next: change it so it does not use extra class....


2016-01-17

Taking my inspiration from this answer What is the best way to get the first item from an iterable matching a condition?, I shortened the code:

from operator import itemgetter as i

def multikeysort(items, columns):
    comparers = [
        ((i(col[1:].strip()), -1) if col.startswith('-') else (i(col.strip()), 1))
        for col in columns
    ]
    def comparer(left, right):
        comparer_iter = (
            cmp(fn(left), fn(right)) * mult
            for fn, mult in comparers
        )
        return next((result for result in comparer_iter if result), 0)
    return sorted(items, cmp=comparer)

In case you like your code terse.


Later 2016-01-17

This works with python3 (which eliminated the cmp argument to sort):

from operator import itemgetter as i
from functools import cmp_to_key

def multikeysort(items, columns):
    comparers = [
        ((i(col[1:].strip()), -1) if col.startswith('-') else (i(col.strip()), 1))
        for col in columns
    ]
    def comparer(left, right):
        comparer_iter = (
            cmp(fn(left), fn(right)) * mult
            for fn, mult in comparers
        )
        return next((result for result in comparer_iter if result), 0)
    return sorted(items, key=cmp_to_key(comparer))

Inspired by this answer How should I do custom sort in Python 3?

  • This works the best because I can use the reverse on any keys or columns. Thank you! – simi Jul 17 '09 at 17:10
  • So this does work well. I call my function with the list and string as parameters. I split the string first then call the multikeysort with the list and the list of keys from the split string. It does not matter which item in the string has the '-' at the start of the column name, because it will work with either item or all items. Awesome. Thank you. – simi Jul 17 '09 at 17:30
  • 2
    Thanks, you saved my day! – Sander van Leeuwen Jan 16 '14 at 15:15
  • 4
    cmp() isn't available for Python3, so I had to define it myself, as mentioned here: stackoverflow.com/a/22490617/398514 – pferate Feb 2 '16 at 19:03
  • 7
    @hughdbrown: You removed the cmp keyword, but the cmp() function is still used 4 lines above. I tried it with 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 and 3.5, they all failed at the function call, because cmp() is not defined. The third bullet here (docs.python.org/3.0/whatsnew/3.0.html#ordering-comparisons) mentions treating cmp() as gone. – pferate Feb 4 '16 at 16:58
34

I know this is a rather old question, but none of the answers mention that Python guarantees a stable sort order for its sorting routines such as list.sort() and sorted(), which means items that compare equal retain their original order.

This means that the equivalent of ORDER BY name ASC, age DESC (using SQL notation) for a list of dictionaries can be done like this:

items.sort(key=operator.itemgetter('age'), reverse=True)
items.sort(key=operator.itemgetter('name'))

The reversing/inverting works for all orderable types, not just numbers which you can negate by putting a minus sign in front.

And because of the Timsort algorithm used in (at least) CPython, this is actually rather fast in practice.

  • 2
    very nice. for moderate data sets where sorting the set multiple times doesn't matter, this is super cool! As you point out, you have to reverse the python sort compared to the sql sort. Thanks. – Greg Oct 13 '16 at 17:08
  • The second sort will break the result of the first. Funny that none of upvoters noticed it. – volcano Aug 6 '18 at 14:31
  • 4
    funny that you did not notice that the primary sort criterion goes last, as shown in my example, and explicitly mentioned in the other comment to make it very clear in case you did not notice. – wouter bolsterlee Aug 6 '18 at 19:14
33

This article has a nice rundown on various techniques for doing this. If your requirements are simpler than "full bidirectional multikey", take a look. It's clear the accepted answer and the blog post I just referenced influenced each other in some way, though I don't know which order.

In case the link dies here's a very quick synopsis of examples not covered above:

mylist = sorted(mylist, key=itemgetter('name', 'age'))
mylist = sorted(mylist, key=lambda k: (k['name'].lower(), k['age']))
mylist = sorted(mylist, key=lambda k: (k['name'].lower(), -k['age']))
  • As near as I can tell, stygianvision uses my code and gives no credit. Google for result = cmp(fn(left), fn(right)) – hughdbrown Aug 12 '14 at 20:50
  • 4
    Thanks for the synopsis, Link is actually dead now. :) – Amyth Dec 4 '15 at 7:56
24
def sortkeypicker(keynames):
    negate = set()
    for i, k in enumerate(keynames):
        if k[:1] == '-':
            keynames[i] = k[1:]
            negate.add(k[1:])
    def getit(adict):
       composite = [adict[k] for k in keynames]
       for i, (k, v) in enumerate(zip(keynames, composite)):
           if k in negate:
               composite[i] = -v
       return composite
    return getit

a = sorted(b, key=sortkeypicker(['-Total_Points', 'TOT_PTS_Misc']))
  • Wow! That is awesome. It works great. I am such a newbie that I feel I will never get to the point of knowing all this. That was fast too. Thank you very much. – simi Jul 17 '09 at 14:55
  • But, what if the keys sent to the sortkeypicker is a string, like so '-Total_Points,TOT_PTS_Misc'? – simi Jul 17 '09 at 15:17
  • 1
    Then you could split the string into an array first by calling some_string.split(",") – Jason Creighton Jul 17 '09 at 15:44
  • Thank you. I realized that I can do split of the string, after I already commented. DOH! – simi Jul 17 '09 at 16:52
  • But what if you negate the string value instead of the number value? I don't think that would work. – Nick Perkins May 14 '11 at 17:36
5

I use the following for sorting a 2d array on a number of columns

def k(a,b):
    def _k(item):
        return (item[a],item[b])
    return _k

This could be extended to work on an arbitrary number of items. I tend to think finding a better access pattern to your sortable keys is better than writing a fancy comparator.

>>> data = [[0,1,2,3,4],[0,2,3,4,5],[1,0,2,3,4]]
>>> sorted(data, key=k(0,1))
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 2, 3, 4, 5], [1, 0, 2, 3, 4]]
>>> sorted(data, key=k(1,0))
[[1, 0, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 2, 3, 4, 5]]
>>> sorted(a, key=k(2,0))
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [1, 0, 2, 3, 4], [0, 2, 3, 4, 5]]
1

I had a similar issue today - I had to sort dictionary items by descending numeric values and by ascending string values. To solve the issue of conflicting directions, I negated the integer values.

Here's a variant of my solution - as applicable to OP

sorted(b, key=lambda e: (-e['Total_Points'], e['TOT_PTS_Misc']))

Very simple - and works like a charm

[{'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Chappell, Justin', 'Total_Points': 96.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Russo, Brandon', 'Total_Points': 96.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Utley, Alex', 'Total_Points': 96.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Foster, Toney', 'Total_Points': 80.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Lawson, Roman', 'Total_Points': 80.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Lempke, Sam', 'Total_Points': 80.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Gnezda, Alex', 'Total_Points': 78.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Kirks, Damien', 'Total_Points': 78.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Korecz, Mike', 'Total_Points': 78.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Worden, Tom', 'Total_Points': 78.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Burgess, Randy', 'Total_Points': 66.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Harmon, Gary', 'Total_Points': 66.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Smugala, Ryan', 'Total_Points': 66.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Swartz, Brian', 'Total_Points': 66.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Blackwell, Devon', 'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Blasinsky, Scott', 'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Bolden, Antonio', 'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Carter III, Laymon', 'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Coleman, Johnathan', 'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Kovach, Alex', 'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Smith, Ryan', 'Total_Points': 60.0},
 {'TOT_PTS_Misc': 'Venditti, Nick', 'Total_Points': 60.0}]
0
from operator import itemgetter
from functools import partial

def _neg_itemgetter(key, d):
    return -d[key]

def key_getter(key_expr):
    keys = key_expr.split(",")
    getters = []
    for k in keys:
        k = k.strip()
        if k.startswith("-"):
           getters.append(partial(_neg_itemgetter, k[1:]))
        else:
           getters.append(itemgetter(k))

    def keyfunc(dct):
        return [kg(dct) for kg in getters]

    return keyfunc

def multikeysort(dict_list, sortkeys):
    return sorted(dict_list, key = key_getter(sortkeys)

Demonstration:

>>> multikeysort([{u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Utley, Alex', u'Total_Points': 60.0},
                 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Russo, Brandon', u'Total_Points': 96.0}, 
                 {u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Chappell, Justin', u'Total_Points': 96.0}],
                "-Total_Points,TOT_PTS_Misc")
[{u'Total_Points': 96.0, u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Chappell, Justin'}, 
 {u'Total_Points': 96.0, u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Russo, Brandon'}, 
 {u'Total_Points': 60.0, u'TOT_PTS_Misc': u'Utley, Alex'}]

The parsing is a bit fragile, but at least it allows for variable number of spaces between the keys.

  • But, when I have the second item in the string with a '-', it gives me a bad operand type for unary - error. – simi Jul 17 '09 at 16:57
  • You can't take the negative of a string. – Torsten Marek Jul 17 '09 at 17:14
  • Yes, I know, but this is how the parameters are passed in. Even if I do a split, one or the other will start with '-'. I think the sortkeys need to be split before calling key_getter, that way each item in the keys list will check the first character. Am I on the right track? – simi Jul 17 '09 at 17:26
0

Since you're already comfortable with lambda, here's a less verbose solution.

>>> def itemgetter(*names):
    return lambda mapping: tuple(-mapping[name[1:]] if name.startswith('-') else mapping[name] for name in names)

>>> itemgetter('a', '-b')({'a': 1, 'b': 2})
(1, -2)
  • This does not work. I have: values = ['-Total_Points', 'TOT_PTS_Misc'] then b as the list of dicts When I call g = itemgetter(values)(b) I get AttributeError: 'list' object has no attribute 'startswith' – simi Jul 17 '09 at 19:06
  • It takes a variable number of names, not a list of names. Call it like this: itemgetter(*values). Have a look at the similar builtin operator.itemgetter for another example. – A. Coady Jul 17 '09 at 19:14

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