4

I write this function for merging two arrays.

private static int[] Merge(int[] array1, int[] array2)
{
    var mergedArray = new int[array1.Length + array2.Length];
    int i = 0, j = 0, k = 0;
    while(k < mergedArray.Length)
    {
        if(i == array1.Length || j == array2.Length)
        {
             if (i <= j)
                {
                    mergedArray[k] = array1[i];
                    i++;
                }
                else
                {
                    mergedArray[k] = array2[j];
                    j++;
                }
        }
        else
        {
            if(array1[i] < array2[j])
            {
                mergedArray[k] = array1[i];
                i++;
            }
            else
            {
                mergedArray[k] = array2[j];
                j++;
            }
        }
        k++;
    }
    return mergedArray;
}

How to reduce if statements in this code?

9
  • This is not the same question. The merging here takes into account the values of the arrays, while the possible duplicate only concatenates two arrays. Jul 11, 2012 at 20:33
  • I think this does more than just merge. Maybe there some sorting going on (if(array1[i]<array2[j]).. statement). Can you please explain more what are you trying to do. Jul 11, 2012 at 20:33
  • 7
    "Is there a way to simplify this code?" --> codereview.stackexchange.com
    – CodeCaster
    Jul 11, 2012 at 20:36
  • 1
    Related stackoverflow.com/questions/9807701/… Jul 11, 2012 at 20:40
  • 1
    @Victor: Please provide an example set of arrays, and what the expected results are. The intent is not clear from the source what the Merge() function actually does. Jul 11, 2012 at 20:46

6 Answers 6

12

You can also make a Linq friendly version. This one is fast and will work on IEnumerable. You could easily translate this to any type T where T is IComparable.

    private static IEnumerable<int> Merge(IEnumerable<int> enum1, IEnumerable<int> enum2)
    {
        IEnumerator<int> e1 = enum1.GetEnumerator();
        IEnumerator<int> e2 = enum2.GetEnumerator();

        bool remaining1 = e1.MoveNext();
        bool remaining2 = e2.MoveNext();

        while (remaining1 || remaining2)
        {
            if (remaining1 && remaining2)
            {
                if (e1.Current > e2.Current)
                {
                    yield return e2.Current;
                    remaining2 = e2.MoveNext();
                }
                else
                {
                    yield return e1.Current;
                    remaining1 = e1.MoveNext();
                }
            }
            else if (remaining2)
            {
                yield return e2.Current;
                remaining2 = e2.MoveNext();
            }
            else
            {
                yield return e1.Current;
                remaining1 = e1.MoveNext();
            }
        }
    }
10

Not as good as the Linq solution, but if you want the traditional if-then style function you could write:

private static int[] Merge(int[] array1, int[] array2)
{
    var mergedArray = new int[array1.Length + array2.Length];
    int i = 0, j = 0, k = 0;
    while(k < mergedArray.Length)
    {
        if (j == array2.Length || ((i < array1.Length) && (array[i] < array2[j])))
        {
            mergedArray[k] = array1[i];
            i++;
        }
        else
        {
            mergedArray[k] = array2[j];
            j++;
        }
        k++;
    }
    return mergedArray;
}

(edit: missing brace added)

Or in English:

If array2 is empty or if there are still values in array 1 and array1[i] is less than array2[j], then take value from array1, otherwise take from array 2

Or very concise (just for fun):

private static int[] Merge(int[] array1, int[] array2)
{
    var mergedArray = new int[array1.Length + array2.Length];
    int i = 0, j = 0;
    while(i+j < mergedArray.Length)
        if (j == array2.Length || ((i < array1.Length) && (array1[i] < array2[j])))
            mergedArray[i+j] = array1[i++];
        else
            mergedArray[i+j] = array2[j++];
    return mergedArray;
}
5
  • This is much better than the Linq solution (you can measure the speed if you want). That said you must put the j == array2.Length test at the beginning of your test. ie if (j == array2.Length || ((i < array1.Length) && (array[i] < array2[j]))) otherwise, array2[j] could throw an exception
    – d--b
    Jul 11, 2012 at 20:57
  • Would this also assume that the two arrays passed in as parameters are already ordered? Jul 11, 2012 at 21:11
  • @ErikPhilips the question asker assumes so, yes
    – jcolebrand
    Jul 11, 2012 at 21:12
  • @jcolebrand I feel like i'm blind, where did he mention the arrays are pre-sorted? Jul 11, 2012 at 21:14
  • the title How to optimize function for merging sorted arrays in C#
    – jcolebrand
    Jul 11, 2012 at 21:17
4

Linq is your friend, here is one way:

private static int[] Merge(int[] array1, int[] array2)
{
  List<int> merged = new List<int>(array1.Length + array2.Length);
  merged.AddRange(array1);
  merged.AddRange(array2);
  return merged.GroupBy(x => x)
               .Select(x => x.Key)
               .OrderBy(x => x)
               .ToArray();
}
6
  • Array.Copy(array1, newArray, array1.Length);
    – BILL
    Jul 11, 2012 at 20:45
  • I think that arrays more faster than Lists
    – BILL
    Jul 11, 2012 at 20:48
  • @Victor You can entirely avoid copy if you yous array1.Concat(array2) instead of merge. Linq consumes anyway 'IEnumerable' so the Concat will first enumerate through array1 and then through array2. Jul 11, 2012 at 20:53
  • 1
    @Victor if the two arrays can contain the same values, this solution removes the duplicates. So while your Merge(new [] {2,3,4}, new [] {4,5,6}) will results in 2,3,4,4,5,6 until Erik's solution results in 2,3,4,5,6
    – nemesv
    Jul 11, 2012 at 20:55
  • 2
    @Victor By the way is avoiding conditionals really your ultimative goal? You solution has O(n) time - with proposed Linq you will get O(n log(n)) because it involves OrderBy. Are you really happy with the trade-off? Jul 11, 2012 at 20:57
2

Rather than being specific to arrays, I'd suggest looking at the following question for a number of different answers for IEnumerable<T>. Most efficient algorithm for merging sorted IEnumerable<T>

The answer I provided at https://stackoverflow.com/a/14444706/184528 has only one if statement and merge multiple enumerables.

For example to use it to merge three different arrays:

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var xs = new[] { 1, 5, 9 };
        var ys = new[] { 2, 7, 8 };
        var zs = new[] { 0, 3, 4, 6 };

        foreach (var a in new [] { xs, ys, zs }.Merge())
            Console.WriteLine(a);
    }
0

It seems to me that this is the most "reduced" version of the function:

private static int[] Merge(int[] array1, int[] array2)
{
    return array1.Concat(array2).OrderBy(x => x).ToArray();
}

It can't get much simpler than this. Not one if remaining.

I ran this Merge(new [] { 1, 2, 2, 3 }, new [] { 1, 1, 2, 4, }) on both the original code and my solution and got the same answer.

-1

How about using Queue<int> to drain the arrays:

    private static int[] Merge(int[] array1, int[] array2)
    {
        int N=array1.Length+array2.Length;
        Queue<int> Q1=new Queue<int>(array1);
        Queue<int> Q2=new Queue<int>(array2);
        Queue<int> result=new Queue<int>(N);

        for(int k=0; k<N; k++)
        {
            if(Q1.Count==0)
            {
                result.Enqueue(Q2.Dequeue());
            }
            else if(Q2.Count==0)
            {
                result.Enqueue(Q1.Dequeue());
            }
            else
            {
                result.Enqueue(
                    Q1.Peek()<Q2.Peek()?
                    Q1.Dequeue():
                    Q2.Dequeue());
            }
        }
        return result.ToArray();
    }
1
  • 1
    You are copying arrays at least 3 times. Jul 11, 2012 at 21:12

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