26

I'm trying to write a context manager that uses other context managers, so clients don't need to know the whole recipe, just the interface I'm presenting. I can't do it using @contextmanager - the code after yield call doesn't get executed if you're interrupted by an exception, so I need to use a class-based manager.

Here's a little example script:

from contextlib import contextmanager
import pprint

d = {}

@contextmanager
def simple(arg, val):
    print "enter", arg
    d[arg] = val
    yield
    print "exit", arg
    del d[arg]

class compl(object):
    def __init__(self, arg, val):
        self.arg=arg
        self.val=val

    def __enter__(self):
        with simple("one",1):
            with simple("two",2):
                print "enter complex", self.arg
                d[self.arg] = self.val

    def __exit__(self,*args):
        print "exit complex", self.arg
        del d[self.arg]

print "before"
print d
print ""

with compl("three",3):
    print d
    print ""

print "after"
print d
print ""

That outputs this:

before
{}

enter one
enter two
enter complex three
exit two
exit one
{'three': 3}

exit complex three
after
{}

I want it to output this:

before
{}

enter one
enter two
enter complex three
{'one': 1, 'three': 3, 'two': 2}

exit complex three
exit two
exit one
after
{}

Is there any way to tell a class-based context manager to wrap itself with other context managers?

4
  • 2
    It'd be useful to specify Python version. Commented Jul 11, 2012 at 20:40
  • Excuse the question, but why would you want to do this? It seems only natural to me that the class-based context manager should exit last, after it's cleaned up its dependencies.
    – Fred Foo
    Commented Jul 11, 2012 at 20:44
  • My use case is a login context manager for testing a view (in a webapp). Logging in requires a couple of calls to mock, which occur via a with statement. I want users of this helper logIn context manager to just be able to call the login manager without having to also know what to mock. The outer CMs need their context to persist through the block passed to the login CM, so they can't expire in the login's enter method. Commented Jul 12, 2012 at 2:52
  • This is very convoluted question. Commented Jan 29, 2021 at 8:05

4 Answers 4

24
@contextmanager
def compl(arg, val):
    with simple("one",1):
        with simple("two",2):
            print "enter complex", arg 
            try:
                d[arg] = val
                yield
            finally:
                del d[arg]
                print "exit complex", arg
2
  • 6
    Could you pinpoint/explain what was the problem in asker's code so it's faster to comprehend what's going on? :)
    – n611x007
    Commented Oct 24, 2013 at 15:56
  • 1
    @naxa: look at the last two output examples in the question. The code in the question produces the first output, my code in the answer produces the second one (the desirable one). In a nutshell: the most nested context manager should exit the soonest.
    – jfs
    Commented Oct 24, 2013 at 16:08
14

In case you're seeing this answer based on the wording of the question, here's a summary of the solution

@contextmanager
def your_custom_context_manager():
    with open(...) as f:
       # do your thing here, e.g. have an `if` statement, or another `with` statement
       yield f  # this is where your new context manager will start from


with your_custom_context_manager() as f:
    # do your stuff
2
  • 1
    Should've been the answer.
    – LinPy fan
    Commented Feb 27, 2023 at 14:53
  • For async context managers use asynccontextmanager.
    – Pirulax
    Commented Apr 2 at 21:15
11

You write, "I can't do it using @contextmanager - the code after yield call doesn't get executed if you're interrupted by an exception." If you have code that must run you can put it in a try/finally block.

import contextlib

@contextlib.contextmanager
def internal_cm():
    try:
        print "Entering internal_cm"
        yield None
        print "Exiting cleanly from internal_cm"
    finally:
        print "Finally internal_cm"

@contextlib.contextmanager
def external_cm():
    with internal_cm() as c:
        try:
            print "In external_cm_f"
            yield [c]
            print "Exiting cleanly from external_cm_f"
        finally:
            print "Finally external_cm_f"

if "__main__" == __name__:
    with external_cm() as foo1:
        print "Location A"
    print
    with external_cm() as foo2:
        print "Location B"
        raise Exception("Some exception occurs!!")

Output:

Entering internal_cm
In external_cm_f
Location A
Exiting cleanly from external_cm_f
Finally external_cm_f
Exiting cleanly from internal_cm
Finally internal_cm

Entering internal_cm
In external_cm_f
Location B
Finally external_cm_f
Finally internal_cm
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "C:\Anaconda\lib\site-packages\spyderlib\widgets\externalshell\sitecustomize.py", line 540, in runfile
    execfile(filename, namespace)
  File "C:\untitled0.py", line 35, in <module>
    raise Exception("Some exception occurs!!")
Exception: Some exception occurs!!
2

The trouble with what you're doing, is that in using with in your __enter__ call, when you enter your wrapping context manager, you both enter and then leaving the wrapped context managers. If you want write your own context manager that enters the wrapped context managers when you enter the wrapper, then exits them when you leave, you'll have to manually invoke the wrapped context managers' functions. You'll probably also still have to worry about exception safety.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.