I saw many questions about this, and tried to solve the problem, but after one hour of googling and a lots of trial & error, I still can't fix it. I hope some of you catch the problem.

This is what I get:

java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Comparison method violates its general contract!
    at java.util.ComparableTimSort.mergeHi(ComparableTimSort.java:835)
    at java.util.ComparableTimSort.mergeAt(ComparableTimSort.java:453)
    at java.util.ComparableTimSort.mergeForceCollapse(ComparableTimSort.java:392)
    at java.util.ComparableTimSort.sort(ComparableTimSort.java:191)
    at java.util.ComparableTimSort.sort(ComparableTimSort.java:146)
    at java.util.Arrays.sort(Arrays.java:472)
    at java.util.Collections.sort(Collections.java:155)
    ...

And this is my comparator:

@Override
public int compareTo(Object o) {
    if(this == o){
        return 0;
    }

    CollectionItem item = (CollectionItem) o;

    Card card1 = CardCache.getInstance().getCard(cardId);
    Card card2 = CardCache.getInstance().getCard(item.getCardId());

    if (card1.getSet() < card2.getSet()) {
        return -1;
    } else {
        if (card1.getSet() == card2.getSet()) {
            if (card1.getRarity() < card2.getRarity()) {
                return 1;
            } else {
                if (card1.getId() == card2.getId()) {
                    if (cardType > item.getCardType()) {
                        return 1;
                    } else {
                        if (cardType == item.getCardType()) {
                            return 0;
                        }
                        return -1;
                    }
                }
                return -1;
            }
        }
        return 1;
    }
}

Any idea?

  • What line of code causes this Exception to be thrown? What's on lines 835 and 453 of ComparableTimSort.java? – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 11 '12 at 21:23
  • It seems to me that you should have this method delegate to the Card class: return card1.compareTo(card2) and implement this logic there. – Hunter McMillen Jul 11 '12 at 21:24
  • 2
    @HovercraftFullOfEels It's a class from Oracle, not wroted by me. It's thows an exception on that line. The method is very long and looks hard to understand. – Lakatos Gyula Jul 11 '12 at 21:32
  • @HunterMcMillen I can't do that. Card only contains the static data of a card (name, text etc...) while this class contains some changing variables like type and amount. – Lakatos Gyula Jul 11 '12 at 21:34
  • I really wonder what makes you to write such a weird asymmetrical and unreadable compareTo??? – maaartinus Sep 1 '14 at 14:24
up vote 69 down vote accepted

The exception message is actually pretty descriptive. The contract it mentions is transitivity: if A > B and B > C then for any A, B and C: A > C. I checked it with paper and pencil and your code seems to have few holes:

if (card1.getRarity() < card2.getRarity()) {
  return 1;

you do not return -1 if card1.getRarity() > card2.getRarity().


if (card1.getId() == card2.getId()) {
  //...
}
return -1;

You return -1 if ids aren't equal. You should return -1 or 1 depending on which id was bigger.


Take a look at this. Apart from being much more readable, I think it should actually work:

if (card1.getSet() > card2.getSet()) {
    return 1;
}
if (card1.getSet() < card2.getSet()) {
    return -1;
};
if (card1.getRarity() < card2.getRarity()) {
    return 1;
}
if (card1.getRarity() > card2.getRarity()) {
    return -1;
}
if (card1.getId() > card2.getId()) {
    return 1;
}
if (card1.getId() < card2.getId()) {
    return -1;
}
return cardType - item.getCardType();  //watch out for overflow!
  • 13
    Actually, the example you given does not violate transitivity, but the rule sgn(compare(x, y)) == -sgn(compare(y, x)) as stated in docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/… - that's antisymmetry in mathematical terms. – Hans-Peter Störr Jul 25 '14 at 6:40
  • 1
    I'd suggest to use if (card1.getSet() != card2.getSet()) return card1.getSet() > card2.getSet() ? 1 : -1; for more speed, if someone cares. – maaartinus Sep 1 '14 at 14:22
  • I encountered this and it was a symmetry issue in my Comparator. The hard part to diagnose was that my weakness was the first field (a boolean field check, not a proper comparison) which did not check for both being true correct. This was only exposed, however, after I added a subsequent subordinate comparison which must have perturbed the sort order. – Thomas W Oct 13 '16 at 1:42
  • 1
    @maaartinus thanks for your suggestion! It was perfect for me :) – Sonhja Mar 29 '17 at 7:50

It also has something to do with the version of JDK. If it does well in JDK6, maybe it will have the problem in JDK 7 described by you, because the implementation method in jdk 7 has been changed.

Look at this:

Description: The sorting algorithm used by java.util.Arrays.sort and (indirectly) by java.util.Collections.sort has been replaced. The new sort implementation may throw an IllegalArgumentException if it detects a Comparable that violates the Comparable contract. The previous implementation silently ignored such a situation. If the previous behavior is desired, you can use the new system property, java.util.Arrays.useLegacyMergeSort, to restore previous mergesort behaviour.

I don't know the exact reason. However, if you add the code before you use sort. It will be OK.

System.setProperty("java.util.Arrays.useLegacyMergeSort", "true");
  • The problem was in the logic I used to compare things. I will upvoted this, hopefuly it can help someone who's looking for this type of problem. – Lakatos Gyula Nov 27 '13 at 11:14
  • 8
    That should only be used as a quick and ugly workaround to make things work again until you fix the comparator. If the exception happens it means you comparator is buggy and the sort order will be weird. You have to consider all the rules given in docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/… . – Hans-Peter Störr Jul 25 '14 at 6:42
  • What if "weird" is what I was going for? (a,b) -> { return (new int[]{-1,1})[(int)((Math.random()*2)%2)]} I know Collections.shuffle exists, but I dislike being over-protected. – Jefferey Cave Jan 15 '16 at 23:11

You can use the following class to pinpoint transitivity bugs in your Comparators:

/**
 * @author Gili Tzabari
 */
public final class Comparators
{
    /**
     * Verify that a comparator is transitive.
     *
     * @param <T>        the type being compared
     * @param comparator the comparator to test
     * @param elements   the elements to test against
     * @throws AssertionError if the comparator is not transitive
     */
    public static <T> void verifyTransitivity(Comparator<T> comparator, Collection<T> elements)
    {
        for (T first: elements)
        {
            for (T second: elements)
            {
                int result1 = comparator.compare(first, second);
                int result2 = comparator.compare(second, first);
                if (result1 != -result2)
                {
                    // Uncomment the following line to step through the failed case
                    //comparator.compare(first, second);
                    throw new AssertionError("compare(" + first + ", " + second + ") == " + result1 +
                        " but swapping the parameters returns " + result2);
                }
            }
        }
        for (T first: elements)
        {
            for (T second: elements)
            {
                int firstGreaterThanSecond = comparator.compare(first, second);
                if (firstGreaterThanSecond <= 0)
                    continue;
                for (T third: elements)
                {
                    int secondGreaterThanThird = comparator.compare(second, third);
                    if (secondGreaterThanThird <= 0)
                        continue;
                    int firstGreaterThanThird = comparator.compare(first, third);
                    if (firstGreaterThanThird <= 0)
                    {
                        // Uncomment the following line to step through the failed case
                        //comparator.compare(first, third);
                        throw new AssertionError("compare(" + first + ", " + second + ") > 0, " +
                            "compare(" + second + ", " + third + ") > 0, but compare(" + first + ", " + third + ") == " +
                            firstGreaterThanThird);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Prevent construction.
     */
    private Comparators()
    {
    }
}

Simply invoke Comparators.verifyTransitivity(myComparator, myCollection) in front of the code that fails.

  • 1
    This code validates compare(a,b) = - compare(b, c). It does not check that if compare(a,b) > 0 && compare(b,c) > 0 then compare(a,c) > 0 – Olaf Achthoven Feb 15 '16 at 13:42
  • @OlafAchthoven Good catch. Answer updated. – Gili Feb 15 '16 at 17:16
  • 3
    I really found your class very, very useful. Thanks. – crigore Jul 27 '16 at 10:34
  • Thank you, I had to come back and upvote the answer as this class is very useful when debugging a comparator, not just for the purpose mentioned here as it can be changed to test other circumstances as well! – Jaco-Ben Vosloo Nov 22 '17 at 13:04
  • The code very useful. Thanks! – Beno Arakelyan Apr 13 at 20:38

Consider the following case:

First, o1.compareTo(o2) is called. card1.getSet() == card2.getSet() happens to be true and so is card1.getRarity() < card2.getRarity(), so you return 1.

Then, o2.compareTo(o1) is called. Again, card1.getSet() == card2.getSet() is true. Then, you skip to the following else, then card1.getId() == card2.getId() happens to be true, and so is cardType > item.getCardType(). You return 1 again.

From that, o1 > o2, and o2 > o1. You broke the contract.

        if (card1.getRarity() < card2.getRarity()) {
            return 1;

However, if card2.getRarity() is less than card1.getRarity() you might not return -1.

You similarly miss other cases. I would do this, you can change around depending on your intent:

public int compareTo(Object o) {    
    if(this == o){
        return 0;
    }

    CollectionItem item = (CollectionItem) o;

    Card card1 = CardCache.getInstance().getCard(cardId);
    Card card2 = CardCache.getInstance().getCard(item.getCardId());
    int comp=card1.getSet() - card2.getSet();
    if (comp!=0){
        return comp;
    }
    comp=card1.getRarity() - card2.getRarity();
    if (comp!=0){
        return comp;
    }
    comp=card1.getSet() - card2.getSet();
    if (comp!=0){
        return comp;
    }   
    comp=card1.getId() - card2.getId();
    if (comp!=0){
        return comp;
    }   
    comp=card1.getCardType() - card2.getCardType();

    return comp;

    }
}

I had to sort on several criterion (date, and, if same date; other things...). What was working on Eclipse with an older version of Java, did not worked any more on Android : comparison method violates contract ...

After reading on StackOverflow, I wrote a separate function that I called from compare() if the dates are the same. This function calculates the priority, according to the criteria, and returns -1, 0, or 1 to compare(). It seems to work now.

I got the same error with a class like the following StockPickBean. Called from this code:

List<StockPickBean> beansListcatMap.getValue();
beansList.sort(StockPickBean.Comparators.VALUE);

public class StockPickBean implements Comparable<StockPickBean> {
    private double value;
    public double getValue() { return value; }
    public void setValue(double value) { this.value = value; }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(StockPickBean view) {
        return Comparators.VALUE.compare(this,view); //return 
        Comparators.SYMBOL.compare(this,view);
    }

    public static class Comparators {
        public static Comparator<StockPickBean> VALUE = (val1, val2) -> 
(int) 
         (val1.value - val2.value);
    }
}

After getting the same error:

java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Comparison method violates its general contract!

I changed this line:

public static Comparator<StockPickBean> VALUE = (val1, val2) -> (int) 
         (val1.value - val2.value);

to:

public static Comparator<StockPickBean> VALUE = (StockPickBean spb1, 
StockPickBean spb2) -> Double.compare(spb2.value,spb1.value);

That fixes the error.

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