I am trying to display a live word count in the vim statusline. I do this by setting my status line in my .vimrc and inserting a function into it. The idea of this function is to return the number of words in the current buffer. This number is then displayed on the status line. This should work nicely as the statusline is updated at just about every possible opportunity so the count will always remain 'live'.

The problem is that the function I have currently defined is slow and so vim is obviously sluggish when it is used for all but the smallest files; due to this function being executed so frequently.

In summary, does anyone have a clever trick for producing a function that is blazingly fast at calculating the number of words in the current buffer and returning the result?

  • What is your current function? – Michael Haren Sep 22 '08 at 11:59
  • 11
    For others coming here for a general word count, use g Ctrl-g. – naught101 May 19 '14 at 5:27

13 Answers 13

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Here's a usable version of Rodrigo Queiro's idea. It doesn't change the status bar, and it restores the statusmsg variable.

function WordCount()
  let s:old_status = v:statusmsg
  exe "silent normal g\<c-g>"
  let s:word_count = str2nr(split(v:statusmsg)[11])
  let v:statusmsg = s:old_status
  return s:word_count
endfunction

This seems to be fast enough to include directly in the status line, e.g.:

:set statusline=wc:%{WordCount()}
  • s/s://g ; or s/s:/l:/g if you really want an explicit scope. – Luc Hermitte May 10 '10 at 10:05
  • 4
    FWIW, this does not work with Vim 7.3 on Ubuntu 12.04. I can't append to the end of the line! That is, both "A" and "a" (the latter while on the last character in a line) do not leave the cursor beyond the last character, but directly in front of it. I can't imagine why. – chreekat Nov 1 '12 at 20:22

I really like Michael Dunn's answer above but I found that when I was editing it was causing me to be unable to access the last column. So I have a minor change for the function:

function! WordCount()
   let s:old_status = v:statusmsg
   let position = getpos(".")
   exe ":silent normal g\<c-g>"
   let stat = v:statusmsg
   let s:word_count = 0
   if stat != '--No lines in buffer--'
     let s:word_count = str2nr(split(v:statusmsg)[11])
     let v:statusmsg = s:old_status
   end
   call setpos('.', position)
   return s:word_count 
endfunction

I've included it in my status line without any issues:

:set statusline=wc:%{WordCount()}

  • Alas, this should be the accepted solution. :) – chreekat Nov 1 '12 at 20:25
  • 2
    There is a small typo here. The line below the first bolded line should read exe ":silent normal g\<c-g>" instead. – Jack Franklin Jul 15 '14 at 14:39
  • 1
    @JackFranklin It wasn't a typo. The OP had used hand-coded HTML in his Markdown (to produce bold within a section of code), and SO's rendering engine responded badly. I've removed the HTML to fix the problem. Thanks for noting that the code seemed wrong. – Telemachus Nov 1 '15 at 16:53

Keep a count for the current line and a separate count for the rest of the buffer. As you type (or delete) words on the current line, update only that count, but display the sum of the current line count and the rest of the buffer count.

When you change lines, add the current line count to the buffer count, count the words in the current line and a) set the current line count and b) subtract it from the buffer count.

It would also be wise to recount the buffer periodically (note that you don't have to count the whole buffer at once, since you know where editing is occurring).

This will recalculate the number of words whenever you stop typing for a while (specifically, updatetime ms).

let g:word_count="<unknown>"
fun! WordCount()
    return g:word_count
endfun
fun! UpdateWordCount()
    let s = system("wc -w ".expand("%p"))
    let parts = split(s, ' ')
    if len(parts) > 1
        let g:word_count = parts[0]
    endif
endfun

augroup WordCounter
    au! CursorHold * call UpdateWordCount()
    au! CursorHoldI * call UpdateWordCount()
augroup END

" how eager are you? (default is 4000 ms)
set updatetime=500

" modify as you please...
set statusline=%{WordCount()}\ words

Enjoy!

So I've written:

func CountWords()
    exe "normal g\"
    let words = substitute(v:statusmsg, "^.*Word [^ ]* of ", "", "")
    let words = substitute(words, ";.*", "", "")
    return words
endfunc

But it prints out info to the statusbar, so I don't think it will be suitable for your use-case. It's very fast, though!

I used a slightly different approach for this. Rather than make sure the word count function is especially fast, I only call it when the cursor stops moving. These commands will do it:

:au CursorHold * exe "normal g\<c-g>"
:au CursorHoldI * exe "normal g\<c-g>"

Perhaps not quite what the questioner wanted, but much simpler than some of the answers here, and good enough for my use-case (glance down to see word count after typing a sentence or two).

Setting updatetime to a smaller value also helps here:

set updatetime=300

There isn't a huge overhead polling for the word count because CursorHold and CursorHoldI only fire once when the cursor stops moving, not every updatetime ms.

  • I tried many functions on this page but found this 3-line answer to be the only one working in my Gvim (version 8.0.550) on LInux. – rnso Aug 30 '17 at 17:40

Here is a refinement of Abslom Daak's answer that also works in visual mode.

function! WordCount()
  let s:old_status = v:statusmsg
  let position = getpos(".")
  exe ":silent normal g\<c-g>"
  let stat = v:statusmsg
  let s:word_count = 0
  if stat != '--No lines in buffer--'
    if stat =~ "^Selected"
      let s:word_count = str2nr(split(v:statusmsg)[5])
    else
      let s:word_count = str2nr(split(v:statusmsg)[11])
    end
    let v:statusmsg = s:old_status
  end
  call setpos('.', position)
  return s:word_count 
endfunction

Included in the status line as before. Here is a right-aligned status line:

set statusline=%=%{WordCount()}\ words\

I took the bulk of this from the vim help pages on writing functions.

function! WordCount()
  let lnum = 1
  let n = 0
  while lnum <= line('$')
    let n = n + len(split(getline(lnum)))
    let lnum = lnum + 1
  endwhile
  return n
endfunction

Of course, like the others, you'll need to:

:set statusline=wc:%{WordCount()}

I'm sure this can be cleaned up by somebody to make it more vimmy (s:n instead of just n?), but I believe the basic functionality is there.

Edit:

Looking at this again, I really like Mikael Jansson's solution. I don't like shelling out to wc (not portable and perhaps slow). If we replace his UpdateWordCount function with the code I have above (renaming my function to UpdateWordCount), then I think we have a better solution.

  • Local variables should remain local. s: variables are script-local global variables, like static variables in C. If you want, you could use +=. You can also do a :foreach on getline(1,'$'), but I don't know which solution is faster. – Luc Hermitte May 10 '10 at 10:01

My suggestion:

function! UpdateWordCount()
  let b:word_count = eval(join(map(getline("1", "$"), "len(split(v:val, '\\s\\+'))"), "+"))
endfunction

augroup UpdateWordCount
  au!
  autocmd BufRead,BufNewFile,BufEnter,CursorHold,CursorHoldI,InsertEnter,InsertLeave * call UpdateWordCount()
augroup END

let &statusline='wc:%{get(b:, "word_count", 0)}'

I'm not sure how this compares in speed to some of the other solutions, but it's certainly a lot simpler than most.

I'm new to Vim scripting, but I might suggest

function WordCount()
    redir => l:status
    exe "silent normal g\<c-g>"
    redir END
    return str2nr(split(l:status)[11])
endfunction

as being a bit cleaner since it does not overwrite the existing status line.

My reason for posting is to point out that this function has a puzzling bug: namely, it breaks the append command. Hitting A should drop you into insert mode with the cursor positioned to the right of the final character on the line. However, with this custom status bar enabled it will put you to the left of the final character.

Anyone have any idea what causes this?

This is an improvement on Michael Dunn's version, caching the word count so even less processing is needed.

function! WC()
    if &modified || !exists("b:wordcount") 
            let l:old_status = v:statusmsg  
            execute "silent normal g\<c-g>"
            let b:wordcount = str2nr(split(v:statusmsg)[11])
            let v:statusmsg = l:old_status  
            return b:wordcount
    else
            return b:wordcount
    endif
endfunction 

Using the method in the answer provided by Steve Moyer I was able to produce the following solution. It is a rather inelegant hack I'm afraid and I feel that there must be a neater solution, but it works, and is much faster than simply counting all of the words in a buffer every time the status line is updated. I should note also that this solution is platform independent and does not assume a system has 'wc' or something similar.

My solution does not periodically update the buffer, but the answer provided by Mikael Jansson would be able to provide this functionality. I have not, as of yet, found an instance where my solution becomes out of sync. However I have only tested this briefly as an accurate live word count is not essential to my needs. The pattern I use for matching words is also simple and is intended for simple text documents. If anyone has a better idea for a pattern or any other suggestions please feel free to post an answer or edit this post.

My solution:

"returns the count of how many words are in the entire file excluding the current line 
"updates the buffer variable Global_Word_Count to reflect this
fu! OtherLineWordCount() 
    let data = []
    "get lines above and below current line unless current line is first or last
    if line(".") > 1
        let data = getline(1, line(".")-1)
    endif   
    if line(".") < line("$")
        let data = data + getline(line(".")+1, "$") 
    endif   
    let count_words = 0
    let pattern = "\\<\\(\\w\\|-\\|'\\)\\+\\>"
    for str in data
        let count_words = count_words + NumPatternsInString(str, pattern)
    endfor  
    let b:Global_Word_Count = count_words
    return count_words
endf    

"returns the word count for the current line
"updates the buffer variable Current_Line_Number 
"updates the buffer variable Current_Line_Word_Count 
fu! CurrentLineWordCount()
    if b:Current_Line_Number != line(".") "if the line number has changed then add old count
        let b:Global_Word_Count = b:Global_Word_Count + b:Current_Line_Word_Count
    endif   
    "calculate number of words on current line
    let line = getline(".")
    let pattern = "\\<\\(\\w\\|-\\|'\\)\\+\\>"
    let count_words = NumPatternsInString(line, pattern)
    let b:Current_Line_Word_Count = count_words "update buffer variable with current line count
    if b:Current_Line_Number != line(".") "if the line number has changed then subtract current line count
        let b:Global_Word_Count = b:Global_Word_Count - b:Current_Line_Word_Count
    endif   
    let b:Current_Line_Number = line(".") "update buffer variable with current line number
    return count_words
endf    

"returns the word count for the entire file using variables defined in other procedures
"this is the function that is called repeatedly and controls the other word
"count functions.
fu! WordCount()
    if exists("b:Global_Word_Count") == 0 
        let b:Global_Word_Count = 0
        let b:Current_Line_Word_Count = 0
        let b:Current_Line_Number = line(".")
        call OtherLineWordCount()
    endif   
    call CurrentLineWordCount()
    return b:Global_Word_Count + b:Current_Line_Word_Count
endf

"returns the number of patterns found in a string 
fu! NumPatternsInString(str, pat)
    let i = 0
    let num = -1
    while i != -1
        let num = num + 1
        let i = matchend(a:str, a:pat, i)
    endwhile
    return num
endf

This is then added to the status line by:

:set statusline=wc:%{WordCount()}

I hope this helps anyone looking for a live word count in Vim. Albeit one that isn't always exact. Alternatively of course g ctrl-g will provide you with Vim's word count!

In case someone else is coming here from Google, I modified Abslom Daak's answer to work with Airline. I saved the following as

~/.vim/bundle/vim-airline/autoload/airline/extensions/pandoc.vim

and added

call airline#extensions#pandoc#init(s:ext)

to extensions.vim

let s:spc = g:airline_symbols.space

function! airline#extensions#pandoc#word_count()
if mode() == "s"
    return 0
else
    let s:old_status = v:statusmsg
    let position = getpos(".")
    let s:word_count = 0
    exe ":silent normal g\<c-g>"
    let stat = v:statusmsg
    let s:word_count = 0
    if stat != '--No lines in buffer--'
        let s:word_count = str2nr(split(v:statusmsg)[11])
        let v:statusmsg = s:old_status
    end
    call setpos('.', position)
    return s:word_count 
end
endfunction

function! airline#extensions#pandoc#apply(...)
if &ft == "pandoc"
    let w:airline_section_x = "%{airline#extensions#pandoc#word_count()} Words"
endif
endfunction

function! airline#extensions#pandoc#init(ext)
call a:ext.add_statusline_func('airline#extensions#pandoc#apply')
endfunction

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