7

In a tutorial it said

If you use the goto statement to jump into the middle of a block, automatic variables within that block are not initialized.

Then in the below code if i can be accessed/declared then why it is not initialised?

int main()
{
   goto here;
   {
     int i=10;
     here:
      printf("%d\n",i);
   }
   return 0;
}

ps:output is some garbage value.

1
  • 3
    Just write your initialisation explicitly, than it gets clearer: int i;i=10;
    – Argeman
    Jul 12, 2012 at 8:29

6 Answers 6

12

There's no logic behind your question "if i can be accessed, why...". Being able to "access i" isn't an argument for or against anything. It just means that the printf statement is in the same scope as i. However, since you jumped over the initializer, the variable is uninitialized (just as your tutorial says).

Reading an uninitialized variable is undefined behaviour, so your program is ill-formed.

The memory for the variable i has already been set aside at compile time, since the variable is known to exist inside the inner block. The memory doesn't get allocated dynamically, as you may be imagining. It's already there, but it never got set to anything determinate because of the goto.

Rule of thumb: Don't jump across initializers.

15
  • When compiler compiles instructions will be something like this for the block, push i and then initializing instruction for i,then how push i is executed when goto statement makes it to jump to printf instruction directly?i couldnt understand that
    – Vindhya G
    Jul 12, 2012 at 8:38
  • 1
    thats interesting - so the compiler sees the statement int i=10; and allocates enough memory on the stack for an int but doesn't set it to 10. If the statement was split, e.g. int i; i=10; we could think of the compiler acting on the 1st statement but skipping the 2nd. This is a good question - gets you thinking
    – bph
    Jul 12, 2012 at 8:39
  • 4
    @Hiett: if it helps remember what's going on, variable declarations are not statements in the C grammar. All the declarations in a block contribute to the compiler's understanding of what space it needs to make available on the stack when code enters that block, which is sort of why in C89 they had to be at the start of the block, before any statements. Initializers for and assignments to those variables are treated somewhat separately from the knowledge that a total of (say) 4 bytes of automatic variables are called for. Jul 12, 2012 at 8:43
  • 1
    @vindhya: you could examine the emitted code if you can read assembly, but possibly what happens is that at the site of the goto, the compiler adjusts the stack pointer before jumping. Another possibility is that the compiler has actually "lifted" the space for the variable i outside the block, so that space is made for it at the start of the function, and the stack pointer is moved once on function entry, and then not moved again as you enter and leave the block. Jul 12, 2012 at 8:48
  • 1
    To clarify "memory for i has already been set aside at compile time" (could be misleading): i is a local variable for which space is created on the stack each time the function is called and the stack is restored when the function exits - the compiler added the code to create the space on the stack and replace the variable with the address of this space, in this case [rbp-4] where 4 is the size of int
    – slashmais
    Jul 12, 2012 at 9:12
3

Variables are visible in the scope in which they are declared (between the {} in this case), irrespective of the order of execution of the statements within that scope. The goto bypasses the initialization of i, meaning it has an undefined value when the printf() is invoked.

2

Consider another, obvious, situation:

int main()
{
    int i; //i is declared, but not initialized
    goto here;
    {
       i=10;//i is initialized 
       here: //you've skipped the initialization
       printf("%d\n",i);//and got garbage
    }
return 0;
}

In your case:

int main()
{

    goto here;
    {
       //printf("%d\n",i);  // i does not exist here yet
       int i; //from here until the end of the scope variable i exists
       i=10;  // i exists here and smth is written into it
   here:  // i exists here
       printf("%d\n",i); // i exists here and it's value is accessed
    }
return 0;
}

So, int i = 5; that's really 2 things. One is declaration, and is not skippable by anything, including goto (much like opening of a new scope is also unaffected. You;ve jumped into the middle of the scope, but the scope was already there). Second is operation assignment, and since it's normal operation (program flow) it can be skipped by goto or 'break' or 'continue', or 'return'

4
  • While I suspect that you are using "initialize" in a colloquial sense, c formally treats "assignment" and "initialization" as separate things even though they can both be indicated with a =. Just try int a[3]; a = { 1, 2, 3}; as compared to int a[3] = {1, 2, 3};. Nov 25, 2012 at 19:26
  • @dmckee I've used "initialize" in a sense "assigning a value to a variable that was never assigned before and contains garbage". The array initializer is quite a hack and exception by itself. So leaving it out of consideration makes the image clearer.
    – Agent_L
    Nov 25, 2012 at 19:41
  • I understood, but the standard uses the words "assignment" and "initialization" and in that formal context they are different. That's a pain when you're writing informally because there is always a risk of introducing confusion. Nov 25, 2012 at 19:47
  • @dmckee The standard uses many words contrary to common sense and insists on calling UB on every other behavior that's perfectly defined by implementations. So IMHO standard is best used to dazzle internet opponents, not to actually help someone understand something.
    – Agent_L
    Nov 26, 2012 at 12:42
0

The C compiler will parse the source file and it "records" any variable initializations.
When it reaches

printf("%d\n", i)

it will know that the variable i already exists and he should be able to use it, since it is in scope.
At execution space is reserved for the i variable on the stack right after the call of the main function, and before any of the code in main() is executed.

0

Because the language standard says so:

6.7.8 Initialization

Semantics

If an object that has automatic storage duration is not initialized explicitly, its value is indeterminate.

J.2 Undefined behavior

The behavior is undefined in the following circumstances:

The value of an object with automatic storage duration is used while it is indeterminate.

6.8.4.2 The switch statement

EXAMPLE In the artificial program fragment

switch (expr)
{
  int i = 4;
  f(i);
  case 0:
    i = 17;
    /* falls through into default code */
  default:
    printf("%d\n", i);
}

the object whose identifier is i exists with automatic storage duration (within the block) but is never initialized, and thus if the controlling expression has a nonzero value, the call to the printf function will access an indeterminate value. Similarly, the call to the function f cannot be reached.

4
  • Appendix J is only informative. Actually 6.3.2.1 p2 (according to C11) is more precise and normative. It is only UB if the auto variable could have been declared with register, that is its address is never taken. Jul 12, 2012 at 9:33
  • @JensGustedt The value is still indeterminate and it's better to avoid even a potential UB. Jul 12, 2012 at 9:42
  • On most architectures (that don't have trap representations) it is just an unspecified value, which should already be bad enough to convince everybody, not to do such things :) Jul 12, 2012 at 11:36
  • @JensGustedt I know, ditto with signed overflows. Jul 12, 2012 at 11:42
-1

C lets you access anything within your address space, whether it's actually initialized or not. Sometimes working like that crashes or shows garbage, sometimes it happens to print something useful, but it's all undefined behavior. Handy trick, but a great way to break your program, so don't think that just getting a result means your trick works.

7
  • 4
    Surely C doesn't "let you access anything anywhere".
    – Kerrek SB
    Jul 12, 2012 at 8:22
  • 1
    You can put a pointer to any number you want into printf, and it'll happily print the contents of that memory location as if it was a local variable. Maybe I should have qualified with "within your address space" but surely you know what I meant? Jul 12, 2012 at 8:23
  • 2
    Variables are still scoped, so it's not like many other languages where everything you ever defined is readable from anywhere else. You still have to play by the rules. Also, there are strict rules for pointer semantics, and you're most likely talking about some sort of undefined behaviour...
    – Kerrek SB
    Jul 12, 2012 at 8:25
  • 3
    If you write return i; instead of return 0; in the questioner's code, then C doesn't let you access anything anywhere. The question seems to be about how i can be in scope yet uninitialized, rather than about C's generous offer to you to shoot yourself in the foot by using pointers to roam around the address space :-) Jul 12, 2012 at 8:26
  • Surely C lets you access anything with a pointer (within your address space...), but that is not the point of the question. There are no pointers involved, just "normal" variables. So accessing the variable is not a trick, it is just accessing a variable. The jump over the initialisation is bad...
    – Argeman
    Jul 12, 2012 at 8:27

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