3949

How can I horizontally center a <div> within another <div> using CSS?

<div id="outer">  
  <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>
  • 4
    Of those great answers, I just want to highlight that you must give "#inner" a "width", or it will be "100%", and you can't tell if it's already centered. – Jony Nov 7 '17 at 8:22

96 Answers 96

4391

You can apply this CSS to the inner <div>:

#inner {
  width: 50%;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

Of course, you don't have to set the width to 50%. Any width less than the containing <div> will work. The margin: 0 auto is what does the actual centering.

If you are targeting IE8+, it might be better to have this instead:

#inner {
  display: table;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

It will make the inner element center horizontally and it works without setting a specific width.

Working example here:

#inner {
  display: table;
  margin: 0 auto;
}
<div id="outer" style="width:100%">
  <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>

  • 10
    For the vertical centering I usually use "line-height" (line-height == height). This is simple and nice but it's only working with a one line content text :) – Nicolas Guillaume Jun 23 '10 at 12:36
  • 90
    You have to use the !DOCTYPE tag on your html page to make it work well on IE. – Fabio Jan 28 '12 at 14:23
  • 14
    Note that it may be necessary to add "float:none;" for the #inner. – Mert Mertce Sep 27 '13 at 8:30
  • 14
    You also set the top and bottom margins to 0, which is unrelated. Better putting margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto I think. – Emmanuel Touzery Feb 8 '14 at 22:45
  • 12
    Not necessarily margin:0 auto: it can be margin: <whatever_vertical_margin_you_need> auto second being the horizontal margin. – YakovL May 3 '16 at 19:07
1178

If you don't want to set a fixed width on the inner div you could do something like this:

#outer {
  width: 100%;
  text-align: center;
}

#inner {
  display: inline-block;
}
<div id="outer">  
    <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>

That makes the inner div into an inline element that can be centered with text-align.

  • 12
    @SabaAhang the correct syntax for that would be float: none; and is probably only needed because #inner has inherited a float of either left or right from somewhere else in your CSS. – Doug McLean Nov 12 '15 at 9:21
  • 5
    This is a nice solution. Just keep in mind that inner will inherit text-align so you may want to set inner's text-align to initial or some other value. – pmoleri Nov 18 '16 at 21:52
341

The best approaches are with CSS 3.

Box model:

#outer {
  width: 100%;
  /* Firefox */
  display: -moz-box;
  -moz-box-pack: center;
  -moz-box-align: center;
  /* Safari and Chrome */
  display: -webkit-box;
  -webkit-box-pack: center;
  -webkit-box-align: center;
  /* W3C */
  display: box;
  box-pack: center;
  box-align: center;
}

#inner {
  width: 50%;
}
<div id="outer">
  <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>

According to your usability you may also use the box-orient, box-flex, box-direction properties.

Flex:

#outer {
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: row;
    flex-wrap: wrap;
    justify-content: center;
    align-items: center;
}

Read more about centering the child elements

And this explains why the box model is the best approach:

  • it also works for me when inner div have float: left; – Tareq Nov 12 '12 at 6:30
  • 22
    Make sure you read this answer first before you go about implementing this solution. – cimmanon Apr 24 '13 at 18:51
  • 4
    Safari, as of now, still requires -webkit flags for flexbox (display: -webkit-flex; and -webkit-align-items: center; and -webkit-justify-content: center;) – Joseph Hansen Jul 23 '15 at 15:59
233

Suppose that your div is 200px wide:

.centered {
  position: absolute;
  left: 50%;
  margin-left: -100px;
}

Make sure the parent element is positioned i.e. relative, fixed, absolute, or sticky.

If you don't know the width of your div, you can use transform:translateX(-50%); instead of the negative margin.

https://jsfiddle.net/gjvfxxdj/

  • This doesn't work in Safari – cesards Aug 8 '15 at 9:05
  • I don't like this solution because when the inner element is too broad for the screen, you can't scroll over the whole element horizontally. margin: 0 auto works better. – Aloso Dec 30 '15 at 4:02
  • why do u put margin left: -100, this will not work – Robert Limanto Nov 29 '16 at 23:51
  • I've read that it's the only method that will work in IE6/7 – Andy Oct 31 '17 at 7:25
  • margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; centres a block level element – desertsofcacti Nov 10 '17 at 19:15
213

I've created this example to show how to vertically and horizontally align.

Code is basically this:

#outer {
  position: relative;
}

and...

#inner {
  margin: auto;  
  position: absolute;
  left:0;
  right: 0;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
} 

and it will stay in the center even when you re-size your screen.

  • 12
    +1 for this method, I was about to answer with it. Note that you must declare a width on the element you wish to center horizontally (or height if centering vertically). Here's a comprehensive explanation: codepen.io/shshaw/full/gEiDt. One of the more versatile and widely-supported methods of centering elements vertically and/or horizontally. – stvnrynlds Dec 16 '13 at 18:27
  • 6
    You cannot use padding within the div, but if you want to give the illusion use a border of the same color. – Squirrl Jul 9 '14 at 11:45
  • I think for this method to work, you need to set the with and height of inner div – Nicolas S.Xu Nov 29 '15 at 21:39
181

Some posters have mentioned the CSS 3 way to center using display:box.

This syntax is outdated and shouldn't be used anymore. [See also this post].

So just for completeness here is the latest way to center in CSS 3 using the Flexible Box Layout Module.

So if you have simple markup like:

<div class="box">
  <div class="item1">A</div>
  <div class="item2">B</div>
  <div class="item3">C</div>
</div>

...and you want to center your items within the box, here's what you need on the parent element (.box):

.box {
    display: flex;
    flex-wrap: wrap; /* Optional. only if you want the items to wrap */
    justify-content: center; /* For horizontal alignment */
    align-items: center; /* For vertical alignment */
}

.box {
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  /* Optional. only if you want the items to wrap */
  justify-content: center;
  /* For horizontal alignment */
  align-items: center;
  /* For vertical alignment */
}
* {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}
html,
body {
  height: 100%;
}
.box {
  height: 200px;
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  border: 2px solid tomato;
}
.box div {
  margin: 0 10px;
  width: 100px;
}
.item1 {
  height: 50px;
  background: pink;
}
.item2 {
  background: brown;
  height: 100px;
}
.item3 {
  height: 150px;
  background: orange;
}
<div class="box">
  <div class="item1">A</div>
  <div class="item2">B</div>
  <div class="item3">C</div>
</div>

If you need to support older browsers which use older syntax for flexbox here's a good place to look.

  • what do you mean by "syntax is outdated", is it deprecated? – Konga Raju Sep 6 '13 at 10:18
  • 4
    The Flexbox specification has gone through 3 major revisions. The most recent draft is from Sept 2012, which officially deprecates all previous drafts. However, browser support is spotty (particularly old Android browsers): stackoverflow.com/questions/15662578/… – cimmanon Oct 1 '13 at 20:33
  • This worked for me in Chrome when Justin Poliey's version didn't. – Vern Jensen Jun 29 '16 at 2:50
  • Isn't the "justify-content: center;" for the vertical alignment and the "align-items: center;" for the horizontal alignment? – Wouter Vanherck Mar 22 '17 at 12:04
  • 3
    @WouterVanherck it depends on the flex-direction value. If it is 'row' (the default) - then justify-content: center; is for the horizontal alignment (like I mentioned in the answer) If it is 'column' - then justify-content: center; is for the vertical alignment. – Danield Mar 22 '17 at 12:29
128

If you don't want to set a fixed width and don't want the extra margin, add display: inline-block to your element.

You can use:

#element {
    display: table;
    margin: 0 auto;
}
83

Centering a div of unknown height and width

Horizontally and vertically. It works with reasonably modern browsers (Firefox, Safari/WebKit, Chrome, Internet Explorer 10, Opera, etc.)

.content {
  position: absolute;
  left: 50%;
  top: 50%;
  -webkit-transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
}
<div class="content">This works with any content</div>

Tinker with it further on Codepen or on JSBin.

81

It cannot be centered if you don't give it a width, otherwise it will take, by default the whole horizontal space.

  • 44
    and if you don't know the width? Say because the content is dynamic? – gman Jun 2 '11 at 15:45
  • max-width? what about that? – Will Hoskings Mar 17 '18 at 22:32
81

CSS3's box-align property

#outer {
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
    display:box;
    box-orient:horizontal;
    box-pack:center;
    box-align:center;
}
  • 7
    Make sure you read this answer first before you go about implementing this solution. – cimmanon Apr 24 '13 at 18:52
79

Set the width and set margin-left and margin-right to auto. That's for horizontal only, though. If you want both ways, you'd just do it both ways. Don't be afraid to experiment; it's not like you'll break anything.

56

I recently had to center a "hidden" div (ie, display:none;) that had a tabled form within it that needed to be centered on the page. I wrote the following jQuery to display the hidden div & then update the CSS to the automatic generated width of the table and change the margin to center it. (The display toggle is triggered by clicking on a link, but this code wasn't neccessary to display.)

NOTE: I'm sharing this code because Google brought me to this Stack Overflow solution & everything would have worked except that hidden elements don't have any width & can't be resized/centered until after they are displayed.

$(function(){
  $('#inner').show().width($('#innerTable').width()).css('margin','0 auto');
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="inner" style="display:none;">
  <form action="">
    <table id="innerTable">
      <tr><td>Name:</td><td><input type="text"></td></tr>
      <tr><td>Email:</td><td><input type="text"></td></tr>
      <tr><td>Email:</td><td><input type="submit"></td></tr>
    </table>
  </form>
</div>

51

The way I usually do it is using absolute position:

#inner{
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
    position: absolute;
}

The outer div doesn't need any extra propertites for this to work.

  • This may not work if you have other divs below the centered div. – NoChance Jul 26 '18 at 7:59
49

For Firefox and Chrome:

<div style="width:100%;">
  <div style="width: 50%; margin: 0px auto;">Text</div>
</div>

For Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Chrome:

<div style="width:100%; text-align:center;">
  <div style="width: 50%; margin: 0px auto; text-align:left;">Text</div>
</div>

The text-align: property is optional for modern browsers, but it is necessary in Internet Explorer Quirks Mode for legacy browsers support.

  • 5
    There is no need for text-align property. It's completely un-necessary. – Touhid Rahman May 23 '13 at 5:29
  • text-align is actually necessary for it to work in IE quicks mode, so if you don't mind adding a little expression to support older browsers keep it there. (IE8 with IE8 rules and IE7 rules both work without text-align, so may be it's only IE6 and older that are concerned) – heytools Nov 4 '17 at 2:02
44

This is my answer.

#outerDiv {
  width: 500px;
}

#innerDiv {
  width: 200px;
  margin: 0 auto;
}
<div id="outerDiv">
  <div id="innerDiv">Inner Content</div>
</div>

41

Another solution for this without having to set a width for one of the elements is using the CSS 3 transform attribute.

#outer {
  position: relative;
}

#inner {
  position: absolute;
  left: 50%;

  transform: translateX(-50%);
}

The trick is that translateX(-50%) sets the #inner element 50 percent to the left of its own width. You can use the same trick for vertical alignment.

Here's a Fiddle showing horizontal and vertical alignment.

More information is on Mozilla Developer Network.

  • 2
    One may need vendor prefixes as well : -webkit-transform: translate(-50%,0); -moz-transform: translate(-50%,0); -ms-transform: translate(-50%,0); -khtml-transform: translate(-50%,0); -o-transform: translate(-50%,0); – Skippy le Grand Gourou Sep 2 '15 at 13:48
39

Chris Coyier who wrote an excellent post on 'Centering in the Unknown' on his blog. It's a roundup of multiple solutions. I posted one that isn't posted in this question. It has more browser support then the flexbox-solution, and you're not using display: table; which could break other things.

/* This parent can be any width and height */
.outer {
  text-align: center;
}

/* The ghost, nudged to maintain perfect centering */
.outer:before {
  content: '.';
  display: inline-block;
  height: 100%;
  vertical-align: middle;
  width:0;
  overflow:hidden;
}

/* The element to be centered, can
   also be of any width and height */ 
.inner {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  width: 300px;
}
34

I realize I'm pretty late to the game, but this is a very popular question, and I recently found an approach I haven't seen mentioned anywhere here, so I figured I'd document it.

#outer {
    position: absolute;
    left: 50%;
}

#inner {
    position: relative;
    left: -50%;
}

EDIT: both elements must be the same width to function correctly.

  • Just set this rule for #inner only: #inner { position:relative; left:50%; transform:translateX(-50%); }. This works for any width. – Jose Rui Santos Nov 24 '15 at 10:30
29

For example, see this link and the snippet below:

div#outer {
  height: 120px;
  background-color: red;
}

div#inner {
  width: 50%;
  height: 100%;
  background-color: green;
  margin: 0 auto;
  text-align: center; /* For text alignment to center horizontally. */
  line-height: 120px; /* For text alignment to center vertically. */
}
<div id="outer" style="width:100%;">
  <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>

If you have a lot of children under a parent, so your CSS content must be like this example on fiddle.

The HTML content look likes this:

<div id="outer" style="width:100%;">
    <div class="inner"> Foo Text </div>
    <div class="inner"> Foo Text </div>
    <div class="inner"> Foo Text </div>
    <div class="inner"> </div>
    <div class="inner"> </div>
    <div class="inner"> </div>
    <div class="inner"> </div>
    <div class="inner"> </div>
    <div class="inner"> Foo Text </div>
</div>

Then see this example on fiddle.

26

Centering only horizontally

In my experience, the best way to center a box horizontally is to apply the following properties:

The container:

  • should have text-align: center;

The content box:

  • should have display: inline-block;

Demo:

.container {
  width: 100%;
  height: 120px;
  background: #CCC;
  text-align: center;
}

.centered-content {
  display: inline-block;
  background: #FFF;
  padding: 20px;
  border: 1px solid #000;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="centered-content">
    Center this!
  </div>
</div>

See also this Fiddle!


Centering both horizontally & vertically

In my experience, the best way to center a box both vertically and horizontally is to use an additional container and apply the following properties:

The outer container:

  • should have display: table;

The inner container:

  • should have display: table-cell;
  • should have vertical-align: middle;
  • should have text-align: center;

The content box:

  • should have display: inline-block;

Demo:

.outer-container {
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
  height: 120px;
  background: #CCC;
}

.inner-container {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
  text-align: center;
}

.centered-content {
  display: inline-block;
  background: #FFF;
  padding: 20px;
  border: 1px solid #000;
}
<div class="outer-container">
  <div class="inner-container">
    <div class="centered-content">
      Center this!
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

See also this Fiddle!

25

The easiest way:

#outer {
  width: 100%;
  text-align: center;
}
#inner {
  margin: auto;
  width: 200px;
}
<div id="outer">
  <div id="inner">Blabla</div>
</div>

  • 1
    As your fiddle notes, #inner has to have a width set on it. – Michael Terry Feb 5 '15 at 21:06
  • #outer doesn't need any width:100%; as the <div> by default always has width:100%. and text-align:center is also not a necessary at all. – Mobarak Ali May 6 at 22:57
24

If width of the content is unknown you can use the following method. Suppose we have these two elements:

  • .outer -- full width
  • .inner -- no width set (but a max-width could be specified)

Suppose the computed width of the elements are 1000px and 300px respectively. Proceed as follows:

  1. Wrap .inner inside .center-helper
  2. Make .center-helper an inline block; it becomes the same size as .inner making it 300px wide.
  3. Push .center-helper 50% right relative to its parent; this places its left at 500px wrt. outer.
  4. Push .inner 50% left relative to its parent; this places its left at -150px wrt. center helper which means its left is at 500 - 150 = 350px wrt. outer.
  5. Set overflow on .outer to hidden to prevent horizontal scrollbar.

Demo:

body {
  font: medium sans-serif;
}

.outer {
  overflow: hidden;
  background-color: papayawhip;
}

.center-helper {
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
  left: 50%;
  background-color: burlywood;
}

.inner {
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
  left: -50%;
  background-color: wheat;
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="center-helper">
    <div class="inner">
      <h1>A div with no defined width</h1>
      <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.<br>
          Duis condimentum sem non turpis consectetur blandit.<br>
          Donec dictum risus id orci ornare tempor.<br>
          Proin pharetra augue a lorem elementum molestie.<br>
          Nunc nec justo sit amet nisi tempor viverra sit amet a ipsum.</p>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

.outer {
    overflow: hidden;
}
.center-helper {
    float: left;
    position: relative;
    left: 50%;
}
.inner {
    float: left;
    position: relative;
    left: -50%;
}
23

You can do something like this

#container {
   display: table;
   width: <width of your container>;
   height: <height of your container>;
}

#inner {
   width: <width of your center div>;
   display: table-cell;
   margin: 0 auto;
   text-align: center;
   vertical-align: middle;
}

This will also align the #inner vertically. If you don't want to, remove the display and vertical-align properties;

23

Here is what you want in the shortest way.

JSFIDDLE

#outer {
    margin - top: 100 px;
    height: 500 px; /* you can set whatever you want */
    border: 1 px solid# ccc;
}

#inner {
    border: 1 px solid# f00;
    position: relative;
    top: 50 % ;
    transform: translateY(-50 % );
}
  • 3
    That centers it vertically. – Michael Terry Feb 6 '15 at 0:24
21

Text-align: center

Applying text-align: center the inline contents are centered within the line box. However since the inner div has by default width: 100% you have to set a specific width or use one of the following:

#inner {
  display: inline-block;
}

#outer {
  text-align: center;
}
<div id="outer">
  <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>


Margin: 0 auto

Using margin: 0 auto is another option and it is more suitable for older browsers compatibility. It works together with display: table.

#inner {
  display: table;
  margin: 0 auto;
}
<div id="outer">
  <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>


Flexbox

display: flex behaves like a block element and lays out its content according to the flexbox model. It works with justify-content: center.

Please note: Flexbox is compatible with most of the browsers but not all. See here for a complete and up to date list of browsers compatibility.

#inner {
  display: inline-block;
}

#outer {
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
}
<div id="outer">
  <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>


Transform

transform: translate lets you modify the coordinate space of the CSS visual formatting model. Using it, elements can be translated, rotated, scaled, and skewed. To center horizontally it require position: absolute and left: 50%.

#inner {
  position: absolute;
  left: 50%;
  transform: translate(-50%, 0%);
}
<div id="outer">
  <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
</div>


<center> (Deprecated)

The tag <center> is the HTML alternative to text-align: center. It works on older browsers and most of the new ones but it is not considered a good practice since this feature is obsolete and has been removed from the Web standards.

#inner {
  display: inline-block;
}
<div id="outer">
  <center>
    <div id="inner">Foo foo</div>
  </center>
</div>

21

You can use display: flex for your outer div and to horizontally center you have to add justify-content: center

#outer{
    display: flex;
    justify-content: center;
}

or you can visit w3schools - CSS flex Property for more ideas.

20

This method also works just fine:

div.container {
   display: flex;
   justify-content: center; /* for horizontal alignment */
   align-items: center;     /* for vertical alignment   */
}

For the inner <div>, the only condition is that its height and width must not be larger than the ones of its container.

20

Flex have more than 97% browser support coverage and might be the best way to solve these kind of problems within few lines:

#outer {
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
}
20

Well, I managed to find a solution that maybe will fit all situations, but uses JavaScript:

Here's the structure:

<div class="container">
  <div class="content">Your content goes here!</div>
  <div class="content">Your content goes here!</div>
  <div class="content">Your content goes here!</div>
</div>

And here's the JavaScript snippet:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('.container .content').each( function() {
    container = $(this).closest('.container');
    content = $(this);

    containerHeight = container.height();
    contentHeight = content.height();

    margin = (containerHeight - contentHeight) / 2;
    content.css('margin-top', margin);
  })
});

If you want to use it in a responsive approach, you can add the following:

$(window).resize(function() {
  $('.container .content').each( function() {
    container = $(this).closest('.container');
    content = $(this);

    containerHeight = container.height();
    contentHeight = content.height();

    margin = (containerHeight - contentHeight) / 2;
    content.css('margin-top', margin);
  })
});
19

One option existed that I found:

Everybody says to use:

margin: auto 0;

But there is another option. Set this property for the parent div. It works perfectly anytime:

text-align: center;

And see, child go center.

And finally CSS for you:

#outer{
     text-align: center;
     display: block; /* Or inline-block - base on your need */
}

#inner
{
     position: relative;
     margin: 0 auto; /* It is good to be */
}
  • text-align work for text alignment in its container not for its container to its parent. – Lalit Kumar Dec 4 '13 at 7:32
  • i test it , i problem with set child to center , must when you have more one child , more times margin:0 auto font answer , but , text-align center , for parent make this child be center , even if they are element and not be text , test and see what happen – Pnsadeghy Dec 4 '13 at 8:35
  • text-align center text only. You right at this time but when you write a container css which contains a child with different width and color your code does't work. Test it again!!!! – Lalit Kumar Dec 4 '13 at 9:23
  • See this example jsfiddle.net/uCdPK/2 and tell me what do you think about it!!!!! – Lalit Kumar Dec 4 '13 at 10:03

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