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I am using SFML and it has a color function that takes values in RGB. example.. (255,0,0). I would like to be able to cycle these numbers though a loop so that the displayed colour cycles though the hue...

So if I am using (76,204,63) the function will adjust those 3 numbers. So I need the function to intake rgb convert to HSV and then return rgb.

Any ideas how I would go about this?

the sfml code I wish to use is...

_sprite.setColor(76,204,63); This will set the sprite to a colour... I ma trying to work out how once that is done with those numbers to cycle the colour though the hue.

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3 Answers 3

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With a bit googling I've found this answer and converted the code to C++ with SFML in mind. I'm casting around pretty badly, so feel free to make it better. I guess it should even be possible to replace the 3x3 array.

sf::Uint8 clampAndConvert(float v)
{
    if(v < 0)
        return 0;
    if( v > 255)
        return 255;
    return static_cast<sf::Uint8>(v);
}

sf::Color RGBRotate(sf::Color old, float degrees)
{
    float cosA = cos(degrees*3.14159265f/180);
    float sinA = sin(degrees*3.14159265f/180);
    float rot = 1.f/3.f * (1.0f - cosA) + sqrt(1.f/3.f) * sinA;

    float rx = old.r * (cosA + (1.0f - cosA) / 3.0f) + old.g * rot + old.b * rot;
    float gx = old.r * rot + old.g * (cosA + 1.f/3.f*(1.0f - cosA)) + old.b * rot;
    float bx = old.r * rot + old.g * rot + old.b * cosA + 1.f/3.f * (1.0f - cosA);

    return sf::Color(clampAndConvert(rx), clampAndConvert(gx), clampAndConvert(bx), old.a);
}

Edit: Removed unnecessary casts.

Edit: Got rid of the matrix.

Edit: As I've noticed the code doesn't really work as wanted, but here's a hardcoded solution that works perfectly, just isn't that compact and nice.

#include <SFML/Graphics.hpp>

int main()
{
    sf::RenderWindow Screen (sf::VideoMode (800, 600, 32), "Game", sf::Style::Close);
    Screen.setFramerateLimit(60);

    sf::RectangleShape rect(sf::Vector2f(350.f, 350.f));
    rect.setPosition(150, 150);

    int dr = 0;
    int dg = 0;
    int db = 0;

    sf::Uint8 r = 255, g = 0,  b = 0;

    while (Screen.isOpen())
    {
        sf::Event Event;
        while (Screen.pollEvent (Event))
        {
            if (Event.type == sf::Event::Closed)
                Screen.close();
        }

        r += dr;
        g += dg;
        b += db;

        if(r == 255 && g == 0 && b == 0)
        {
            dr = 0; dg = 1; db = 0;
        }

        if(r == 255 && g == 255 && b == 0)
        {
            dr = -1; dg = 0; db = 0;
        }

        if(r == 0 && g == 255 && b == 0)
        {
            dr = 0; dg = 0; db = 1;
        }

        if(r == 0 && g == 255 && b == 255)
        {
            dr = 0; dg = -1; db = 0;
        }

        if(r == 0 && g == 0 && b == 255)
        {
            dr = 1; dg = 0; db = 0;
        }

        if(r == 255 && g == 0 && b == 255)
        {
            dr = 0; dg = 0; db = -1;
        }

        rect.setFillColor(sf::Color(r, g, b));

        Screen.clear();
        Screen.draw(rect);
        Screen.display();
    }

    return 0;
}
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Convert RGB to HSL or HSV, modify the hue, then convert the result back to RGB.

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Jerry's answer above is one correct way. If you don't care about preserving luminance (which if you do - don't use HSV, either), you can simply rotate your RGB color along the R=G=B axis. This is just a matrix multiply and saves you the conversion to and from HLS or HSV space.

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  • You can think of an RGB value as a 3D point in a space defined by the R-axis, the G-axis, and the B-axis. You can then rotate that 3D point around an arbitrary axis (and infinite line of any orientation, passing through the origin). See here for details of how to do an arbitrary rotation. The matrix at the end looks scary, but once you calculate a few sines and cosines once, it becomes pretty simple. Just remember to normalize the vector <1,1,1> before doing the calculation. Jul 12, 2012 at 19:44
  • It's easier to see how this works for big rotations. Say we start with {50, 100, 150}. We can rotate this to {150, 50, 150} and then to {100, 150, 50}. This rotation is equivalent to multiplying by the matrix {{0,1,0}, {0,0,1}, {1,0,0}}.
    – MSalters
    Jul 13, 2012 at 8:26

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