7

I have a .txt file that has a bunch of formatted data in it that looks like the following:

...
   1     75175.18     95128.46
   1    790890.89    795829.16
   1    875975.98    880914.25
   8   2137704.37   2162195.53
   8   2167267.27   2375275.28
  10   2375408.74   2763997.33
  14   2764264.26   2804437.77
  15   2804504.50   2881981.98
  16   2882048.72   2887921.25
  16   2993093.09   2998031.36
  19   3004104.10   3008041.37
...

I am trying to load each row as an entry into a table in my database, where each column is a different field. I am having trouble getting mySQL to separate all of the data properly. I think the issue is coming from the fact that not all of the numbers are separated with an equidistant white-space amount.

Here are two queries I have tried so far (I have also tried several variations of these queries):

LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE 
'/some/Path/segmentation.txt' 
INTO TABLE clip (slideNum, startTime, endTime) 
SET presID = 1;


LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE 
'/some/Path/segmentation.txt' 
INTO TABLE clip 
FIELDS TERMINATED BY ' ' 
LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'
(slideNum, startTime, endTime) 
SET presID = 1;

Any ideas how to get this to work?

1
  • Also, notice the single white space at the beginning of each line. – bddicken Jul 12 '12 at 22:42
14

These are what we call "fixed-width" records and LOAD DATA doesn't play well with them. Options:

  1. Clean up data in Excel first, or
  2. Load up the data to a temp table with only 1 column, shoving an entire text row into that column. Then you can use SUBSTR() and TRIM() to slice out the columns you need into the final table.
  3. Or with user variables (@row) you can do it all within the LOAD DATA statement.
LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE 
'/some/Path/segmentation.txt' 
INTO TABLE clip
(@row)
SET slideNum = TRIM(SUBSTR(@row,1,4)),
    startTime = TRIM(SUBSTR(@row,5,13)),
    endTime = TRIM(SUBSTR(@row,18,13))
;
3
  • Ok, cool. Would this query work better if there was only one space in-between every value? It would probably not be that difficult to write a script that made the spacing more consistent. – bddicken Jul 12 '12 at 23:01
  • 1
    Typically you should use commas, semicolons, tabs, or pipes ('|') to separate fields in text files (CSV = comma-separated values is most common format). Then LOAD DATA can handle them easily. – J. Miller Jul 12 '12 at 23:06
  • Wow, option 3 (and the query that went along with it) worked perfectly , thanks! – bddicken Jul 12 '12 at 23:25
0
    LOAD DATA
CHARACTERSET AL32UTF8
INFILE 'DCF Master 14APR2013 VSPCFM_reduced size.txt'
INTO TABLE EMPLOYEE3
(
a = TRIM(SUBSTR(@row,1,11)),
b = TRIM(SUBSTR(@row,33,38)),
c = TRIM(SUBSTR(@row,70,86))
)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.